Sacred Blood, Sacred Image: The Sudarim of Oviedo

Sacred Blood, Sacred Image: The Sudarim of Oviedo

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by Janice Bennett
     
 

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Revised Edition

This is the story of the Sudarium of Oviedo, an ancient bloodstained cloth, believed to have covered the head of Jesus of Nazareth after his crucifixion. The author traces the known history of the linen and presents the up-to-date conclusions of EDICES. The investigative team that has been studying the cloth since 1989, discusses the

Overview

Revised Edition

This is the story of the Sudarium of Oviedo, an ancient bloodstained cloth, believed to have covered the head of Jesus of Nazareth after his crucifixion. The author traces the known history of the linen and presents the up-to-date conclusions of EDICES. The investigative team that has been studying the cloth since 1989, discusses the cultural significance of the crucifixion and blood in the context of first-century Jerusalem. They demonstrate the significance of the famous passage of John 20:5-7, as analyzed by some of the most important Biblical scholars of the world. The book contains twenty pages of color photographs, many of which are from EDICES. These photographs explain visually the bloodstains and wrinkles found on the cloth, how the cloth was used, its comparison with the Shroud of Turin and the historical odyssey from Jerusalem to Spain.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781586171117
Publisher:
Ignatius Press
Publication date:
09/28/2005
Edition description:
Revised
Pages:
223
Sales rank:
623,259
Product dimensions:
6.25(w) x 9.25(h) x (d)

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Sacred Blood, Sacred Image: The Sudarim of Oviedo 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 0 reviews.
FrancescaFB More than 1 year ago
SACRED BLOOD, SACRED IMAGE is focused on the Sudarium of Oviedo, one of the cloths used on the face and head of Jesus Christ as he was taken down from His cross, and then transported to His tomb by Joseph of Arimathea, Nicodemus, and the Apostle John. It was saturated with Jesus’ blood and post-mortem fluids, and removed from His face once the anointing and burial process began. It was found in the tomb of Jesus, on the morning of the Resurrection, but found separate from the other burial cloths, including the Shroud of Turin. What is disappointing is that a more extensive and thorough analysis of the Sudarium of Oviedo has been limited due to the Sudarium being sequestered in Spain for so many years. The text adequately details the research done in determining a direct link to the Shroud of Turin, including blood type match (AB), and image match; however, the details of the superimposition were too vague and brief. The history of the Sudarium of Oviedo’s travels is also reviewed in depth. What should have been included in this writing is reference to the Cloth of Manoppello. It was a thin handkerchief-sized veil placed on top of the Shroud of Turin at the time of the burial, and also shows the facial image of Jesus Christ. When this cloth was also superimposed upon the face in the Shroud of Turin, it matches perfectly. By including all three burial cloths of Jesus Christ, it would have supported this analysis much further.