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Runemarks

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Overview

Seven o'clock on a Monday morning, five hundred years after the end of the world, and goblins had been at the cellar again...Not that anyone would admit it was goblins. In Maddy Smith's world, order rules. Chaos, old gods, fairies, goblins, magic, glamours–all of these were supposedly vanquished centuries ago. But Maddy knows that a small bit of magic has survived. The "ruinmark" she was born with on her palm proves it–and makes the other villagers fearful that she is a witch (though helpful in dealing with the ...

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Runemarks

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Overview

Seven o'clock on a Monday morning, five hundred years after the end of the world, and goblins had been at the cellar again...Not that anyone would admit it was goblins. In Maddy Smith's world, order rules. Chaos, old gods, fairies, goblins, magic, glamours–all of these were supposedly vanquished centuries ago. But Maddy knows that a small bit of magic has survived. The "ruinmark" she was born with on her palm proves it–and makes the other villagers fearful that she is a witch (though helpful in dealing with the goblins-in-the-cellar problem). But the mysterious traveler One-Eye sees Maddy's mark not as a defect, but as a destiny. And Maddy will need every scrap of forbidden magic One-Eye can teach her if she is to survive that destiny.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

In Norse myth the whole world ended with Ragnarók, the last battle, at which the gods were defeated and after which eternal winter descended. In her highly successful first children's novel, however, the author of the bestselling Chocolattells readers what happened next. The supposed end of all things is now centuries past and the Middle World is ruled by the Order, a repressive theocracy reminiscent of the Magisterium in Philip Pullman's The Golden Compass. Maddy, born with a rune of power on her hand, is deeply unpopular in her backwoods village. Thorny and imaginative, she is believed to be a witch by the locals who would have cast her out long ago if she didn't have a convenient talent for controlling the goblins that infest their cellars. Such creatures are thick in the village because of its proximity to Red Horse Hill, a place of ancient power. Then Maddy's life is transformed when she meets first One-Eye, a mysterious traveler who agrees to train her in the ways of Faërie, and then Lucky, the trickster captain of the goblins under the hill. Throughout, Harris demonstrates a knack for moving seamlessly between the serious and the comic, and her lengthy book moves swiftly. Playing fast and loose with Norse mythology, she creates a glorious and complex world replete with rune-basedmagical spells, bickering gods, exciting adventures and difficult moral issues. Maddy's destiny, readers realize, is to remake the world, but to succeed she must first remake herself into someone worthy of that fate. Ages 10-up. (Jan.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
Children's Literature
AGERANGE: Ages 11 to 15.

The people of Malbry have long suspected that Maddy Smith is a witch, but no one--not even Maddy--knows just how much power she possesses. Magically mentored by the mysterious One-Eye, Maddy begins to understand the power of the runes she can control and send out into the world. So when One-Eye asks Maddy to accompany him to the World Below, she sees the trip as an exciting challenge and an opportunity to better understand her own powers. At the entrance to the World Below, though, One-Eye claims that he cannot follow her and that she must go and find the treasure on her own. So starts Maddy's journey into the land of the Norse gods: Odin, Freyja, Skadi, Thor and, of course, the notorious trickster Loki. Maddy is successful in the first part of her journey--to find the Whisperer/Oracle--but when her travels force her into an uneasy partnership with Loki, the adventure turns more dangerous. Soon, Maddy realizes that every god she encounters wants to kill Loki and take the Oracle for him or herself. Maddy also has another puzzle to figure out: her true identity and those of her parents. For students looking for a fantasy from a Norse perspective, this book will serve well. The characters are well-defined and the adventures believable, creating a sense of tension that lasts right up to the final chapter. Reviewer: Jean Boreen, Ph.D.

