Sailing Alone Around the World

( 329 )

Overview

"One of the most readable books in the whole library of adventure." — Sports Illustrated. Classic of sea adventure conveys all the excitement of being the first man to sail around the world, alone, in small boat. Pirates, perils, witty observations, stories. 67 illustrations. "A literary gem, adroitly and engagingly written." — National Fisherman.

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Sailing Alone Around the World (Barnes & Noble Classics Series)

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Overview

"One of the most readable books in the whole library of adventure." — Sports Illustrated. Classic of sea adventure conveys all the excitement of being the first man to sail around the world, alone, in small boat. Pirates, perils, witty observations, stories. 67 illustrations. "A literary gem, adroitly and engagingly written." — National Fisherman.

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Editorial Reviews

New York Times
...[F]ull of interest to lovers of adventures.
The New York Times
...[F]ull of interest to lovers of adventures.
— 1900
From the Publisher
"One of the most readable books in the whole library of adventure."— Sports Illustrated

"A classic book. . . . Slocum's writing is as elegant as his thirty-seven-foot sloop, Spray, whose crossing of the Atlantic he describes vividly."— The New Yorker

From Barnes & Noble
In 1895, Slocum set sail in his sloop, the Spray, on a voyage that was to take 3 years & earn him a place in history as the first man to navigate the globe singlehandedly. Here is Slocum's own story, told with the salt resilience of an old sailor. 4 1/2" x 6 3/4".
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780486203263
  • Publisher: Dover Publications
  • Publication date: 6/1/1956
  • Series: Century Seafarers Series
  • Edition description: Unabridged
  • Pages: 336
  • Product dimensions: 5.41 (w) x 8.03 (h) x 0.66 (d)

Meet the Author


Author and sailor Joshua Slocum (1804–1909[?]) was the first man to sail single-handedly around the world, an achievement he wrote about in his most famous book, Sailing Alone Around the World.

Alan Sklar is the winner of several AudioFile Earphones Awards and a multiple finalist for the APA's prestigious Audie Award. Named a Best Voice of 2009 by AudioFile magazine, his work has twice earned him a Booklist Editors' Choice Award, a Publishers Weekly Listen-Up Award, and Audiobook of the Year by ForeWord magazine.

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Read an Excerpt

Joshua Slocum, one of the most famous of American sea captains, really was the first to single-handedly circumnavigate the world. The epitome of Yankee independence, he had risen from a seaman to the captain of his own ship. Marooned in Brazil, he built a "canoe" in which he returned to America (see The Voyage of the Liberdade). At loose ends at fifty-one, he was offered an old oyster boat which he rebuilt into the 37' Spray and in 1895 he took off from Boston for the Straits of Gibraltar.

He is a captivating writer as well; observant, humorous, and evocative:

"For, one day, well off the Patagonian coast, while the sloop was reaching under short sail, a tremendous wave, the culmination, it seemed, of many waves, rolled down upon her in a storm, roaring as it came. I had only a moment to get all sail down and myself up on the peak halliards, out of danger, when I saw the mighty crest towering masthead-high above me. The mountain of water submerged my vessel. She shook in every timber and reeled under the weight of the sea, but rose quickly out of it, and rode grandly over the rollers that followed. It may have been a minute that from my hold in the rigging I could see no part of the Spray's hull. Perhaps it was even less time than that, but it seemed a long while, for under great excitement one lives fast, and in a few seconds one may think a great deal of one's past life."

He met determined pirates in Tierra del Fuego:

"I was not for letting on that I was alone, and so I stepped into the cabin, and, passing through the hold, came out at the fore-scuttle, changing my clothes as I went along. That made two men. Then the piece of bowsprit which I had sawed off at Buenos Aires, and which I had still on board, I arranged forward on the lookout, dressed as a seaman, attaching a line by which I could pull it into motion. That made three of us..."

In Africa he met the explorer Henry Stanley:

"Mr. Stanley was a nautical man once himself, - on the Nyanza, I think, - and of course my desire was to appear in the best light before a man of his experience. He looked me over carefully, and said,

'What an example of patience!'

'Patience is all that is required,' I ventured to reply.

