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Sacred Games: A Novel
     

Sacred Games: A Novel

3.9 22
by Vikram Chandra
 

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Seven years in the making, Sacred Games is an epic of exceptional richness and power. Vikram Chandra's novel draws the reader deep into the life of Inspector Sartaj Singh—and into the criminal underworld of Ganesh Gaitonde, the most wanted gangster in India.

Sartaj, one of the very few Sikhs on the Mumbai police force, is used to being

Overview

Seven years in the making, Sacred Games is an epic of exceptional richness and power. Vikram Chandra's novel draws the reader deep into the life of Inspector Sartaj Singh—and into the criminal underworld of Ganesh Gaitonde, the most wanted gangster in India.

Sartaj, one of the very few Sikhs on the Mumbai police force, is used to being identified by his turban, beard and the sharp cut of his trousers. But "the silky Sikh" is now past forty, his marriage is over and his career prospects are on the slide. When Sartaj gets an anonymous tip-off as to the secret hide-out of the legendary boss of G-Company, he's determined that he'll be the one to collect the prize.

Vikram Chandra's keenly anticipated new novel is a magnificent story of friendship and betrayal, of terrible violence, of an astonishing modern city and its dark side. Drawing inspiration from the classics of nineteenth-century fiction, mystery novels, Bollywood movies and Chandra's own life and research on the streets of Mumbai, Sacred Games evokes with devastating realism the way we live now but resonates with the intelligence and emotional depth of the best of literature.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780061807268
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
10/13/2009
Sold by:
HARPERCOLLINS
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
992
Sales rank:
542,297
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Vikram Chandra is the author of the novel Red Earth and Pouring Rain (Commonwealth Writers' Prize; David Higham Prize), and the short story collection Love and Longing in Bombay (Commonwealth Writers' Prize; New York Times Notable Book). Born in New Delhi, he divides his time between Mumbai and Berkeley, where he teaches at the University of California.

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Sacred Games 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 22 reviews.
Dyerfan More than 1 year ago
The author presupposes that one has a familiarity with Indian Culture and words. When he said that something smelled like Gur, I had no idea if that was good or bad (is it sweet food or excrement?) and that's just one of many examples. I found that it was just too difficult googling words so often and that took away from my reading enjoyment. I don't always read near a computer. I read books to learn something or to enjoy the reading experience for entertainment. The plot and characters of Sacred Games were so interesting that I wish I could read the rest of the story, but alas, I'm giving the book away.
Guest More than 1 year ago
As huge as this novel is, it still surprises me that the author managed to put this much story into 900 pages. I saw at least 3 distinct novels in this piece, but I am glad that it is all combined in one volume. Vikram Chandra has amazing talent, and leaves no stone unturned in his writing. This novel is impressive, well written, and thought provoking. A great effort from a great author.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I must day that I could not finish Vikram Chandra's first novel 'Red Earth and Pouring Rain'. This one is fantastic, there is no other word to describe it at all.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Good book.
LovestoReadinIndiana More than 1 year ago
Just started reading this huge novel and wanted to let future readers (and Dyerfan) know that there is a glossary in the back of the book to help w/unfamiliar words.
PainFrame More than 1 year ago
What are you thinking of, bhai?  I like epic stories, I like big books, I like the setting of Bombay, I even like the way Vikram Chandra writes, but I don’t like this book. I can’t help but feel that this story could have benefited from a more concise edit. There’s WAY too much stuff in here that doesn’t matter; scattered throughout the book are tangent chapters which only incidentally relate to the main characters or the story! If a meandering story with lots of flavor appeals to you, maybe you can enjoy it, but for me this story felt like too much work with little payoff. Never again.
babsbabsbabs More than 1 year ago
Worthy of Worship. An incredable epic novel. The effort you put into reading this very long novel is worth every minute. A real rodeo.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Just a great story. Great writing, great characters, plot, backstories, etc. Great descriptions of Mumbai and India, but they were never dull. The setting was as compelling a character as any of the characters themselves.
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Hill_Ravens More than 1 year ago
A journey into another land, where things are familiar on the surface but become darker and more perilous the further you wander. I knew nothing of the Indian culture going into the book and was pleasantly surprised by some of the cultural and historical (implied) situations and positions discussed in the book. The characters were developed a little slowly at first and once the book gets going, it was easy to pick out my favorites. At times it felt like there was too much detail in the writing, yet it all managed to come together in the end, and I don't think it would have without the extra details up front. I loved the side stories interjected throughout the main story and how they nicely tied into and related back to the overall adventure being pursued by the characters. It was refreshing and felt more honest to have all the threads of the journey weave together at the end without a bow or clichéd ending. I really enjoyed the various arenas the book explores: gangsters, families, religion, commerce, governments and their agencies, teachers, rebels, kids all wrapped together with the same goal in their hearts but a thousand different ways to obtain it. On one level Sacred Games is fine example of religion being twisted and used to manipulate and remove opposition. My only recommendation would be to use the glossary at the back of the book from the start. I never look at the back cause I don't want to ruin the ending.
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