Children's Literature - Kristina Cassidy
Maddy Smith has always known that she does not fit in. The other villagers have always distrusted her because of the "runemark" on her hand; but they also depend on her to deal with the strange occurrences that have plagued the village since her birth. At first Maddy believed that she was marked by evil, but then she met One Eye, a traveler who showed her how to use magic and told her stories of the Elder Age long ago. When Maddy is fourteen and an expert magic user, One Eye misses his usual visit to Malbry. When he does arrive, One Eye brings ominous news. The mysterious Nameless, the god which has ruled since Ragnarok, is bent on ruling the nine worlds and destroying the fragile balance between Order and Chaos. Maddy sets off on a quest to find the Whisperer, a mysterious power that could help her save the worlds—or destroy them. The story draws substantially from Norse mythology. How rune magic works is not fully explored, but Maddy and other characters rely heavily on its use. While Maddy is both clever and selfless, the numerous god characters are extremely selfish in their actions and cunning in hiding their true goals. Readers familiar with Norse myth are likely to spot major plot twists long before they are revealed, but overall the climax of the plot is satisfying. Sile Bermingham's performance of the text is engaging, but her choice of Irish accents for some of the gods is a bit jarring. Teachers and parents should be aware of occasional profanity and several episodes of graphic violence. Reviewer: Kristina Cassidy
School Library Journal

Gr 7 Up
In this fantasy set "five hundred years after the End of the World," after the battle of Ragnarok, as predicted by Norse mythology, anything imaginative or magical is taboo. Fourteen-year-old Maddy Smith has a strange birthmark on her hand. A wanderer called One-Eye tells her that what she has is a runemark, and he teaches her about magic and the legends of the Aesir and Vanir. When Maddy's powers awake sleeping magic, she discovers that the legends are true and that she has an important role to play in the next battle between good and evil. Aided and opposed by a variety of gods, goblins, and humans, she learns the truth about herself as she tries to find the truth about her world. Harris has created a realistic and detailed world, and the action scenes are both vivid and engrossing. Maddy's abilities develop in a logical manner while her youth and naïveté contrast strongly with the age and wisdom of One-Eye and Loki, her companions on her quest. This epic-strength novel may bring as much attention to Norse legends as Rick Riordan's "Percy Jackson and the Olympians" series (Hyperion/Miramax) has to their Greek neighbors, and fantasy enthusiasts will find much to enjoy in this complex tale.
—Beth L. MeisterCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
The Lightning Thief meets The Sea of Trolls in this well-executed, if rather plodding children's debut by the author of the adult novel, Chocolat. In a world where the intolerant "Order" has deemed the old Norse myths as blasphemous, village misfit Maddy Smith discovers she is the daughter of the Norse god Thor. Guided by Loki and advised by Odin, Maddy travels to the "World Below" to try and thwart the prophesied war between the old gods and the new. The heroes win the day, but at least one villain escapes, hinting at a sequel. Unfortunately, Harris's determination to include just about every Norse god in her narrative brings Maddy's quest to a standstill at times. Some youngsters not well-versed in Odin's family tree may find the discussion of the gods' past grudges confusing, while others will be inspired to dig out their old copy of D'Aulaires' Norse Gods and Giants to refresh their memories of the Vanir and Aesir. A mini-course in Norse mythology for the tween set. (Fiction. 10-14)
From the Publisher
Starred Review, Publishers Weekly (circ: 34,456), November 19, 2007:
"[Harris] creates a glorious and complex world replete with rune-based magical spells, bickering gods, exciting adventures and difficult moral issues."
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780739362846
  • Publisher: Random House Audio Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/8/2008
  • Format: CD
  • Edition description: Unabridged, 9 CDs, 11 hrs. 30 min.
  • Age range: 10 - 14 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.15 (w) x 5.88 (h) x 1.68 (d)

Meet the Author

Joanne Harris studied modern and medieval languages at St. Catharine’s College, Cambridge, and was a teacher for fifteen years before turning to writing full-time. Her books, which include Chocolat, Five Quarters of the Orange, and Gentlemen and Players, have been published in over forty countries and have won a number of British and international awards. Ms. Harris lives in England with her husband and daughter.

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Read an Excerpt

Runemarks


By Joanne Harris

Knopf Books for Young Readers

Copyright © 2008 Joanne Harris
All right reserved.

ISBN: 9780375844447

Seven o'clock on a Monday morning, five hundred years after the End of the World, and goblins had been at the cellar again. Mrs. Scattergood-the landlady at the Seven Sleepers Inn-swore it was rats, but Maddy Smith knew better. Only goblins could have burrowed into the brick-lined floor, and besides, as far as she knew, rats didn't drink ale.

