Rush for the Gold: Mystery at the Olympics (The Sports Beat, 6) [NOOK Book]

Overview

New York Times bestselling sportswriter John Feinstein dives headfirst into a scandal of Olympic proportions in this exciting sports mystery.
 
Teen sports reporter Susan Carol is competing as a swimmer at her first-ever Olympic games. It’s the opportunity of a lifetime, and her best friend Stevie is both amazed and envious. Usually they cover sporting events together, now he’s covering her. But Stevie can’t shake the feeling that ...
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Rush for the Gold: Mystery at the Olympics (The Sports Beat, 6)

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Overview

New York Times bestselling sportswriter John Feinstein dives headfirst into a scandal of Olympic proportions in this exciting sports mystery.
 
Teen sports reporter Susan Carol is competing as a swimmer at her first-ever Olympic games. It’s the opportunity of a lifetime, and her best friend Stevie is both amazed and envious. Usually they cover sporting events together, now he’s covering her. But Stevie can’t shake the feeling that something’s not right. Everyone wants a piece of Susan Carol’s success—agents, sponsors, the media. Just how far will they go to ensure that America’s newest Olympic darling wins gold?
 
John Feinstein has been praised as “the best writer of sports books in America today” (The Boston Globe), and he proves it again in this fast-paced novel.

From the Hardcover edition.

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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 6–9—The sports-journalism duo of Susan Carol Anderson and Stevie Thomas is embroiled in cracking another mystery. This time the story takes place at the 2012 Olympics. Fifteen-year-old Susan Carol is competing in the games as a swimmer on Team USA while Stevie, her boyfriend, is covering the events for the Washington Herald. Susan Carol's good looks and athletic ability catch the eye of Lighting Fast, an agency that mesmerizes her father with promises of millions of dollars in contracts if his daughter can win the gold. When members of Lighting Fast are seen mingling with one of Susan Carol's competitors, she and Stevie's suspicions about the agency intensify. While she focuses on swimming, Stevie is forced to crack the case on his own. He uncovers Lightning Fast's plot to bribe officials to ensure that Susan Carol's less attractive, yet equally talented teammate does not win, jeopardizing the agency's opportunity to market Susan Carol for millions. Disappointingly, the action doesn't really heat up until the last few chapters. Readers may find the large cast of undeveloped secondary characters difficult to keep track of, and the plot gets bogged down with details about the world of competitive swimming. Still, the novel is timed to hit shelves before the 2012 London Olympics and it provide readers with a seemingly realistic and interesting behind-the-scenes glimpse at the Games.—Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CT
From the Publisher
Booklist, May 1, 2012:
"As in his earlier books in the series, the popular Feinstein takes readers inside a major sports venue, supplies fascinating details, and serves up a satisfying mystery."

Kirkus Reviews, April 1, 2012:
"As is his wont, Feinstein salts the cast with real athletes and other figures from Michael Phelps to Bob Costas. He folds plenty of dramatic sports action as well as behind-the-scenes banter and personal and family conflict into a plot that moves smoothly to a suspenseful climax...A fast-paced caper."

