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Sacagawea (Scholastic I Am Series #1)
     

Sacagawea (Scholastic I Am Series #1)

4.3 6
by Grace Norwich, Anthony Vanarsdale (Illustrator)
 

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A brand-new biography series featuring some of the most important people from history and today.

I am only sixteen years old as I trek across the country with my infant son strapped to my back. I have a river, two lakes, and four mountain peaks named after me. I am featured on the U.S golden dollar. I am Sacagawea.

Learn all about this admirable woman, whose

Overview


A brand-new biography series featuring some of the most important people from history and today.

I am only sixteen years old as I trek across the country with my infant son strapped to my back. I have a river, two lakes, and four mountain peaks named after me. I am featured on the U.S golden dollar. I am Sacagawea.

Learn all about this admirable woman, whose accomplishments are truly inspiring, in the debut of Scholastic's new biography series: I AM. The series will feature full-color illustrated covers, one-color illustrations throughout, a timeline, an introduction to the people you'll meet in the book, maps, sidebars, and a top ten list of important things to know at the end of every book.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Sarah Maury Swan
Still a teenager, Sacagawea was married to a French Canadian trapper, Toussaint Charbonneau. She didn't have much say in the matter, but then most Native American women were considered chattel. Originally from the Lemhi Shoshone tribe, Sacagawea was kidnapped by the Hidatsa when she was about twelve years old. She didn't see her family until she helped explorers Lewis and Clark buy horses from her brother, the Lemhi chief. Following President Thomas Jefferson's orders to explore the newly acquired Louisiana Purchase territory, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark set out to map the new territory and to find a passage to the Pacific Ocean. But when the explorers hit Indian Territory, they decided to hire on a native guide to help them with negotiations and trade. Charbonneau arranged for Sacagawea to be that guide, for which he was handsomely rewarded, although it didn't do her much good. When the Corps of Discovery started out, Sacagawea carried her two-month old baby, Jean-Baptiste Charbonneau, on her back in a papoose. The group suffered many hardships; Sacagawea almost drowned and later almost died of fever, but she was instrumental in the success of the expedition. The forward of this book is told in Sacagawea's voice, leading the reader to expect the whole story to be told that way. It is a bit disconcerting to then discover the main part of the story is told in third person. Still, there's a lot of interesting information packed into an easy-to-read format. Reviewer: Sarah Maury Swan
School Library Journal
Gr 4�6—These books open with an introduction in the voice of the subject of the biography, followed by "People You Will Meet" and a chronology. Next, several chapters outline the main events in the subjects' lives', and end with "10 Things You Should Know About" and "10 MORE Things That Are Pretty Cool to Know." In Washington, readers get broad strokes regarding the man's childhood and years at Mount Vernon, and then follow the time line into his military career. Specific moments in his career and in American history are highlighted, often in sidebars. Sacagawea follows the same format, beginning with the young woman's life with the Lemhi Shoshone and including her capture and subsequent sale by the Hidasta. Her role as interpreter for Lewis and Clark is shown as important to the success of their journey. Both books have sketchlike illustrations throughout. One drawback in these volumes is in the design. The placement of text boxes often interrupts the flow of the text and leads to some flipping back and forth to get all of the information. For example, a box outlining Washington's prowess in math but failure in spelling is placed mid-sentence, leaving readers to either abandon the sentence about his brother or flip back once it is read. The time lines are oriented horizontally, rather than vertically. The overall effect of these design choices detracts from the presentations. The "Who Was" series (Grosset & Dunlap) may be a better first choice for school libraries.—Stacy Dillon, LREI, New York City

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780545405744
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
08/01/2012
Series:
I Am Series , #1
Pages:
128
Sales rank:
223,563
Product dimensions:
5.10(w) x 7.40(h) x 0.20(d)
Lexile:
NC1010L (what's this?)
Age Range:
8 - 10 Years

Meet the Author


Grace Norwich has written many books for young readers on a variety of topics, including health, fashion, animals, and more. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Anthony VanArsdale has worked as a professional illustrator since 2004. He works mostly by combining traditional and digital media. You can learn more about Anthony at www.anthonyvanarsdale.com.

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Sacagawea 4.3 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is great
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really think this is a awsome book and that everyone should read this.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Sacagawea is so cool because she is cool. I read this book once and I will read it again. OMG I love her
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Blah
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I might only be saying that, because I am 1/16 Lakota Sioux, but from the reviews on here, indians weren't so bad. Most that were in battles didn't deserve to die! Like Tecumseh! Or any other NA leader! (Native American Leader)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Im studing idaho history in school so i think this i realy cool