Saladin and the fall of the Kingdom of Jerusalem

Saladin and the fall of the Kingdom of Jerusalem

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by Stanley Lane-Poole
     
 

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The first English biography ever written about Saladin, this thoroughly researched biography by a reputable scholar retains its readability and interest for those interested in this major Islamic leader of the twelfth century.See more details below

Overview

The first English biography ever written about Saladin, this thoroughly researched biography by a reputable scholar retains its readability and interest for those interested in this major Islamic leader of the twelfth century.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940022752854
Publisher:
New York ; London : G.P. Putnam''s Sons
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
1 MB

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THE LIFE OF SALADIN. CHAPTER I. Saladin's World. IN the year 1132 a broken army, flying before its pursuers, reached the left bank of the Tigris. On the other side, upon a steep cliff, stood the impregnable Fortress of Tekrit, defended landwards by a deep moat and accessible only by secret steps cut in the rock and leading from the heart of the citadel to the water's edge. The one hope of the fugitives was to attain the refuge of the castle, and their fate turned upon the disposition of its warden. Happily he chose the friendly part, and provided a ferry by which they crossed to safety. The ferry boats of the Tigris made the fortunes of the house of Saladin. The flying leader who owed his life to their timely succour was Zengy, the powerful lord of Mosil; and in later days, when triumph returned to his standards, he did not forget the debt he owed Tekrit, but, ever mindful of past services, carried itswarden onward and upward on the wave of his progress. This warden was Saladin's father. Ayyub (in English plain Job), surnamed after the fashion of the Saracens Nejm-ed-din, or " Star of the Faith," the fortunate commandant at this critical moment, although an oriental and a Mohammedan, belonged to the same great Aryan stock as ourselves, being neither Arab nor Turk, but a Kurd of the Rawadiya clan, born at their village of Ajda- nakan near Dawin in Armenia. From time immemorial the Kurds have led the same wild pastoral life in the mountain tracts between Persia and Asia Minor. In their clannishness, their love of thieving, their fine chivalrous sense of honour and hospitality, and their unquestioned courage, they resembled the Arabs of the " Days of Ignorance " before Islam, or theHighland Scots before the reforms of Marshal Wade. They have ever been a gallant and warlike...

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