But she also knew that in the village of Malbry-as in the whole of the Strond Valley-certain things were never discussed, and that included anything curious, uncanny, or unnatural in any way. To be imaginative was considered almost as bad as giving oneself airs, and even dreams were hated and feared, for it was through dreams (or so the Good Book said) that the Seer-folk had crossed over from Chaos, and it was in Dream that the power of the Faerie remained, awaiting its chance to re-enter the world.

And so the folk of Malbry made every effort never to dream. They slept on boards instead of mattresses, avoided heavy evening meals, and as for telling bedtime tales-well. The children of Malbry were far more likely to hear about the martyrdom of St. Sepulchre or the latest Cleansings from World's End than tales of magic or of World Below. Which is not to say that magic didn't happen. In fact, over the past fourteen years the village of Malbry hadwitnessed more magic in one way or another than anyplace in the Middle Worlds.

That was Maddy's fault, of course. Maddy Smith was a dreamer, a teller of tales, and worse, and as such, she was used to being blamed for anything irregular that happened in the village. If a bottle of beer fell off a shelf, if the cat got into the creamery, if Adam Scattergood threw a stone at a stray dog and hit a window instead-ten to one Maddy would get the blame.

And if she protested, folk would say that she'd always had a troublesome nature, that their ill luck had begun the day she was born, and that no good would ever come of a child with a ruinmark-that rusty sign on the Smith girl's hand- which some oldsters called the Witch's Ruin and which no amount of scrubbing would remove.
It was either that or blame the goblins-otherwise known as Good Folk or Faerie-who this summer had upped their antics from raiding cellars and stealing sheep (or occasionally painting them blue) to playing the dirtiest kind of practical jokes, like leaving horse dung on the church steps, or putting soda in the communion wine to make it fizz, or turning the vinegar to piss in all the jars of pickled onions in Joe Grocer's store.

And since hardly anyone dared to mention them, or even acknowledge that they existed at all, Maddy was left to deal with the vermin from under the Hill alone and in her own way.

No one asked her how she did it. No one watched the Smith girl at work. And no one ever called her witch-except for Adam Scattergood, her employer's son, a fine boy in some ways but prone to foul language when the mood took him.

Besides, they said, why speak the word? That ruinmark surely spoke for itself.

Now Maddy considered the rust-colored mark. It looked like a letter or sigil of some kind, and sometimes it shone faintly in the dark or burned as if something hot had pressed there. It was burning now, she saw. It often did when the Good Folk were near, as if something inside her were restless and itched to be set free.
That summer, it had itched more often than ever, as the goblins swarmed in unheard-of numbers, and banishing them was one way of putting that itch to rest. Her other skills remained unused and, for the most part, untried, and though sometimes that was hard to bear-like having to pretend you're not hungry when your favorite meal is on the table-Maddy understood why it had to be so.

Cantrips and runecharms were bad enough. But glamours, true glamours, were perilous business, and if rumor of these were to reach World's End, where the servants of the Order worked day and night in study of the Word . . .

For Maddy's deepest secret-known only to her closest friend, the man folk knew as One-Eye-was that she enjoyed working magic, however shameful that might be. More than that, she thought she might be good at it too and, like anyone with a talent, longed to make use of it and to show it off to other people.
But that was impossible. At best it counted as giving herself airs.
And at worst? Folk had been Cleansed for less.

Maddy turned her attention to the cellar floor and the wide-mouthed burrow that disfigured it. It was a goblin burrow, all right, bigger and rather messier than a foxhole and still bearing the marks of clawed, thick-soled feet where the spilled earth had been kicked over. Rubble and bricks had been piled in a corner, roughly concealed beneath a stack of empty kegs. Maddy thought, with some amusement, that it must have been a lively-and somewhat drunken-party.

Filling in the burrow would be easy, she thought. The tricky thing, as always, was to ensure it stayed that way. or, the Protector, had been enough to secure the church doors, but goblins had been known to be very persistent where ale was concerned, and she knew that in this case, a single charm would not keep them out for long.

All right, then. Something more.

Continues...

Excerpted from Runemarks by Joanne Harris Copyright © 2008 by Joanne Harris. Excerpted by permission.
All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Foreword

1. Reread the last two paragraphs on page 19 that describe how the Malbry townsfolk regard Maddy. What does it mean that Maddy showed “signs of being clever,” and why would this be “disastrous for a girl”? Do you think this holds true for girls and women in our society? Does this same notion apply to boys and men?

