Russell the Sheep

Russell the Sheep

4.3 17
by Rob Scotton
     
 

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This is Russell.

Sometimes Russell is just a little bit out of step with the rest of the flock.

All the sheep are falling asleep -- except Russell.

What's a sheep to do?

Russell tries everything...until, at last, he falls asleep. See more details below

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Overview

This is Russell.

Sometimes Russell is just a little bit out of step with the rest of the flock.

All the sheep are falling asleep -- except Russell.

What's a sheep to do?

Russell tries everything...until, at last, he falls asleep.

Editorial Reviews

Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books
"Visually humorous and texturally engaging, this sleepytime tale will win giggles and requests for rereadings at storytime."
Publishers Weekly
Humans who have trouble falling asleep have been known to count sheep. But what do insomniacs of the woolly-coated variety do? Russell, a sheep longing for shuteye, is on the case in this sweet-natured picture book. When all is quiet except for Russell, the playfully stocking-capped critter tries everything to lull himself into slumber. Making things darker doesn't help: "the really dark really scared him." And searching for a new place to get cozy is a bust, too. ("He tried the hollow of a tree./ That was too creepy!") At long last he gives counting a go: his feet, the stars in the sky-and ultimately, sheep-to fine effect. British native Scotton's children's book debut blends silly and warm into the kind of package that appeals to a broad age range. His stylized sheep-all fleecy white fluff atop matchstick-thin legs, with ping-pong-ball eyes-are simultaneously endearing and comic against a dark night-sky background. The compositions vary in perspective, and Scotton uses spot illustrations to pick up the pace, and framed full-spread paintings when Russell takes a pause. This fresh-feeling bedtime story about one animal's restless ramblings should prove an entertaining send-off-to-the-Sandman for young readers. Ages 3-7. (Apr.) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
This wound-up sheep can not find his way to sleep. The dark scares him in a quiet meadow, his wool overheats him. Neither exercise, a pillow, nor change of location helps. Only after counting "six hundred million billion and ten stars" does the weary lambkin decide to count sheep. That does the trick. When the others rise, Russell still sleeps soundly. Simple words, soft blue hues, and comical illustrations ease pre-sleep tension. 2005, HarperCollins, Ages 3 to 6.
—Susie Wilde
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 1-Russell can't sleep. While the other sheep are dozing off, he ponders the problem of insomnia. Is he too hot or too cold? Perhaps a better place would help. When nothing works, he tries counting things. He starts with his feet, and then moves on to the stars ("six hundred million billion and ten")-twice. Finally, the quintessential clich comes to him, and he counts sheep. Russell nods off just as the new day dawns and the others awaken. Scotton makes a captivating debut with this comical tale. He illustrates it with a witty, engaging, and fluffy character bathed in calming blue hues. With his wide-eyed, startled expression; froggy sidekick; and animated, blue-and-white-striped nightcap, Russell will win the hearts of readers, who will want to look at the pictures over and over to catch all the clever detail.-Be Astengo, Alachua County Library, Gainesville, FL Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Scotton makes a stylish debut with this tale of a sleepless sheep-depicted as a blocky, pop-eyed, very soft-looking woolly with a skinny striped nightcap of unusual length-trying everything, from stripping down to his spotted shorts to counting all six hundred million billion and ten stars, twice, in an effort to doze off. Not even counting sheep . . . well, actually, that does work, once he counts himself. Dawn finds him tucked beneath a rather-too-small quilt while the rest of his flock rises to bathe, brush and riffle through the Daily Bleat. Russell doesn't have quite the big personality of Ian Falconer's Olivia, but more sophisticated fans of the precocious piglet will find in this art the same sort of daffy urbanity. Quite a contrast to the usual run of ovine-driven snoozers, like Phyllis Root's Ten Sleepy Sheep, illustrated by Susan Gaber (2004). (Picture book. 6-8)
New York Times Book Review
“A hilarious woolly insomniac…adorably funny…[A] runaway hit.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Visually humorous and texturally engaging, this sleepytime tale will win giggles and requests for rereadings at storytime.”
The Bulletin for the Center for Children's Books
“Visually humorous and texturally engaging, this sleepytime tale will win giggles and requests for rereadings at storytime.”
Bulletin of the Center for Children’s Books
“Visually humorous and texturally engaging, this sleepytime tale will win giggles and requests for rereadings at storytime.”

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780060598488
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
04/12/2005
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
318,747
Product dimensions:
10.00(w) x 10.00(h) x 0.25(d)
Lexile:
AD300L (what's this?)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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