Sadako

( 5 )

Overview

Japanese legend holds that if a person who is ill makes a thousand paper cranes, the gods will grant that person's wish to be well again. Hauntingly beautiful illustrations by Caldecott-medalist Ed Young enhance the story of Sadako, a young girl dying of leukemia as a result of the atom bombing of Hiroshima. The poignancy of Sadako's brave struggle will touch children of all ages in this revised version of Eleanor Coerr's classic novel.

Hospitalized with the dreaded ...

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Overview

Japanese legend holds that if a person who is ill makes a thousand paper cranes, the gods will grant that person's wish to be well again. Hauntingly beautiful illustrations by Caldecott-medalist Ed Young enhance the story of Sadako, a young girl dying of leukemia as a result of the atom bombing of Hiroshima. The poignancy of Sadako's brave struggle will touch children of all ages in this revised version of Eleanor Coerr's classic novel.

Hospitalized with the dreaded atom bomb disease, leukemia, a child in Hiroshima races against time to fold one thousand paper cranes to verify the legend that by doing so a sick person will become healthy.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
An abridgement of the novel Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes combined with images from a film adaptation of the work yields a complex and somewhat abstract picture book. Using a sampling of the illustrations he created for the movie version, Young ( Seven Blind Mice ) subtly accentuates the poignancy of the story without rendering it sentimental. His ethereal pastels (reminiscent of his art in The Red Thread ) seem to convey the mood, rather than the actual activity, of the text. Sweeping panoramas alternate with wispy image fragments against ample white space: a face half-concealed, a shadow darting past. Coerr's condensed text succeeds in retaining the simple lyricism of the original, allowing the leukemia-stricken Sadako to emerge as a quietly courageous girl. Given the necessary length of the text, the mature subject matter and the sophisticated artwork, this book may find its most welcoming audience among older readers, especially those who enjoyed its original version as a novel. Ages 5-9. (Oct.)
School Library Journal
Gr 2-6-This is the same story as the author's Sadako and the Thousand Paper Cranes (Putnam, 1977), told through an entirely new text. In this abbreviated version, the beautiful, limpid prose and crisp dialogue further telescope Sadako's fight with leukemia, ``the atom-bomb disease,'' adding greater impact to her death. What was an epilogue in the novel is here an integral, if anticlimactic, part of the text due to the exceptional flow of the illustrations. Young's pastels vividly capture all the moods of the narrative, place, and characters. The use of light, most obvious as Sadako lays dying, is particularly noteworthy, as is the crane motif as a recurring symbol of hope. A masterful collaboration that will attract many new friends for Sadako.-John Philbrook, San Francisco Public Library
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780698115880
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/28/1997
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 230,556
  • Age range: 5 - 11 Years
  • Lexile: AD500L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 8.00 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.18 (d)

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 5 )
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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2011

    A book about hope and peace.

    In Sadako, by Eleanor Coerr, nine year old Sadako Sasaki lives in Hiroshima, Japan in 1954. She is so excited one morning because she will get to go to Peace Park. This day was the memorial for the atomic bomb that dropped on the city in 1945.
    Sadako is a book about hope and peace. Sadako Sasaki was only a baby when the atomic bomb dropped on the city. Nine years later, she was running in the schoolyard, when she got dizzy and fell on the ground. When Sadako woke up, she was in a hospital on a bed with doctors surrounding her. Dr.Numata was tapping her back and asking a lot of guestions. Sadako had gotten leukemia from the atomic bomb! In the evening, her mom came to Sadako's room and told her everything will be ok. She told Sadako to fold one thousand paper cranes, then her wish will come true.
    Some people thought that dropping the atomic bomb would teach Japan a lesson and end World War II. When you read the book, you thought that Sadako would eventually survive the cancer and live a long life. But when the bomb dropped, in a split second, more than 100,000 people died. Soon, most of the people who survived the bomb will eventually die from the radiation.
    Now, people are feeling guilty in the U.S., especially the pilots who dropped the bomb. They took away lives of innocent people. This book probably changed their thinking.
    Eleanor Coerr wrote Sadako because she was sending a message to the reader that this book isn't just about the atomic bomb. This book is about friendship and peace. She also was trying to make people think differently toward the atomic bomb.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 3, 2011

    Best book in the whole world!!!!!!

    In Sadako,by Eeanor Coerr and Ed Young, Sadako has been stricken with Leukemia from the Thunderbolt bomb. Sadako takes a long journey through pain and grief. Then her classmates finish what she isn't able to.
    Sadako is a normal girl living a normal life. Sadako has just joined the relay team and won the first race. Aftre the race, Sadako felt a little dizzy from all of the running. She passed out and her family rushed her to the hospital. The doctor said she had Leukemia from the Thunderbolt bomb that hit Hiroshima in 1945 during World War II. Sadako knew she was going to die sooner or later, but her parents don't want to doubt her. She goes through a bunch of pain from radiation. Sadako and her friends decide to try to make her 1,000 paper cranes so she can live in peace. Sadako learns that when you exprience a bombing, you can get sick just like she did. She had to help her family rebuild her house. She was just a little baby when the bomb was dropped.
    The author wrote the book because it was a true story and to share a story of a child affected by the bomb.
    The author's purpose of this book was to describe what happened to the children of Hiroshima. He wanted to make you feel bad for the children who experienced the bomb.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 24, 2007

    sadako

    i like this book because it has alot of thinking in it and it makes thinking come into your mind once you read all of the storys by them and it lets you know that some but not all wishes can come true.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 7, 2006

    The most moving book ever

    I read this book when I was in third grade, now I am a junior and I went out and bought it because I was writing a paper on emotional stories. While reading it again it has moved be beyond expression and while this is a comprehendable book for grade school kids it should be read by people of all ages. It is simply that moving.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2000

    Sadako Is The Best Book I Ever Read

    This book that I read is called Sadako and The Thousands Cranes. It is the best book I ever read. It almost makes you feel like your there or you can feel what all the people are going through. If you hate reading like I do trust me you'll want to read this book. It's about this atom bomb that hits Hiroshima when Sadako was only 2. Sadako was the fastest and best runner on her relay team, then after she got finished running one day she started getting dizzy spells but she didn't tell anyone but herbest friend Chizuco. She didn't even find out that she had the atom bomb diaese until 9 years later.I'll let you read the rest and find out what happend but, you really should read this book it is so good we were reading in Lang.Arts then after we got done we went to go see the play that was really neat. So thats all I'm gonna tell you so make sure you read this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 2, 2010

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