2. Discuss negative examples of chaos that are affecting the world today (war, environmental degradation, gun proliferation, etc.).

3. The Whisperer tells Maddy, “The Folk have remarkable minds, you know— rivaling the gods in ambition and pride.” (p. 463) Discuss examples of ambition and pride in the text. Do you think it is positive to be ambitious and proud? How do ambition and pride affect many characters in the story?

4. The character of Loki fears little, but he greatly fears the fanaticism of the Order. (p. 109) What is fanaticism? What are some examples of it in the text? Why is it so dangerous? What are some examples of 20th century and early 21st century fanaticism?

5. Discuss the character of Nat Parsons and what he symbolizes. What is he after in the story and how does he go about getting it? What is his tragic flaw? Do you think he deserves his fate and ultimately his redemption in the river Dream? (p. 511)

6. Discuss the proverb “Not kings but historians rule the world.” (p. 151 and p. 161) What do you think it means? Do you agree with this idea? Throughout Runemarks, the Vanir and Aesir shift from one “Aspect” to another. (p. 166) How is this notion of one’s Aspect related to identity and truth? Although Maddy discovers she is not human, how isher “humanity” revealed throughout the story? What character traits does she possess that make her heroic?

7. Reread pages 186 and 187 that describe the Word. What does the Word symbolize? What is the significance of the golden key? How can power be an addiction?

8. Do you think One-Eye was justified in withholding information from Maddy about her life? Why do you think he experiences a feeling of “deep and undeniable relief” after the Examiner says to him, “Your time is over?” (p. 238) Why do you think the author chose to fully blind him at the end? (p. 353)

9. What error in judgment does Skadi make in forming an alliance with Nat? Why do you think one who has such keen instincts would make such a poor decision? Why does she feel justified in double-crossing the Vanir?

10. Discuss the character of Ethelberta. What is meant by the following description of Ethelberta’s realization that her “inner voice, once heard, was difficult to ignore”? (p. 321) How are Ethel and Maddy alike?

11. How do Ethelberta’s values, disregarded by the Folk, serve her in the end? Heimdell looks in awe upon Odin in his true Aspect: “To Heimdell he looked as if he were made of light, and if any of the Folk had dared to look, they would have seen it.” (p. 323) Discuss this observation. How can it apply to your own interactions with people who are different from you in some way?

12. Place students in small groups to discuss each of the novel’s major themes: power/ambition, deception, intolerance, revenge, acceptance, identity, and destiny. What other threads or themes can students identify in the story?

13. Loki is known as “the trickster” and symbolizes chaos. The Aesir mistrust Loki, but know that they need him for change to occur. (pp. 34—35) Discuss examples of chaos that have been catalysts for positive change.

14. The reader learns that Maddy wants to “free all the people in Malbry and beyond, to free them from sleep and into dream.” (p. 526) What does the author mean by freeing people from sleep? Why have—and do—dictatorial regimes use tactics such as book-burning to gain or keep control over people?

15. On the last page, the author concludes with this thought: “The river Dream, like the World Tree, has many branches, many routes.” Discuss this idea. What branches will you climb or routes will you follow to realize your dreams?

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Reading Group Guide

1. Reread the last two paragraphs on page 19 that describe how the Malbry townsfolk regard Maddy. What does it mean that Maddy showed “signs of being clever,” and why would this be “disastrous for a girl”? Do you think this holds true for girls and women in our society? Does this same notion apply to boys and men?

2. Discuss negative examples of chaos that are affecting the world today (war, environmental degradation, gun proliferation, etc.).

3. The Whisperer tells Maddy, “The Folk have remarkable minds, you know— rivaling the gods in ambition and pride.” (p. 463) Discuss examples of ambition and pride in the text. Do you think it is positive to be ambitious and proud? How do ambition and pride affect many characters in the story?

4. The character of Loki fears little, but he greatly fears the fanaticism of the Order. (p. 109) What is fanaticism? What are some examples of it in the text? Why is it so dangerous? What are some examples of 20th century and early 21st century fanaticism?