VOYA - Heather Christensen
Once again, teen sports writers Susan Carol and Stevie find themselves uncovering sports-related shenanigans, but this time Susan Carol is not working as a journalist—she is a participating athlete. When she won the 200 butterfly at the World Championships, she not only became a contender for the coveted spot on the Olympic team, but she also caught the eye of corporate sponsors who are willing to pay her handsomely to promote their athletic gear...providing she wins, of course. Now, Stevie is covering for his girlfriend and former partner as she sets her sights on the gold. The two quickly discover that the enormous amount of money available for the fastest swimmers—especially the attractive ones—creates an attitude of winning at any cost. Even worse, Susan Carol's own father seems to be under the money spell, which adds considerably to her stress and frustration. Feinstein's vast experience in the world of sports (sometimes evidenced by name-dropping with reckless abandon) gives credibility and immediacy to the story. Although the mystery appears fairly late in the story, teens will be too caught up in the drama of Susan Carol's rise in the swimming world to mind too much. The behind-the-scenes look at agents and corporate sponsors may cause sports enthusiasts to think differently about the world of athletics and particularly popular venues like the Olympics. While fans of Susan Carol and Stevie will be sure to enjoy their latest adventure, the story stands easily on its own, so familiarity with the series is not required. Reviewer: Heather Christensen
Kirkus Reviews
Feinstein's latest tale of chicanery in big-time sports sends teen journalist Stevie Thomas to London to cover the Olympics, where his usual partner Susan Carol is swimming for gold. A win at the Worlds has turned Susan Carol into a national celebrity and brought a whirl of lucrative marketing deals her way. It has also put her at odds with her father, who has fallen thoroughly under the influence of pushy agent J.P. Scott. Stevie covers the progress of his beautiful, brilliant, talented girlfriend for a Washington paper as she makes her way through the Olympics Trials and then the early heats in London. He begins to smell a rat when he spots an associate of J.P.'s meeting with a hot-looking Russian swimmer who is competing against her. A slimy marketer's careless comment later, Stevie knows the fix is in. As is his wont, Feinstein salts the cast with real athletes and other figures from Michael Phelps to Bob Costas. He folds plenty of dramatic sports action as well as behind-the-scenes banter and personal and family conflict into a plot that moves smoothly to a suspenseful climax. Though the evidence fingering a bribed Olympics judge is rather conveniently obtained, both the crime and the marketing pressures behind it are thoroughly believable. A fast-paced caper, with plenty to offer fans of both the Games and the less savory "games." (Mystery. 10-14)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780375984556
  • Publisher: Random House Children's Books
  • Publication date: 5/22/2012
  • Series: Sports Beat
  • Sold by: Random House
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 62,593
  • Age range: 10 years
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

JOHN FEINSTEIN is the author of many bestselling books, including A Season on the Brink and A Good Walk Spoiled. His books for young readers offer a winning combination of sports, action, and intrigue, with Last Shot receiving the Edgar Allan Poe Award for best young adult mystery of the year. He lives in Potomac, Maryland, and Shelter Island, New York, with his family.
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Read an Excerpt

1: THE MAKING OF A CHAMPION

From somewhere off in the distance, Susan Carol Anderson thought she heard her father’s voice, which wasn’t possible because her head was underwater and she was searching for one last spark of energy to close the ten-meter gap between her and the wall. And yet, even though she knew she couldn’t possibly hear his voice this clearly, there it was again.

“Susan Carol, sweetheart; are you listening?”

She was in lane six in a swimming pool in Shanghai, China, and yet she kept hearing her dad’s voice, almost as if they were back home in Goldsboro, North Carolina, sitting in their living room.

“Susan Carol, snap out of it.”

That’s when it hit her. She was sitting in her living room in Goldsboro. Shanghai was thousands of miles away and nine months in her past. She had drifted off into her own safe little world in the pool while her dad was talking to the three people seated across from her.

And now her father was looking at her expectantly, which was a problem since she had no idea what he was expecting. Finally, the man seated directly across from her, whose name she remembered was Jeffrey Paul Scott--“call me J.P.,” he had said, walking in the door--gave her a clue.

“You don’t have to decide anything now, Susan Carol,” he was saying in a soothing voice. “We just want you and your dad to have an idea of where this could all go. We aren’t in the business of trying to pitch fantasies; we try to tell people what to expect realistically. In your case, the sky’s the limit, but even if you don’t hit the sky, the bar is pretty high.”

Susan Carol nodded because that felt like it was the right thing to do. She looked back at the coffee table and all the brightly colored folders that J.P. and his two partners--William Arnold (she was to call him Bill) and Susie McArthur--had laid out in front of them. One was labeled Swimming Sponsors, another said Beauty Sponsors, a third said Teen Sponsors, and a fourth said modestly How Lightning Fast Will Make Susan Carol Anderson a Star.

Maybe it was that one that had sent her spinning back in time to that amazing week in Shanghai last summer. She had gone to China hoping to swim the meet of her life. She never dreamed that succeeding would completely change her life.

