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Rush -- Clockwork Angels: Authentic Guitar TAB
     

Rush -- Clockwork Angels: Authentic Guitar TAB

4.0 1
by Rush
 

Rush's 19th studio album features all the classic elements that have endeared the band to several generations of fans and made them the most successful progressive rock group of all time! The book contains all the songs faithfully transcribed in authentic guitar TAB, beautiful full-color artwork, and a complete lyrics section. Titles: Caravan
• BU2B

Overview


Rush's 19th studio album features all the classic elements that have endeared the band to several generations of fans and made them the most successful progressive rock group of all time! The book contains all the songs faithfully transcribed in authentic guitar TAB, beautiful full-color artwork, and a complete lyrics section. Titles: Caravan
• BU2B
• Clockwork Angels
• The Anarchist
• Carnies
• Halo Effect
• Seven Cities of Gold
• The Wreckers
• Headlong Flight
• BU2B2
• Wish Them Well
• The Garden.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780739091746
Publisher:
Alfred Music
Publication date:
08/06/2012
Pages:
124
Sales rank:
963,281
Product dimensions:
11.70(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.40(d)

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Rush -- Clockwork Angels: Authentic Guitar TAB 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
FlyingPigSP More than 1 year ago
I’m a Rush fan and an avid reader. That is the main reason I wanted to read this book. After listening to the latest Rush album, Clockwork Angels, it was obvious that the song lyrics told a story. Although typical to many albums of this nature, it did not tell the complete story, only what would fit lyrically along with the music in order to make a coherent musical recording. So when I heard that Kevin J. Anderson was writing a book based on the story told by the songs on the album, I naturally felt compelled to read it. I really didn’t expect the book itself to be anything beyond mediocre when standing on its own – in other words, when not being read by a Rush fan or at least a fan of the album. Surprisingly, I found the book Clockwork Angels to be thoroughly enjoyable not because it was based on an album by a band I am a fan of, but rather because it is a very well written thought provoking story. In general, Clockwork Angels is a coming of age story that revolves around the main character, Owen Hardy, who has grown up in a steampunk world parallel to our own, where life is very structured with all aspects of it planned out for you by The Watchmaker and the Clockwork Angels. It is a peaceful existence where everyone accepts their place without question. But Owen is a dreamer who longs for something more. And he gets it, in many ways he never dreamt possible. Through his adventures, the story compares the benefits and pitfalls of two extreme philosophical views of social structure. Eventually the ideology of a well-structured society that allows very little personal choice and the concept of complete freedom for the individual to do as they choose with no governing intervention are pitted against each other. This underlying theme provided much depth to the story and made it far more interesting than the simple story presented on the surface. Overall, the story is well written. The main characters and settings are well developed in the beginning of the book, which tends to make the first half move a bit slower than the latter part. But this was probably necessary in order to have the reader grasp the differences between the steampunk world in which the story takes place and our own -in some ways it is more technologically advanced than our world, in other ways, it far behind us – and to delve into what it is that motivates the main characters. Author Kevin J. Anderson does an excellent job of keeping the philosophical aspects more subliminal, making it feel more like a story of adventure than something more philosophically thought provoking. He also avoids lending any bias to either of the extreme views, leaving it up to the reader to reach their own conclusions. As a longtime fan of the band Rush, it was entertaining to find lyrical references to many of their songs scattered throughout the story. Unfortunately, I found this overall, to somewhat detract from the story, At times seeming to be forced in where they didn’t fit ad well as some other dialogue might have. This may be because as a long time Rush fan, I am overly familiar with Neal Peart’s lyrics, making them stand out to me more than they would to someone else. Still, that is the only negative I can say about what is otherwise a very entertaining, insightful and well written book - one that any avid reader will enjoy, whether they are a Rush fan or not.