5. Discuss the character of Nat Parsons and what he symbolizes. What is he after in the story and how does he go about getting it? What is his tragic flaw? Do you think he deserves his fate and ultimately his redemption in the river Dream? (p. 511)

6. Discuss the proverb “Not kings but historians rule the world.” (p. 151 and p. 161) What do you think it means? Do you agree with this idea? Throughout Runemarks, the Vanir and Aesir shift from one “Aspect” to another. (p. 166) How is this notion of one’s Aspect related to identity and truth? Although Maddy discovers she is not human, how is her “humanity” revealed throughout the story? What character traits does she possess that make her heroic?

7. Reread pages 186 and 187 that describe the Word. What does the Word symbolize? What is the significance of the golden key? How can power be an addiction?

8. Do you think One-Eye was justified in withholding information from Maddy about her life? Why do you think he experiences a feeling of “deep and undeniable relief” after the Examiner says to him, “Your time is over?” (p. 238) Why do you think the author chose to fully blind him at the end? (p. 353)

9. What error in judgment does Skadi make in forming an alliance with Nat? Why do you think one who has such keen instincts would make such a poor decision? Why does she feel justified in double-crossing the Vanir?

10. Discuss the character of Ethelberta. What is meant by the following description of Ethelberta’s realization that her “inner voice, once heard, was difficult to ignore”? (p. 321) How are Ethel and Maddy alike?

11. How do Ethelberta’s values, disregarded by the Folk, serve her in the end? Heimdell looks in awe upon Odin in his true Aspect: “To Heimdell he looked as if he were made of light, and if any of the Folk had dared to look, they would have seen it.” (p. 323) Discuss this observation. How can it apply to your own interactions with people who are different from you in some way?

12. Place students in small groups to discuss each of the novel’s major themes: power/ambition, deception, intolerance, revenge, acceptance, identity, and destiny. What other threads or themes can students identify in the story?

13. Loki is known as “the trickster” and symbolizes chaos. The Aesir mistrust Loki, but know that they need him for change to occur. (pp. 34—35) Discuss examples of chaos that have been catalysts for positive change.

14. The reader learns that Maddy wants to “free all the people in Malbry and beyond, to free them from sleep and into dream.” (p. 526) What does the author mean by freeing people from sleep? Why have—and do—dictatorial regimes use tactics such as book-burning to gain or keep control over people?

15. On the last page, the author concludes with this thought: “The river Dream, like the World Tree, has many branches, many routes.” Discuss this idea. What branches will you climb or routes will you follow to realize your dreams?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 31 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(13)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(2)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 31 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 18, 2008

    Good but at times, graphic

    Great story with an incredible back ground in Norse mythology. BIG caution for those who have younger children. This is not Harry Potter or Lord of the Rings fantasy. Some of the images of the Netherworld are very graphic in the depictions of torturous suffering. While this is only a small part of the story, I would not recommmend this for youngsters.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 15, 2008

    Do yourself a favour.

    Read this book. If you're 10, if you're 25, if you're 50. Read it if you loved Joanne Harris's adult fiction like Chocolat, or if you love Norse mythology, or if you love a great fantasy book, or if you just love a well written engaging story. It's fast, interesting, well done and above all else entertaining. A coming of age story with mythology and fantasy thrown in. Believe me you can't miss with this one.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 14, 2013

    This is one of my favorite books ever! Even if you have little b

    This is one of my favorite books ever! Even if you have little background knowledge of the myths its still amazing,
    but knowing the myths makes it much more amazing. Every time I read it I get something new from it. 

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 18, 2012

    I found it a very difficult read, very long and circuitous. I sp

    I found it a very difficult read, very long and circuitous. I spent a
    lot of time scanning pages looking for something interesting. Although
    the ending was a disappointment, it actually kept my interest. Although
    I didn't care for the book, it didn't join the tiny select group of
    books that I just could not and would not finish.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 17, 2010

    Great entertainment. I could see a movie come from this series

    The story was great entertainment and there never was a really boring part. I could see a movie or trilogy of movies come from this series. Appropriate for all age of reader.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 1, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Reviewed by Randstostipher "tallnlankyrn" Nguyen for TeensReadToo.com

    Born with a runemark that would have had her slaughtered if she was an animal, Maddy was different from everyone in her village. Her magic didn't help her blend in much, either... well, it did help the people whenever goblins were around.