Her father was talking again. “Susan Carol, I think J.P., Bill, and Susie understand that this is a lot for a fifteen-year-old to digest in one evening,” he said. “Actually, it’s a lot for a forty-six-year-old to digest in one evening.”

As if on cue, J.P., Bill, and Susie laughed as though her father was David Letterman and Jimmy Kimmel rolled into one.

“Your dad’s right,” Susie said. “All we really want to know is if any of this makes sense to you, and if not, what would make sense to you. Our job is to make sure you’re comfortable with all this.”

In that case, Susan Carol thought, please take your folders, and let me go back to being a fifteen-year-old girl who loves to swim and loves to be a sportswriter. She thought of something one of her heroes, Duke basketball coach Mike Krzyzewski, had said: “When you’re growing up, you train to be an athlete. Then you train to be a coach. But you never train to be a celebrity.”

She hadn’t trained to be a celebrity and, having had brushes with it in the past, had no real interest in it. But the dollar figures that the Lightning Fast trio had been throwing around were stunning. Even her father, who had some experience in the world of professional athletes, had been wide-eyed. Speedo was willing to guarantee $1 million for the first year, including a $500,000 signing bonus, with another four years open to negotiation depending on how she did in London. That didn’t include any of the performance bonuses written into the contract. Nike was interested and so was Dove. Not to mention Under Armour, the Disney Channel, and--this one she knew would make Stevie Thomas, her closest friend, gag--Seventeen magazine.

The Andersons weren’t poor by any means. Susan Carol’s dad made a solid living as a minister at the local Episcopal church, and her mother made decent money teaching freshman English at Goldsboro High School. But being the second of four children, all of whom were absolutely going to college if their parents had their way, Susan Carol knew that every added dollar helped. Now the Lightning Fast people were sitting in front of them saying that she could sign her name to a piece of paper and take care of all four kids’ college tuitions--and perhaps a lot more.

“I’m a little overwhelmed,” she finally said when it felt as if everyone in the room had been staring at her for hours. “I mean, this is incredible, what you’re talking about. It just sounds too good to be true.”

“But it is true,” J.P. said. “This is what these companies think about you and your potential. These are just starting points we’re talking about right now because we don’t want to get ahead of ourselves. If London goes well, that’s when that sky-high scenario kicks in.”

London, Susan Carol thought. My God, the London Olympics are less than five months away. The trials are less than--she almost gasped out loud at the thought--fifteen weeks away! How could all of this be happening so fast? A year ago the idea of making a national team was a fantasy. Now all this. The grown-ups were talking again--bonuses, roll-over deals, options. Her mind retreated to the pool; no, actually she was back a bit further in time. . . .

It had been at a Grand Prix meet in Charlotte that she had gone from being a solid age-group swimmer to a national contender.

She had expected to swim well in Charlotte. In fact, she had been fairly certain she was going to blow past her previous best times. Between the ages of fourteen and fifteen she had filled out and put a good deal more muscle on her body, going from a lean five-eleven and 135 pounds to a rock-solid six feet and 150. She was grateful that she’d only grown another inch but even happier knowing she now had the strength she needed to finish off a 200-meter butterfly.

Even so, she had been stunned when she realized on the final length that she was not only ahead of her longtime nemesis, Becky Ausmus, but was pulling away from her. And she wasn’t dying. Even in her best 200-fly races in the past, her arms felt as if there were weights inside them as she got close to the flags. This time was different. Ten meters out, even though she could feel the pain of her effort from head to toe, she knew she wasn’t going to die, that the proverbial piano was landing on someone else’s back, not hers.

When she hit the wall, she could hear shrieks coming from her teammates. Pushing her goggles up, she glanced at the electronic timing board and gasped in disbelief. The time next to her lane said 2:08.55. She looked around to see if it was possible that anyone else had somehow beaten her and their time had been recorded for her lane. No, that wasn’t it.

She had never gone faster than 2:19.05 for a 200 in her life. She had been hoping with her new size and strength to break 2:15--which would have been huge. This was impossible--a drop of more than ten seconds?

