Saint Glinglin

Saint Glinglin

by Raymond Queneau
     
 

Saint Glinglinis a tragicomic masterpiece, a novel that critic Vivian Mercier said "can be mentioned without incongruity in the company" of Mann'sMagic Mountainand Joyce's Ulysses. "By turns strange, beautiful, ludicrous, and intellectually stimulating" (as Mercier goes on to say),Saint Glinglinretells the primal Freudian myth of sons

See more details below

Overview

Saint Glinglinis a tragicomic masterpiece, a novel that critic Vivian Mercier said "can be mentioned without incongruity in the company" of Mann'sMagic Mountainand Joyce's Ulysses. "By turns strange, beautiful, ludicrous, and intellectually stimulating" (as Mercier goes on to say),Saint Glinglinretells the primal Freudian myth of sons killing the father in an array of styles ranging from direct narrative, soliloquy, and interior monologue to quasi-biblical verse.

In this strange tale of a land where it never rains, where a bizarre festival is held every Saint Glinglin's Day, Queneau deploys fractured syntax, hidden structures, self-imposed constraints, playful allusions, and puns and neologisms to explore the most basic concepts of culture. In the process, Queneau satirizes anthropology, folklore, philosophy, and epistemology, all the while spinning a story as appealing as a fairy tale.

Dalkey Archive Press

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Queneau's funny, philosophical nonsense is addictive." -- PW

Dalkey Archive Press

"Queneau's riveting language provides an entree to complex existentialist meditations on the alienation of both fish and humans from nature and to brilliantly inventive discourses on insects. The plot is fantastical but interwoven with enough threads of reality to keep the reader turning pages. A fine rendition of one of Queneau's most important novels; essential for academic and large public libraries." -- Library Journal

Dalkey Archive Press

Los Angeles Times
A fable whose extravagant plot is told with Queneau's odd-matter-of-factness, and whose exhilaration comes in the small upsets. . . . A beguiling wackiness laced with mysteries . . . St. Experys Little Prince could be recounting Finnegans Wake.
Richard Eder, Los Angeles Times, 7/1/93
Washington Post
He is one of those writers, like his antic compeers G. K. Chesterton, Flann O'Brien and Lewis Carroll, who inspire newsletters, fan clubs, passionate exegeses and scholarly conferences. . . . An amalgam of the anthropological and the archetypal, leavened with sex, slapstick, wordplay and philosophical investigations. . . . This novel will certainly repay readerly efforts . . . but none is required to enjoy its bizarre humor.
Michael Dirda, Washington Post, 7/22/93
Austin Chronicle
Consider what you get here: references to and satires of mythology and Freudian psychology. Varied narrative styles, including soliloquy, interior monologue, verse, and third person. A lot of laughs. Discussions of serious philosophical issues which are thought-provoking even when hilarious. All in one slim volume.
Harvey Pekar, Austin Chronicle, 9/24/93
New Yorker
Like all his fiction, it is so blissfully fizzy that the reader may scarcely notice its complexity.
New Yorker, 7/2/93
Boston Phoenix
Raymond Queneau, that most erudite and light-hearted of experimental writers, plays his narrative games with vaudevillian humor as well as nihilistic abandon. . . . Queneau's vision in the wondrous Saint Glinglin, as in most of his fiction, is surrealism gone sane.
Bill Marx, Boston Phoenix, 7/93

Read More

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781564782304
Publisher:
Dalkey Archive Press
Publication date:
02/01/2000
Pages:
1
Sales rank:
1,493,286
Product dimensions:
5.58(w) x 8.50(h) x 0.56(d)

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >