Rural Poverty: Special Causes and Policy Reforms

Overview

This volume takes the unexplored and timely approach of studying the differences between the rural and urban poor. The studies presented conclude that rural poverty is more likely than its urban counterpart to be caused by inadequate unemployment compensation, rising unemployment, depression in the agricultural sector (the farm crisis), and discriminatory welfare regulations. As well as establishing the differences, the contributors elucidate the alternate strategies necessary to reach this less visible but ...

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Overview

This volume takes the unexplored and timely approach of studying the differences between the rural and urban poor. The studies presented conclude that rural poverty is more likely than its urban counterpart to be caused by inadequate unemployment compensation, rising unemployment, depression in the agricultural sector (the farm crisis), and discriminatory welfare regulations. As well as establishing the differences, the contributors elucidate the alternate strategies necessary to reach this less visible but equally needy group. They also suggest alternate reforms designed to mitigate poverty in rural America.

Inequitable treatment of the rural poor is evidenced by the fact that although, by conventional measures at least, poverty rates are higher in rural than in urban regions of this country, the rural poor are far less likely to receive assistance. One significant reason is that the rural poor are more often employed and more likely to have assets that make them ineligible for benefits. This is only one of several indications that rural poverty requires specifically tailored programs to address its unique causes and problems. The work begins with an examination of ways of measuring poverty and goes on to look at the utilization of welfare programs. Two essays are then devoted to the role of the labor force. The work concludes with three approaches to reform. An index and a bibliography complete the volume, which will provide fresh research and insights for courses in poverty, rural sociology, and rural economic development.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

HARRELL R. RODGERS, JR., is a Professor of Political Science at the University of Houston.

GREGORY WEIHER is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at the University of Houston.

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Table of Contents

Introduction

Rural and Urban Poverty: An Income/Net Worth Approach

Rural-Urban Differences in the Utilization and Ameliorative Effects of Welfare Programs

Labor Force Participation and Poverty Status among Rural and Urban Women Who Head Families

Impacts of the Farm Financial Crisis of the 1980s on Resources and Poverty in Agriculturally Dependent Counties in the United States

Rural Poverty, Welfare Eligibility, Farm Programs, and the Negative Income Tax

Can Income Transfers Promote Economic Development in Poor, Rural Communities?

Rural Economic Development Policies for the Midwestern States

Bibliography

Index

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