Sadako and the thousand paper cranes

Overview

Hiroshima-born Sadako is lively and athletic—the star of her school's running team. And then the dizzy spells start. Soon gravely ill with leukemia, the "atom bomb disease," Sadako faces her future with spirit and bravery. Recalling a Japanese legend, Sadako sets to work folding paper cranes. For the legend holds that if a sick person folds one thousand cranes, the gods will grant her wish and make her healthy again. Based on a true story, Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes celebrates the extraordinary courage ...

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Overview

Hiroshima-born Sadako is lively and athletic—the star of her school's running team. And then the dizzy spells start. Soon gravely ill with leukemia, the "atom bomb disease," Sadako faces her future with spirit and bravery. Recalling a Japanese legend, Sadako sets to work folding paper cranes. For the legend holds that if a sick person folds one thousand cranes, the gods will grant her wish and make her healthy again. Based on a true story, Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes celebrates the extraordinary courage that made one young woman a heroine in Japan.

Hospitalized with the dreaded atom bomb disease, leukemia, a child in Hiroshima races against time to fold one thousand paper cranes to verify the legend that by doing so a sick person will become healthy.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698118027
  • Publisher: Penguin Young Readers Group
  • Publication date: 12/28/1999
  • Edition description: Reissue
  • Pages: 80
  • Sales rank: 38,531
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years
  • Product dimensions: 5.14 (w) x 7.75 (h) x 0.19 (d)

Table of Contents

Prologue 7
1 Good Luck Signs 9
2 Peace Day 15
3 Sadako's Secret 21
4 A Secret No Longer 28
5 The Golden Crane 33
6 Kenji 40
7 Hundreds of Wishes 48
8 Last Days 52
9 Racing With the Wind 60
Epilogue 64
About the Author and This Book 65
How to Fold a Paper Crane 69
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2008

    'One of the most emotional books we've read.

    Our third grade class just finished reading Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes. We really enjoyed the book because it taught us a lot about Japan's culture and some of its recent history. We learned how our country's decision to drop the bomb affected so many families in Hiroshima. The book taught us not to give up hope even when things get tough. We enjoyed using Sadako's stategy of folding origami cranes to help keep her spirits up. It was fun to compare our two cultures and to find out that although we seem different, we are really very much alike. We recommend this book to kids aged 8 and up because younger kids might have a hard time with the subjects of war and death. We hope that you will enjoy this book as much as we did!

    11 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 7, 2011

    Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

    Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes by Eleanor Coerr was a short, but inspirational book. Sadako was an 11 year old Japanese girl who lived during WW II and the Atomic Bomb era. Her story began when an atomic bomb landed in Hiroshima, which is where she lived. The radiation from the bomb caused her to develop leukemia. Throughout the book she is fighting for her life with the help of her family and friends. There was an old Japanese saying that if you made 1,000 paper cranes you would be granted a wish. Sadako began making paper cranes hoping for only one wish, her life. She succeeded in making 644 cranes and became too ill and weak to finish. Her friends and family completed this great task for her. My thoughts about this book were that it was very deep and intense at times. Both kids and adults can relate to the hope and sensitivity of an ill person. It will inspire many to never give up but always keep as positive an attitude as you can.

    9 out of 9 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 5, 2012

    I've always wanted a copy of this book for myself

    Happy to have the book on my shelf, available for friends and children

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  • Posted May 15, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    wow!(:

    This book is so amazing. I was touched by the story of how she got cancer, and what she went through while in the hospital. I give this book two thumbs up and 5 stars! I highly highly recomend it for children or adults. It is truly an amazing book.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 1, 2009

    Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

    Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes, is an excellent book for middle school children to read. It addresses the conflicts that children face when overcome by a disease such as leukemia. It also addresses the fear of dying and the uncertainty that lies ahead. In this book, hope, enables a little girl to think positively and face the obstacles ahead.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 3, 2008

    A reviewer

    Sadako and the Thousand Paper cranes is an awesome book! Sadako is very caring about her family. I know she's a happy child because she likes to run.It's a little sad at the end. When you finish the book you get to make a real paper crane.You should really read Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes! I give this book 5 stars because it taught me how important it is to HOPE when things are not so good.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2008

    Best Book ever

    Im in 6th grade and we read this because we were learning about the bombs that destroyed Japan an dI can truly say this is one of the best books. The concept of it is very sad and i did start to cry but it is definetely recommended to anyone of any age! Once you start reading it you cannot put it down!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 12, 2008

    A Great Book

    I recommend this book to second, third and fourth graders. It's at a reading level that these kids can read. It tells the story about a girl in Japan who got sick from radiation from the atom bomb. She tried to make a thousand paper cranes to bring her good luck. It is very touching.You will like it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2007