Still gasping, she looked up at her coach, Ed Brennan, who had the widest smile she had ever seen.

“The time?” she managed to say.

Ed held up his stopwatch. “It’s right,” he said. “You beat Ausmus by almost five seconds. You might be going to the Worlds after that swim.”

It turned out he was right. Only one American swimmer, Teresa Crippen, had produced a time faster than hers in the past twelve months. Each country was allowed two swimmers per event in the Worlds, and Susan Carol’s swim in Charlotte qualified her as the second American in the 200 fly. Her 100-fly time in Charlotte, which had dropped almost four seconds from her previous best, didn’t earn a spot at the Worlds but did cause Ed to say something that stopped her cold.

“If you keep going like this, there’s no reason you can’t make the Olympic team in both the 100 and the 200,” he said. “You’re good enough if you really want to do it.”

Prior to Charlotte, Susan Carol’s goal had been to make the Olympic Trials. A trials swim would guarantee she’d be recruited by colleges. And her number one swimming goal had always been to get a college scholarship. Now she’d be going to the Olympic Trials and the World Championships.

The trip to China had been a blur. Susan Carol knew almost nothing about Shanghai and was stunned when she Googled it and found it was almost twice the size of New York City, with a population of 14 million. The pool was an indoor facility--which was good because the temperature was close to ninety almost every day they were there.

Frank Busch, who was coaching the American women, told her she had to conserve her strength in the heats and the semifinals. “You’ll only need to go about 2:12 or 2:13 in the heats,” he said. “Anything under 2:10 should be enough in the semis. You’re going to have to swim the 200 fly three times in three days. I’m guessing you’ve never done that before.”

She’d done it twice in two days on occasion but never three times. Still, she knew she was in the best shape of her life. Ed had made her do a set of five 200s on three minutes’ rest in practice before she’d left. It had hurt--really hurt--but she had felt okay, even after the last one. And sure enough, she cruised through the heats and the semifinals, qualifying fourth with a time of 2:09.12. She was amazed how easy that swim felt. Easy!

Liu Zige, the Chinese world record holder, had gone the fastest time in the semifinals: 2:05.99--well off her world record time of 2:01.81. She was in lane four. Teresa Crippen, the other American, had qualified second and was in lane five. And Susan Carol was next to her in lane six. Susan Carol planned to let Crippen pace her for the first 100 meters so she wouldn’t go out too fast. Crippen was too experienced to make that mistake.

Susan Carol followed that plan for fifty meters. But coming off the first wall, she could see she was already half a body length ahead of Crippen, and she had almost been holding back. She decided to just swim smoothly and not look around at all. She went into the routine she used in practice to try to keep her stroke steady: Nice and easy, she kept repeating with each two-stroke sequence. Nice . . . and easy . . .

At the halfway point, she felt as if she was just starting the race and could go 200 more meters if need be. Crippen was nowhere in sight, but as Susan Carol turned, she glanced over two lanes and saw that she was dead even with Liu. A little bit of fear crept through her. Was her mind fooling her body? Had she gone out too fast?

She could hear the building getting very loud as she and Liu churned through the third length. That wasn’t surprising: Liu was a national hero in China. Sometimes, though, a swimmer can actually hear a tone to the crowd. There is a difference between cheering and pleading. Susan Carol thought the crowd’s tone sounded as if someone was threatening Liu. She knew she wouldn’t see Liu on her last turn because she would turn her head away from her not toward her. That’s not important, she told herself. Holding your stroke and kicking hard for the last fifty is what’s important.

When she came off that final wall, though, she got a shock: As she pulled out of the turn and started to take her first stroke, she saw Crippen go by her heading toward the wall. That meant Susan Carol was at least ten meters ahead of her. Was something wrong with Crippen? Or was it possible that something was incredibly right with her?

Halfway home, she felt her arms start to tighten, but she still had energy left and she picked up her kick. She could now see the flags in front of her and the noise had become impossibly loud. Could she actually be in medal contention? Suddenly she was under the flags that marked five meters to go. She took one last breath, put her head down, and reached for the wall with her last bit of strength, just getting her fingertips on the timing pad without having to add an extra kick.

