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Saints & Sinners: The American Catholic Experience through Stories, Memoirs, Essays, and Commentary
     

Saints & Sinners: The American Catholic Experience through Stories, Memoirs, Essays, and Commentary

by Greg Tobin (Editor)
 

Saints and Sinners contains a rich variety of material whose diverse approaches capture the essence and texture of Catholicism since World War ll. There are essays of social commentary and theological discourse; dramatic fiction about characters in deep spiritual conflict or immersed in the joy of life; memoirs of ethnic heritage and of comic clashes of

Overview

Saints and Sinners contains a rich variety of material whose diverse approaches capture the essence and texture of Catholicism since World War ll. There are essays of social commentary and theological discourse; dramatic fiction about characters in deep spiritual conflict or immersed in the joy of life; memoirs of ethnic heritage and of comic clashes of cultures and ideas. This wide-ranging collection comes at a time when public interest in religious affairs - particularly relating to the Catholic Church, its teachings, its leadership, and the views of the laity - has never been more intense.

Saints and Sinners presents many classic pieces featuring some of the most renowned writers in the United States.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Operating from his conviction that American Catholic writers share a niche in American literature similar to Southern or New England writers, Tobin, former editor-in-chief of the Book-of-the-Month Club (now editor-in-chief of Ballantine), has compiled a "tasting menu" of 33 excerpts from books published since World War II. The book is divided into four sections: Politics and Protest, Witness and Dissent, Catholic Memories, Catholic Imagination. Because Tobin heavily emphasizes memoir and fiction, with smatterings of biography and sociology, the collection is a broad sample of American Catholic culture of the recent past. In and around the antilabor war of Cardinal Francis Spellman, the political trials of former New York Gov. Mario Cuomo and the tortured youthful conscience of writer Doris Kearns Goodwin, readers will encounter a range of perceptions, personalities and paradoxes. The "Catholic Memories" section includes notable reminiscences by luminaries such as Mary McCarthy, William F. Buckley and Garry Wills. Yet Tobin's anthology misses much of the turmoil of late 20th-century Catholicism. There is little more than a whiff here of Vatican II's reforms in liturgy and theology or of contemporary intra-Church battles over women's ordination, married priests and sexual ethics. Some may regret, too, the absence of poetry and the dominance of male views. Nevertheless, in addition to providing a good read, Tobin makes a significant contribution to a small but growing body of work on Catholicism as a category of American culture. (Oct.) Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780385493314
Publisher:
Random House, Incorporated
Publication date:
11/02/1999
Edition description:
1 ED
Pages:
367
Product dimensions:
6.56(w) x 9.57(h) x 1.18(d)

Read an Excerpt

In this remarkable tale Nick Barratt delves into the shadows of the British and Soviet secret services to reveal the shocking story of his great uncle Ernest Holloway Oldham. After serving in the British army during the First World War, Oldham was drafted into the British Foreign Office. Over the course of the next decade Ernest was drawn ever deeper into the underworld of pre-Cold War espionage, towards a double-life that became the darkest of secrets. Enigmatic and gripping this is a journey through post-First World War Europe where agents, special agents and double agents lurked in the darkness, during a period of history when everyone had something to hide.

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