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Running and Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind
     

Running and Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind

5.0 1
by Michael W. Austin (Editor)
 

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A unique anthology of essays exploring the philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out for a run. It features writings from some of America’s leading philosophers, including Martha Nussbaum, Charles Taliaferro, and J.P. Moreland.

  • A first-of-its-kind collection of essays exploring those gems of philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out

Overview

A unique anthology of essays exploring the philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out for a run. It features writings from some of America’s leading philosophers, including Martha Nussbaum, Charles Taliaferro, and J.P. Moreland.

  • A first-of-its-kind collection of essays exploring those gems of philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out for a run
  • Topics considered include running and the philosophy of friendship; the freedom of the long distance runner; running as aesthetic experience, and “Could a Zombie Run a Marathon?”
  • Contributing essayists include philosophers with athletic experience at the collegiate level, philosophers whose pasttime is running, and one philosopher who began running to test the ideas in his essay

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"With equal measures of scholarship and soul, the essays in Running and Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind, edited by Michael W. Austin, touch on religion, pain, happiness, and other topics that are best explored on a long run. With a pack of philosophers." (Runner's World, November 2007)

"The contributors are runners who approach the subject of running and philosophy sympathetically…there is enough in [the book] to the get the inner dialogue started." (Orange Community News)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781405167970
Publisher:
Wiley
Publication date:
11/28/2007
Pages:
240
Sales rank:
1,309,201
Product dimensions:
6.10(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.70(d)

What People are Saying About This

From the Publisher
"[T]here is much potential for the essays in Running and Philosophy to spark lively discussions among readers, [and] the impressive variety of topics…is enough for nearly anyone with a modicum of interest in both running and philosophy to justify reading it. In fact, I think this book is required reading for all those who find themselves with this combination of interests."
Thomas E. Gilbert, Sport, Ethics and Philosophy

"Every runner who has ever pondered the pleasure of pain, wondered about the duality of mind and body, or felt the artistic beauty of a perfect set of 800m repeats will enjoy this book."
Jonathan Beverly, Running Times

"Is running more a disease or a source of human liberation? Would Aristotle and Nietzsche both endorse running? Does running on a treadmill dehumanize us? For answers to these and other intriguing questions, you will need to read Running and Philosophy. It leads one on a rich, varied, and enjoyable journey."
R. Scott Kretchmar, Penn State University

Meet the Author

Michael W. Austin is an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Eastern Kentucky University. A member of the International Association for the Philosophy of Sport, Austin has been published in Journal for the Philosophy of Sport, Southwest Philosophy Review, The Journal of Value Inquiry, Philosophy and Theology, and International Philosophical Quarterly. He is also the author of Conceptions of Parenthood: Ethics and the Family (2007).

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Running and Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Skitch41 More than 1 year ago
Though I have read very few pop culture & philosophy books all the way through, this is one of the best ones I have read. Not only do many of the essays connect to well known philosophers and ideas, but many other essays seem very original in their thesis and their conclusions. The best part about this book, though, is that nearly all of essays are easily relatable as anyone who has ever done even a short mile or 5K race can instantly understand what the author is talking about when they mention something about running. It doesn't hurt that many of the best authors seem to be runners themselves and imbue their essays with their own personal experiences. However, at times the book suffers from what many pop culture & philosophy books suffer from: essays and ideas that are not explained very well and go way over the heads of the readers. One essay in particular started talking about "zombies" without explaining what he was talking about. It took me half of the essay to figure out what he meant. Overall, while this book won't make you a better runner or be as necessary as a good pair of running shoes, but the topics discussed will keep you thinking on those long runs.