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Russia and the Republics Legal Materials

Overview

This installment marks the end of the First Series of the Looseleaf Service, created and edited by John N. Hazard (1909-96) and Vratislav Pechota (d. 2005), both at Columbia University, and the commencement of the Second Series. All materials in the First Series are now of archival value and should be retained for that purpose.

The Second Series will differ from its predecessor in two key respects. First, all...

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Overview

This installment marks the end of the First Series of the Looseleaf Service, created and edited by John N. Hazard (1909-96) and Vratislav Pechota (d. 2005), both at Columbia University, and the commencement of the Second Series. All materials in the First Series are now of archival value and should be retained for that purpose.

The Second Series will differ from its predecessor in two key respects. First, all texts in the Second Series have been translated by the editor. Second, the subject order of the Second Series will be more detailed than previously, although identical for each of the twelve jurisdictions concerned.

The translations are based on English-language equivalents drawn from the author's more than forty years of experience in producing scholarly translations of Soviet, Russian, and other CIS legal materials in the English language, including as Editor of the quarterly journal Soviet Statutes and Decisions, as founder and editor of the quarterly law review Sudebnik, as editor of the twice-yearly journal Russian Law: Theory and Practice published by the Russian Academy of Legal Sciences, of several looseleaf services, together with major legal treatises by Russian and other CIS legal scholars and the principal codes of law.

Insofar as possible the translations follow literally the original Russian version and employ the vocabulary in W. E. Butler, Russian-English Legal Dictionary (Moscow, Zertsalo, 2001).

The era of law reform which Russia and other CIS countries are experiencing has been accompanied by no less momentous changes in legal terminology, as the terminological and conceptual foundations of Soviet Law are discarded, refined, or replacedby those of a market economy and democratic form of rule. Against the fabric of Russian legal history, the current period may be regarded as the third major revolution in Russian legal terminology: the first introduced by the westernization policies of Peter the Great; and the second by the October Revolution of 1917. New terms are being absorbed or devised to reflect institutions and concepts of a market economy previously alien to or even illegal in Russian society. Others reflect the worldwide process of the approximation, harmonization, and unification of national, regional, and other legal orders.

Legal translation is the very foundation of Comparative Law. Insofar as legal translation is accurate, the application of the comparative method to the study of legal phenomena is, in principle, conceivable. When legal translation is no longer translation, that is, no longer an accurate description of the legal phenomena under consideration but rather an attempt to re-dress or to re-characterize the terminology of one legal system in the costume of another, the description is inaccurate and, for scholarly and professional purposes, useless.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781578232215
  • Publisher: Juris Publishing, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 1/28/2006
  • Edition number: 2

Meet the Author

William E. Butler, FSA, formerly of University College London, is the John Edward Fowler Distinguished Professor of Law at Penn State University's Dickinson School of Law.

An authority on the legal systems of Russia and former Soviet nations, he is the author, co-author, editor or translator of more than 120 books and over 200 articles on Russian, Soviet, Ukrainian and other Commonwealth of Independent States legal systems. He also edits the journal Russian Law, published by the Russian Academy of Legal Sciences. He has acted as Counsel to the EBRD, European Union, World Bank, United Nations, and Department for International Development of the United Kingdom on individual law reform projects.

Professor Butler formerly held a chair in comparative law at the University of London and is the founder and director of The Vinogradoff Institute, which now operates as a unit of Penn State Dickinson. Under Professor Butler's direction, the Institute coordinates research and teaching activities related to Russian and CIS legal systems and publishes the journal Sudebnik.

The recipient of numerous honors for his service to Russian and international law, Professor Butler is Academician of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences and has been elected to his third term as a member of the Russian International Court of Commercial Arbitration. In 2003, Professor Butler was awarded the G.I. Tunkin Medal by the Russian International Law Association.

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