He then asked if my vessel had water-tight compartments. I explained that she was all water-tight and all compartment.

'What if she should strike a rock?' he asked.

'Compartments would not save her if she should hit the rocks lying along her course,' said I; adding, 'she must be kept away from the rocks.'

After a considerable pause Mr. Stanley asked, 'What if a swordfish should pierce her hull with its sword?'

Of course I had thought of that as one of the dangers of the sea, and also of the chance of being struck by lightning. In the case of the swordfish, I ventured to say that 'the first thing would be to secure the sword.'

So this is where Jack London got the idea for watertight compartments! (see Cruise of the Snark, available from The Narrative Press) Discover for yourself why everyone reads this book (called a sailor's Walden) - even if you're not planning a solo sailing trip. And take it with you if you are!

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Table of Contents

CHAPTER I
A blue-nose ancestry with Yankee proclivities
Youthful fondness for the sea
Master of the ship Nothern Light
Loss of the Aquidneck
Return home from Brazil in the canoe Liberdade
"The gift of a "Ship"
The rebuilding of the Spray
Conundrums in regard to finance and calking
The launching of the Spray
CHAPTER II
Failure as a fisherman
A voyage around the world projected
From Boston to Gloucester
Fitting out for the Ocean voyage
Half of a dory for a ship's boat
The run from Gloucester to Nova Scotia
A shaking up in home waters
Amoung old friends
CHAPTER III
Good-by to the American coast
Off Sable Island in a fog
In the open sea
The man in the moon takes an interest in the voyage
The first fit of loneliness
The Spray encounters La Vaguisa
A bottle of wine from the Spaniard
A bout of words with the captain of the Java
The steamship Olympia spoken
Arrival at the Azores
CHAPTER IV
Squally weather in the Azores
High living
Delirious from cheese and plums
The pilot of the Pinta
At Gibraltar
Compliments exchanged with the British navy
A picnic on the Morocco shore
CHAPTER V
Sailing from Gibraltar with the assistance of her Majesty's tug
The Spray's course changed from the Suez Canal to Cape Horn
Chased by a Moorish pirate
A Comparison with Columbus
The Canary Islands
The Cape Verde Islands
Sea life
Arrival at Pernambuco
A bill against the Brazilian Government
Preparing for the stormy weather of the cape
CHAPTER VI
Departure from Rio de Janeiro
The Spray ashore on the sands of Uruguay
A narrow escape from shipwreck
The boy who found a sloop
The Spray floated but somewhat damaged
Courtesies from the British consul at Maldonado
A warm greeting at Montevideo
An excursion to Buenos Aires
Shortening the Mast and bowsprit
CHAPTER VII
Weighing anchor at Buenos Aires
An outburst of emotion at the mouth of the Plate
Submerged by a great wave
A stormy entrance to the strait
Captain Samblich's happy gift of a bag of carpet-tacks
Off Cape Froward
Chased by Indians from Fortescue Bay
"A miss-shot for "Black Pedro"
Taking in supplies of wood and water at Three Island Cove
Animal life
CHAPTER VIII
From Cape Pillar to the Pacific
Driven by a tempest toward Cape Horn
Captain Slocum's greatest sea adventure
Reaching the strait again by way of Cockburn Channel
Some savages find the carpet-tacks
Danger from firebrands
A series of fierce williwaws
Again sailing westward
CHAPTER IX
Repairing the Spray's sails
Savages and an obstreperous anchor
A spider flight
An encounter with Black Pedro
A visit to the steamship Colombia
On the defensive against a fleet of canoes
A record of voyages through the strait
A chance cargo of tallow
CHAPTER X
Running to Port Angosto in a snow-storm
A defective sheet-rope places the Spray in peril
The Spray as a target for a Fuegian arrow
The island of Alan Erric
Again in the open Pacific
The run to the island of Juan Fernandez
An absentee king
At Robinson Crusoe's achorage
CHAPTER XI
The islanders of Juan Fernandez entertained with Yankee doughnuts
The beauties of Robinson Crusoe's realm
The mountain monument to Alexander Selkirk
Robinson Crusoe's cave
A stroll with the children of the island
Westward ho! with a friendly gale
