The Russian Theatre after Stalin

Paperback (Print)
Buy New
Buy New from BN.com
$46.20
Used and New from Other Sellers
Used and New from Other Sellers
from $41.64
Usually ships in 1-2 business days
(Save 16%)
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (7) from $41.64   
  • New (4) from $46.23   
  • Used (3) from $41.64   

Overview

This is the first book to explore theater in Russia after Stalin. Through his work at the Moscow Art Theatre, Anatoly Smeliansky is in a key position to analyze contemporary events on the Russian stage and he combines this first-hand knowledge with valuable archival material. Smeliansky chronicles developments from 1953 and the rise of a new Soviet theater, highlighting the social and political events that shaped Russian drama and performance. The book also focuses on major directors and practitioners and contains a chronology, glossary of names, and informative illustrations.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"With fascinationg insight, the writer investigates how each director worked with and/or against the Soviet system..." New Theatre Quarterly

"A 'must read' for those in the field, offered by one of few people with the opportunity, intelligence, maturity and good sense to write it." Choice

"This is a story told by someone who was there in the rehearsal halls, in the meeting rooms, and the auditoria. It is often personal, often emotional, but always incisive account of those times, not so very far from the present." Essay in Theatre

"...a tremendous addition to the field of Russian theatre studies." Theatre Journal

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780521587945
  • Publisher: Cambridge University Press
  • Publication date: 8/28/2008
  • Series: Cambridge Studies in Modern Theatre Series
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 1,056,150
  • Product dimensions: 5.98 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 0.59 (d)

Table of Contents

List of plates
Foreword
Preface
Chronology
Biographical notes
Translator's note
1 The Thaw (1953-1968) 1
The mythology of socialist realism 1
Tolstoy and Dostoyevsky initiate a new Soviet theatre 9
The rise and fall of the Sovremennik Theatre 16
Yury Lyubimov and the birth of the Taganka Theatre 30
Where we came from: Tovstonogov's diagnosis 46
Within the bounds of tenderness (Efros in the sixties) 58
2 The Frosts (1968-1985) 74
Oleg Yefremov resuscitates the Art Theatre 75
Yury Lyubimov's 'black cross' 90
The man from outside (Efros in the seventies and eighties) 111
Georgy Tovstonogov: encapsulating 'stagnation' 126
3 The Black Box (1985-1997) 142
The paradoxes of freedom 142
The splitting of the Moscow Arts 147
Mark Zakharov and the King's games 155
Family portrait (Kama Ginkas and Geta Yanovskaya) 168
Having a body to be resurrected (Lev Dodin and
Anatoly Vasilyev) 180
Pyotr Fomenko's 'three cards' 202
Conclusion 212
Notes 217
Index 224
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)