She surfaced in time to see that Liu was on the wall but others were just touching. Did I finish second? she wondered. Could that be possible? She heard shrieks from where the American team was sitting, and she pulled her goggles up and glanced over to see people jumping up and down and waving their arms. Becky Ausmus, who had made the team as a freestyle relay swimmer, was pointing at the scoreboard.

Susan Carol finally looked: She had gone 2:03.44. Liu had gone 2:03.46.

Crippen had actually rallied in the final length to finish third, way back at 2:05.85. Susan Carol couldn’t believe it.

She had WON the World Championship. The World Championship. Won. It.

Later she would find out that she had put up the second-fastest time any woman had ever gone in the history of US swimming.

Teresa Crippen had called it right then. She was leaning on the lane line, reaching to give Susan Carol a hug. “Do you realize what you’ve just done?” she said. “You’ve just become a star--a big star.”

Nine months later, sitting in her living room, Susan Carol could still hear Crippen’s voice. The question now was a little more complex: Just how big a star did she want to be?
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 32 )
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 32 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    Rush

    Same

    7 out of 16 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2012

    Amazing

    The end was a little fast but other than that it was stunning just like all of his other books

    7 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2012

    So good

    A must read for swimers

    5 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 6, 2012

    A good rad

    This lastbook was well written but the end was kinda fast. It was all basically a build up to what hhappenned in the last few chapters. Also there was no real scandal in this book like the others. I think that Feinstein wanted to have book out for the olyimpics but couldn't come up with a good scandal. Overall great read with the same witand drama as the others.

    5 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 21, 2012

    This is an amazing book.

    Tjis book is great for those who love to read about sport myseries and is great for those who love to read about swimming

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted August 9, 2012

    Hi there

    This nook is in the shape of a rectangle. I like rectangles.

    3 out of 14 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 10, 2012

    Spectacular read

    Loved it! Plz write another one soon i loved that mystery/romance/olypics

    3 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2013

    Amazing

    Next book should be NBA scandal.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 5, 2013

    Awesome!

    Definitely recommend. I am a swimmer and loved the swim talk! Awesome book!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2012

    will he write another book after this?

    will he write another book after this?

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 21, 2014

    Rush for the Gold

    This book is the best mystery book I have ever read!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 2, 2013

    #

    #I love this book it is my 2nd fav book of all time john is just so good i wanna read all of his books he is wicked supa

    #<3 feistein and boston
    #bostonstrong

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 13, 2013

    Swimming

    Awesome book recomend it to all swimmers

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2013

    Please read this

    I can honestly say that this book is good, not great though
    Susan Carol kind of seems like Missy Franklin
    I like the moral of the book but it is kind of cheesy
    Still,great book and I would definitely recommend this

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 1, 2013

    Love it!!!!!!

    This was a really good book!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 25, 2012

    Wow!!!!

    This was a fantastic read, and had a great plot. I myself am a swimmer, and i could relate to it very well. However, i feel that even if you arent a swimmer, you eill still find it an intriguing story line. I hope to tead some of Mr. John Feinstien's other books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2012

    When will this come out???

    When will this come out??

    1 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 12, 2014

    Beats

    I search my full name and i got olympics huh strange

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2014

    Rush For The Gold: Mystery At The 2012 London Summer Olympics By John Feinstein

    This book is very well written and I love all of John Feinsteins other sports mysteries including the one I own called Foul Trouble. I choose this book for my book club it is during the 2014 Sochi winter olympics. It kind of stinks that this book is not about the winter olympics but I was fine with it because I really wanted to read it. When my book club meets my mom and I are thinking about doing something with gold silver and bronze medals and I was thinking that eachi kid could choose which country the could be or which country they want to represent.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2012

    TERRIBLEZZZ Ter TERRIBLE

    Gosh i hate sports mysteries they are so overrated!! Why do they even make them golly gee

    0 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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