    Sadako and the thousand paper cranes

    The book I wrote my critical review on was titled Sadako and the Thousand paper Cranes. This book is a biography that was written by Eleanor Coerr. Due to the fact that this book takes place in the past and is a true life story, it is a good example of an historical non-fiction selection. Sadako Sasaki became a heroine to the children of Japan near the end of World War II. Sadako lived in Hiroshima, and when she was only two years old her native country of Japan was attacked by the Americans. The American Army attacked Japan with an atomic bomb. The impact and radiation form the atomic bomb killed as many as 140,000 people. Sadao was made sick by the radiation and developed leukemia. The book moves quickly through Sadako¿s life until she turns eleven years old. During this time Sadako became a runner. At one of Sadako¿s races she felt dizzy and passed out, this is how her leukemia was discovered. Sadako woke up in the hospital after this event and had nothing to do. Sadako decided to make origami paper cranes for the survivors of the atomic bomb. Sadako settled on making one thousand origami paper cranes because she believed that if she made one thousand she would be granted a special wish. In order to not spoil the ending of this story I cannot give many more details. Will Sadako live? Will Sadako finish the one thousand paper cranes? You will need to read this good book to find out. One of the strongest selling points of the book are the emotions felt while reading it. The circumstances in the book are often sad, it may be the saddest book I have ever read. The books weakest point is that it is very short, it is only sixty-four pages with pictures. It may have been more interesting if it were longer. I would recommend this book to people who like biographies and enjoy emotional reading. I am glad I chose this book and really enjoyed it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 2006

    '1,000 paper Cranes'

    This book is a 4 star book. I give it 4 stars because this book isn¿t as interesting as others I have read before. I would recommend this book, especially to the people who are studying about American History. Just because people weren¿t killed when the bombs hit, the radiation killed many people over the years. I kind of like this book because Sadako made this story want you to listen¿.it grabs your attention! Those 1000 paper cranes she wanted to make for her wish, which she couldn¿t finish making, her classmates finished them for her. I would recommend this book. This book also tells you want the results of the atomic bomb were.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2006

    a great book

    Sadako and the thousand paper cranes is a really nice book. This book is about a family from Japan that talks about an atomic bomb that happen years ago, and killed many peoples and one of them was Sadako¿s grandma. Sadako was teenager girl who was sick because of the atomic bomb.Sadako was at the hospital, her friend Shasuko went to visit her and gave Sadako a paper crane and told her to make a thousand and make a wish and when she had finished the thousand paper cranes she would feel better. Sadako was a friendly girl, at the hospital she had a friend name Kenji, he was 9 yrs. Old, Kenji died. Sadako made 644 paper cranes and those were the last ones she did. Latwr on she died, her classmates made the last paper cranes Sadako needed to make a thousand and they buried them with Sadako. This is a really nice book and sad too. I recommend this book to everyone because is an interesting book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2006

    ReAd tHiZ BoOk!!

    I really loved Sadako And The Thousand Paper Cranes because it was a really touchy story. This story is about a young girl that loved to run. But then one day all of a sudden she got sick, every time she will run she would get dizzy but she was too scared to tell her parents so she will let it go. So since then they told her she had leukemia know as the ¿atomic bomb¿ disease. So they told her if she did thousand paper cranes she would get a wish and her only wish was to get better so that she would run again. Read this book and you will find out did she finish all thousand paper cranes? Those she gets the wish? Read this book I know you would love it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 20, 2006

    Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes

    I think the book Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes was a really good book and interesting at the same time. Because it showed how the atomic bomb killed a lot of people and injure to. This book was mainly about this girl named Sadako that had gotten the disease the bomb gives you that is leukemia. She didn¿t know that she had the disease until she fainted and they had taken her to the hospital that was the hospital were most people had gone cause they had the disease. The doctors told Sadako parents that she had leukemia that¿s when she found out she had leukemia. And then a few days passed and her friend came to visit her and told her that if she made 1,000 paper cranes that she could get a wish. She tried making one thousand but she only made 500 and something because she was becoming too weak. Then she passed away. I recommend people to read this book because it really shows you that no matter if you¿re really sick you should never give up just because you know that you have that disease. Like Sadako she never gave up she still kept doing the paper cranes until she couldn¿t do it anymore. This book really showed me a lot. So I really recommend people to read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2006

    Still Remembering 10 years Later

    I first read this book in 3rd grade and now I'm a freshman in college and I can still remember this book. It is so powerful and moving and I'm sure I'll still remember it throughout my life.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 20, 2006

    Not realistic ?????

    One of the reviewers doesn¿t think this is a plausible story?? Well it really happened. There is a monument 4 her & everything. & maybe children should read this 2 get a different perspective of WWII

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 10, 2006

    WHY DO WE HAVE TO READ THIS IN SCHOOL!!!!!!

    This book tells about history yeah but also isnt very realistic the things that happen in this book would probably never actually happen in everyday life. Also i think Sadoko is very stuck up. IT wasnt really worth reading.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 28, 2006

    great book

    The first time I read this book was 4 gread and now I am 7 gread and still remember this book .I think this book was happy sad and I enjoyed it and I hope you do to.I relly like this book becuse they say some intresting things and it dosent make you bord.When ever I stop it will fill like you want to read more and you will be thinking in your head what will happen next.Well enjoy your book.......

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2006

    amazing read

    this was such an amazing book. Everything about it was so mesmerizing, and completely capturing, in an innocent way. It gives you a different perspective on life, death, war, and sickness.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 2, 2006

    Bes. Book. Ever!

    This book was really powerful and moving. I actually cried. I would reccomend this book to adults and children everywhere.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 13, 2005

    W0ahhhh . good book here =]

    this book has got to be the most life changing book. You really understand life better just from reading the book. You become passionate and its just unexpanable. I really love this book and read it at least twice a month.

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