The Saboteurs (Men at War Series #5)

The Saboteurs (Men at War Series #5)

2.8 43
by W. E. B. Griffin, William E. Butterworth IV
     
 

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W.E.B. Griffin continues his gripping Men at War series, featuring the legendary OSS.

As the Battle of the Atlantic rages, German U-boats are sinking U.S. vessels at will. Meanwhile, preparations are being made to invade Sicily and Italy. As the war heats up, "Wild Bill" Donovan and his secret agents find themselves battling on two fronts at once. And fate is

Overview

W.E.B. Griffin continues his gripping Men at War series, featuring the legendary OSS.

As the Battle of the Atlantic rages, German U-boats are sinking U.S. vessels at will. Meanwhile, preparations are being made to invade Sicily and Italy. As the war heats up, "Wild Bill" Donovan and his secret agents find themselves battling on two fronts at once. And fate is about to deal them a surprise that may doom them all.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Bestseller Griffin and his son, Butterworth, resuscitate Griffin's Men at War series, first published in paperback during the 1980s under the pseudonym Alex Baldwin and featuring the Office of Strategic Services; its fabled chief, Col. William J. "Wild Bill" Donovan; and OSS agent Maj. Richard M. Canidy. Two primary plot lines drive this new adventure: the U.S. preparation for the invasion of Sicily and mainland Italy in 1943, and the tale of four German saboteurs who have landed in America. The authors are heavily invested in their research, meticulously describing almost every element of life in the 1940s, to the detriment of the action. The German saboteurs are eventually dealt with, but the behind-the-lines Sicilian operation led by Canidy is only hastily outlined after a long buildup. One supposes that the Sicilian story that's promised but never delivered will appear in future installments. This is pretty much all show and no go, but readers who have a strong interest in WWII home-front history should be satisfied. Author tour. (June) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Library Journal

Griffin, author of many best-selling books (The Brotherhood of War, Badge of Honor), is joined by his son in continuing this well-received World War II OSS series. The Saboteursincludes several areas of historical interest: war profiteering, the desperate and fragile hold that the Americans had on the supply line to Europe, the sabotage performed by German intelligence agents while disguised as Americans in the heartland, the preparation for the Allied invasion of Sicily and then Italy, the American interaction with organized crime to aid in achieving war goals, and the men and women—some brave, some cowardly—who actually fought the war. From the Office of the President of the United States and the docks of New York to London's Blitz and occupied Sicily, the listener is taken on an adventure. The authors have a true gift for storytelling; one hopes this series continues for years to come. Read by David Colacci, this is highly recommended.
—Scott R. DiMarco

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780399153488
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
06/06/2006
Series:
Men at War Series, #5
Pages:
320
Product dimensions:
6.24(w) x 9.42(h) x 1.17(d)
Age Range:
14 Years

Meet the Author

W. E. B. Griffin is the author of seven bestselling series: The Corps, Brotherhood of War, Badge of Honor, Men at War, Honor Bound, Presidential Agent, and now Clandestine Operations. He lives in Fairhope, Alabama, and Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
 
William E. Butterworth IV has been a writer and editor for major newspapers and magazines for more than twenty-five years, and has worked closely with his father for several years on the editing of the Griffin books. He is the coauthor of several novels in the Badge of Honor, Men at War, Honor Bound, and Presidential Agent series. He lives in St. Petersburg, Florida.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Coppell, Texas
Date of Birth:
November 10, 1929
Place of Birth:
Newark, New Jersey

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The Saboteurs (Men at War Series #5) 2.9 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 44 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Griffin's 'upper crust go to war' formula is usually fairly entertaining, but in this work it is just plain dull. The plot is of the 'one thing lead to another and then the story ended' school, and the 'things' themselves are just not very interesting. I fear the old man is losing it and the son isn't up to the task of assuming his mantle. Read the first five 'Corps' books and skip this pale imitation.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I've read the previous books in the series and while they aren't the best books I've ever read, they at least had some sense of going somewhere. This one was all over the place and, as usual with the series, doesn't end, it just stops. It's as though the authors had to write a minimum number of words like a high school essay and when they reached the minimum they stopped. Too many plot lines are left hanging in mid-air. To those who wrote that they've 'loved' the previous books, I recommend Ludlum's 'Borne' books as a much better alternative.
Guest More than 1 year ago
In addition to poorly developed plot lines and wooden characters, the book contains some errors in research. For instance, J.Whit Stevens, a Philadelphia blueblood, worked in Philadelphia and ate 'gourmet' meals at the Union League of Philadelphia. In addition, Mr.Stevens and his relatives were supposed to have worked at Mellon Bank in Philadelphia (pp.115-116). This could not have been possible. Mellon was a Pittsburgh bank that only entered the Philadelphia market in 1982 when the State of PA authorized multi-bank holding companies and Mellon bought the Philadelphia-based Girard Bank.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Very disappointing to see Mr. W. E. B. Griffin's name shown as one of the author's. At the very best, this is a poor mimic of Griffin's style. I hope it the last.
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EWGroen More than 1 year ago
I have put this book down less than 100 pages in and will likely never pick it up again. And this from a guy who has read the Brotherhood of War, Corps and Presidential Agent series at least twice each. The inane level of detail is mind-numbing and would distract from even a good plot, which this book does not have. Clearly, Griffin lent only his name and not his talent or expertise to this undertaking. The subtle nuances Griffin uses to make his characters likable were missing and I didn't even recognize characters I had spent the previous 4 books getting to know. I am extremely disappointed and hesitant to even try to finish out the series - will I discover my friends from the first 4 books or more of the same from this book?
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