    Earlier in her life, Maddy was an acquaintance with a traveler, One-Eye, who became her mentor. He told her all about the runemarks and the Norse Legends that contain the Gods that are currently banned and erased by the leaders of the Ragnarok town.

    Odin would like Maddy to help him find treasure, where the goblins are, and to find the Norse Gods. Their adventures begin by entering Red Horse Hill. She just doesn't know it yet, but Maddy will soon find herself up against forces of evil and the prospects of a world about to end. All she has to do is summon up the Seven Sleepers, if possible, to help go against the newest evil, the Nameless, who want to erase all the supernatural for good.

    Born as an outcast, Maddy is ready to conquer what is ahead, ready to show that being different is better than being like everyone else.

    RUNEMARKS is an exciting read for all ages, building on a world full of magic and imagination. It's a breath of fresh air to have a heroine as the main character who must go against evil to save her town. Although I never knew that there was such thing as Norse mythology, this novel explains most of it, making it fully captivating.

    A great read for those who enjoy a creative world.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    ok, but not her best work..

    This book was good, but was not up to par with joanne harris's other books. She sometimes overly describes things (which seems to be a trademark of Miss Harris) but it is still and entertaining and interesting read. If you don't know Nordic tales it's a bit confusing at first, but you catch on later. It's quite long and sometimes seems to drag on. I found the ending a bit depressing but it fit well with the book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2008

    A riveting read

    I was riveted to this book from the moment I began to read. Maddy just doesn't fit into her traditional, tightly constrained village. She has magic, and that makes her suspect, as does the 'ruinmark' on her arm. It is the vagabond One-Eye, who comes through town on a yearly basis, who teaches her about the old gods and the last battle, the Ragnarok, that was supposed to have been the death of them all. He teaches her some of the uses of the power that is her, but One-Eye has his secrets. As the story unfolds, Maddy begins to learn them, and to learn that she is far more important than she ever imagined. The problem is, she is also important to One-Eye's enemies and to her own enemies, the Examiners, who want to do away with all magic, even if it means the destruction of the world. It's when Maddy starts freeing Norse gods that everything comes unglued. She has the power to undo the world, or to save it, if only she can get some very unruly, and very powerful, newly found relatives to cooperate. Commoners like the pastor's wife and an unimportant goblin also have their roles to play in this new end of the world, and Loki is left to balance on the edge of the difference between Good and Evil. It's a breathless ride! Decision after decision must be faced by the characters, with everything or nothing as the ultimate price to be paid, and one nine-year-old girl affecting the existence of all life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2008

    Truly Awsome

    This book has a mix of mythology and fantasy. I could not put it down!! I had to make myself stop or else i would become a zombie in school. I would definatly recomend it!!!

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  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    excellent young adult Norse fantasy

    Five centuries have past since the battle of Ragnarok in which the gods lost and eternal winter became the norm. With the gods gone and allegedly no more magic existing, filling the leadership vacuum of the Middle World of the Nine Worlds is the Order, who rule with an iron fisted theocracy. Maddy Smith born with a runemark on her palm knows some residue magic still exists. However the eight hundred villagers of Malbry in the Strond Valley region of the civilized Inland island scorn her because her ¿ruinmark¿ make them believe she is a witch. They would exile her except that their hamlet is on the edge of Red Horse Hill, a locale containing the pre-Ragnarok power. Thus they need the witch¿s skills to control the goblin plague that comes with being so close to the ancient magic. Everything changes for the needed pariah when a traveler One-Eye enters the village. He recognizes her having a world destiny if she can believe in herself he offers to teach Maddy in Faerie she avidly accepts. 000 The biggest problem for parents with this excellent young adult Norse fantasy is their children will be so hooked with the Potter syndrome they will stay up several nights to read this wonderful five hundred plus page tale. The story line is fast-paced from the first rune to the last while the supportive cast is fully developed from Adam the Bully to the heroine¿s family to the Devotees to the goblins Lucky and Sugar and Sack, etc. However, Maddy and to a lesser degree her mentor own this coming of age Middle World saga. 000 Harriet Klausner

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