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Rush Hour
     

Rush Hour

5.0 1
by Christine Loomis, Mari Takabayashi (Illustrator)
 

This energetic book introduces numerous modes of transportation and captures a diverse array of people participating in the rhythm of the city workday, then reuniting with their families in the evening to eat dinner and discuss the day.

Overview


This energetic book introduces numerous modes of transportation and captures a diverse array of people participating in the rhythm of the city workday, then reuniting with their families in the evening to eat dinner and discuss the day.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Loaded with details for kids to pore over, the pictures, which often cleverly overlap on the page, catch the colorful energy of urban- and suburbanites on the move. . . . A loving, comforting book for grownups to share with their children." Booklist, ALA
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This picture book follows the rhythms of a work day in New York City, from the first stirrings of the morning to the moment when parents and children are joyfully reunited in the evening. The main focus, of course, is the bustle of rush hour: the whirl of people crowding into subway cars, cars cascading over bridges and crowds swelling out of Grand Central resembles a three-ring circus. Loomis's (The Hippo Hop) concise, rhyming text evokes a cheerful diversity of people"Out their doors/ Go moms and dads,/ Lugging tools/ Or books and pads"and the chaotic sounds and sights of rush hour, "Rumbling,/ Roaring,/ Jiggling,/ Jumping,/ Left turn,/ Right turn,/ Backing,/ Bumping." Takabayashi's (Baby's Things) engaging watercolors are a kaleidoscope of color, pattern and activity. Presented as a multiplicity of panels, the illustrations offer seemingly inexhaustible, enjoyable details: one patchwork of pictures depicts people decorating cakes, delivering mail, teaching aerobics and more, their simple faces showing a remarkable range of expression. Rather than focusing on one individual or family, this lovely book opens young readers up to a wide, complex, but still reassuring world. It may well instill a love of the kinetic vibrancy of urban life. Ages 3-8. (Sept.)
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2The author of One Cow Coughs (Ticknor & Fields, 1994) teams up with a relatively new illustrator to show children how their parents get to and from work: "Running, jumping onto trains,/Subways, buses,/Boats, and planes,/Taxis, bikes,/A car-pool van,/Cars of blue and red and tan...." Takabayashi sets this morning and evening ritual in New York City, with scenes of antlike crowds in Grand Central Station; slow traffic on the Brooklyn Bridge; ferries, subways, and sidewalks jammed with commuters. The illustrations, naive, delicate watercolors in small cartouches that occasionally coalesce into spread-filling melanges of color, effectively capture the hustle and bustle of it all. A couple of things aren't quite right: the ethnic representation is unbalanced and New Yorkers will laugh at the idea that post-rush hour streets and trains are nearly deserted. The simple, energetic language and visuals are well matched, however, and the emphasis on transportation will please young fans of winged and wheeled vehicles. Pair this with Patricia Grossman's Night Ones (Harcourt, 1991) to remind readers that not everyone works 9 to 5, and that not all workers are mommies and daddies.John Peters, New York Public Library
Stephanie Zvirin
In crackling good rhyme, Loomis treats little ones to a peek at what moms and dads do when they go off to work each day. Filled with loads of good action words, the snappy text, which will have kids chanting right along, catches active parents "running, jumping / Onto trains / Subways, buses, boats, and planes" during their daytime travels. Takabayashi's wonderfully busy artwork is a fine match for the lively rhyme. Loaded with details for kids to pore over, the pictures, which often cleverly overlap on the page, catch the colorful energy of urban-and suburbanites on the move--heading out, at their jobs, then hurrying home again: "Doors swing open / Kids run fast / Moms and dads / Are home at last." A loving, comforting book for grown-ups to share with their children.
Kirkus Reviews
Rural readers unfamiliar with the pace of the urban rat race will be amused and enlightened by this excursion from suburbia to Manhattan as chronicled by Loomis (The Hippo Hop, 1995, etc.) and the astonishing Takabayashi. For a city children (and their parents, looking on), it may be too close to reality to be properly appreciated. The verse dashes through two rush hours ("Rumbling,/Roaring,/Jiggling,/Jumping"), as people in cars, buses, trains, buses, on foot, and on bikes participate in a mad scramble to get where they need to be in the morning and head frantically back home at night. In between, they are depicted working mostly without cheer at their jobs.

In this Koyaanisqatsi with words, the sheer number of busy illustrations is fatiguing, the pacing jars, and the repetition of blank, anonymous faces (or, more often, angry and obviously stressed visages) is frightening. While adults may appreciate the irony (intended or not), and children will gain a certain amount of gratification from poring over the crammed images, the book imparts a sense of harried hopelessness that's almost overwhelming.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780395691298
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/28/1996
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.25(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.12(d)
Age Range:
5 - 3 Years

Meet the Author


Mari Takabayashi was born in Tokyo, Japan, and studied at Otsuma Women’s College. She illustrated Flannel Kisses and Marshmallow Kisses and is the author and illustrator of I Live in Brooklyn and I Live in Toyko. She lives with her husband and their two children in New York.

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Rush Hour 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
MrsAlexander More than 1 year ago
My 4 yr. old son brought this book home from his school's library. I enjoyed reading this book to my children; the story line, illustrations and rhyming was great, and it was a great way of showing my children how people across the world live day to day. I am looking forward to purchasing this book.