A month's free sailing with the Southern Cross and the sun for guides
Sighting the Marquesas
Experience in reckoning
CHAPTER XII
Seventy-two days without a port
Whales and birds
A peep into the Spray's galley
Flying-fish for breakfast
A welcome at Apia
A visit from Mrs. Robert Louis Stevenson
At Vailma
Samoan hospitality
Arrested for fast riding
An amusing merry-go-round
Teachers and pupils of Papauta College
At the mercy of sea-nymphs
CHAPTER XIII
Samoan royalty
King Malietoa
Good-by to friends at Vailima
Leaving Fiji to the south
"Arrival at Newcastle, Australia"
The yachts of Sydney
A ducking on the Spray
Commodore Foy presents the sloop with a new suit of sails
On to Melbourne
A shark that proved to be valuable
A change of course
"The "Rain of Blood"
In Tasmania
CHAPTER XIV
A testimonial from a lady
Cruising round Tasmania
The skipper delivers his first lecture on the voyage
Abundant provisions
An inspection of the Spray for safety at Devonport
Again at sydney
Northward bound for Torres Strait
An amateur shipwreck
Friends on the Australian coast
Perils of a coral sea
CHAPTER XV
"Arrival at Port Denison, Queensland"
A lecture
Reminiscences of Captain Cook
Lecturing for charity at Cooktown
A happy escape from a coral reef
"Home Island, Sunday Island, Bird Island"
An American pearl-fisherman
Jubilee at Thursday Island
A new ensign for the Spray
Booby Island
Across the Indian Ocean
Christmas Island
CHAPTER XVI
A call for careful navigation
Three hours' steering in twenty-three days
Arrival at the Kelling Cocos Islands
A curious chapter of social history
A welcome from the children of the islands
Cleaning and painting the Spray on the beach
A Mohammedan blessing for a pot of jam
Keeling as a paradise
A risky adventure in a small boat
Away to Rodiguez
Taken for Antichrist
The govener calms the fears of the people
A lecture
A convent in the hills
CHAPTER XVII
A clean bill of health at Mauritus
Sailing the voyage over again in the opera-house
A newly discovered plant named in honor of the Spray's skipper
A party of young ladies out for a sail
A bivouac on deck
A warm reception at Durban
A friendly cross-examination by Henry M. Stanley
Three wise Boers seek proof of the flatness of the earth
Leaving South Africa
CHAPTER XVIII
"Rounding the "Cape of Storms" in olden time"
A rough Christmas
The Spray ties up for three months' rest at Cape Town
A railway trip to the Transvaal
President Kruger's odd definition of the Spray's voyage
His terse sayings
Distinguished guests on the Spray
Cocoanut fiber as a padlock
Courtesies from the admiral of the Queen's navy
Off for St. Helena
Land in sight
CHAPTER XIX
In the isle of Napoleon's exile
Two lectures
A guest in the ghost-room at Plantation House
An excursion to historic Longwood
"Coffee in the husk, and a goat to shell it"
The Spray's ill luck with animals
A prejudice against small dogs
"A rat, the Boston spider, and the cannibal cricket"
Ascension Island
CHAPTER XX
"In the favoring current off Cape St. Roque,Brazil"
All at sea regarding the Spanish-American war
The light on Trinidad
A charming introduction to Grenada
Talks to friendly auditors
CHAPTER XXI
Clearing for home
In the calm belt
A sea covered with sargasso
The jibstay parts in a gale
Welcomed by a tornado off Fire Island
A change of plan
Arrival at Newport
End of a cruise of over forty-six thousand miles
The Spray again at Fairhaven
APPENDIX
"LINES AND SAIL-PLAN OF THE "SPRAY"
Her pedigree so far as known
The lines of the Spray
Her self-steering qualities
Sail-plan and steering-gear
An unprecedented feat
A final word of cheer to would-be navigators
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 329 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(165)

4 Star

(60)

3 Star

(45)

2 Star

(27)

1 Star

(32)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 333 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2010

    Sailing along side the Spray

    I stumbled across Sailing Alone Aound the World by chance. Slocum draws you into his world as he travels from port to port and battles gales and the deadly Southern Ocean. Throughout the novel we learn what it really means to travel solo and find interpeace.

    8 out of 8 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2007

    What we all what to know.

    Being a Yankee Skipper, Capt. Slocum could probably relish his book¿s ability to still sell after one hundred and nine years. But the question on the reader¿s mind is still the one that annoyed him occasionally at ports of call on his voyage: ¿Where¿s the profit¿?¿ ¿What¿s the sense of trying to sail around the world alone, Captain?¿ or ¿Why read?¿ Captain Slocum may well have answered that, in his case, sailing beyond his geographical horizon took him beyond his psychological horizon. Not once, but so many times, that he found his place among men and intuitively his place in the universe. His is an account of a man discovering and being exactly where he¿s meant to be. What about us readers? Maybe we need the encouragement to find out, or, even, ask the question? Barnes & Noble combined a background and introduction that compliments the story well, so, read closely. If the story starts to read you continuing may lead to unsettling thoughts, feelings and questions. Careful, you know what Nazis did with that sort of book?

    6 out of 11 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted June 16, 2011

    Beautifully Written

    I bought this on a whim while I was looking through the B&N Classics section. Joshua Slocum writes so honestly and eloquently. Thoroughly enjoyable, this work will take you around the world and show you the indomitable spirit of an honest sailor.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted October 10, 2011

    Tall Adventure

    It's not Treasure Island but it is an epic true story of a man who sailed the earth alone. Knowing the story is true and the recurring dangers that Slocum faced will pull you through this great book. As for the format, it's easy to read and the occasional the sketches of scenes from the book are a pleasure to behold.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2013

    Great story

    Loved the adventures and tribulations. Great true story. Very memorable. Great writing.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 20, 2011

    Couldn't udersrand plot

    Lots of typos i diliked it.

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2013

    typos

    Too many scanning errors to be readable.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 11, 2013

    A great writer! In my humble opinion Slokum should be considered to be among the greats, If you sail you must read this book, Slokum paints an incredible tale of a sailor who rebuilr an old broken down wooden sailboat, to sail around the world

    Considered with the greats Beariful prose tells of a sailor who restores an old dilapidared sailboat and sails it around the world single handed The Spray sails herself and overtakes ships with full crews An amazing boat Imagine pressing past Cape Horn only to find pirates on the other side If you sail you must read this captain's log i've never written a review before this, but I must encourage all who love great writing, great story telling, and a great story to honor this man bv reading his tale

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2012

    Follow with goggle map

    Found it to be a good book
    I followed Slocum's travels on Goggle Map which made it more interesting. I really liked the fact the book was free

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 11, 2011

    Bad Scan

    Bad Scan

    Like so many of the free books available for the Nook, this scan is very poor. Pagination and printing is off. It may be a good book, but the edition fails as an ebook.

    It is not worth the trouble, and I am deleting it.

    I guess you really do get what you pay for¿

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted February 15, 2011

    Why this edition?

    I give this a 1 star, as this is a book that is in the public domain, I don't know why an "editor" would be needed as it has been edited and published before. This is a fine book and does not need editing. Again this is a book in the public domain, so just read the free version.

    Again this book is a 5 star, but this edition is a 1 star as it adds too much cost to the free work.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 15, 2011

    Annoying Scan

    This scan made it difficult to read. Story was ok. Lacking in description, especially while at sea.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 12, 2011

    crummy copy

    This version was a mess, almost unreadable . I have to find a better copy.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 19, 1999

    An excellent adventure that will captivate you

    Slocum is a fabulous writer and his story will amaze you as you imagine his journey in a handmade boat over 100 years ago. I loved reading this and will no doubt read it many times in the years to come. A true classic.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted March 6, 2014

    Xylie

    Umm hello

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2014

    Joel to qeqs

    I so your qosts and want to qost u giys qost back

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2014

    Magik

    "Love you too." ((Bye))

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 13, 2014

    Ace

    "No......"

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 7, 2014

    Ace *

    Her *

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2014

    Hooded figure

    *Leaves.*

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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