Sally and the Some-Thing

Sally and the Some-Thing

5.0 1
by George O'Connor
     
 

Stuck at home with her mom and her new sibling, Sally heads for the swamp with her fishing pole and bike. What she discovers, in the form of a slimy, slithery Some-Thing, is a new best friend. Mud pies, burping contests, snail racing--and sensational, eerily beautiful artwork deliver plenty of kid appeal.

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Overview

Stuck at home with her mom and her new sibling, Sally heads for the swamp with her fishing pole and bike. What she discovers, in the form of a slimy, slithery Some-Thing, is a new best friend. Mud pies, burping contests, snail racing--and sensational, eerily beautiful artwork deliver plenty of kid appeal.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
"Humorous illustrations and deadpan commentary ... Children will likely request repeated readings of this delightful romp."

Publishers Weekly

 

"The illustrations ... feature plenty of quirky details to extend the story and entertain readers. In Sally’s words: 'not boring!'"

Kirkus Reviews

 

"The snappy text and comic pacing make this an ideal read-aloud."

School Library Journal

 

"A good choice for preschool story hours or for one-on-one sharing."

Booklist

Publishers Weekly
O'Connor (Kapow!) introduces overall-wearing Sally with a vivid imagination, who bikes off from her boring house with fishing rod in tow, determined "to catch something." A full-bleed spread, in hues of swampy green, shows the winding path Sally takes from her little wooden house to the pond, "past the big mud puddle... past the spooky old tree... past Mr. Tilly and his crazy dog" and conveys Sally's sense of the world as her playground. Her bright red pigtails contrast with gnarled moss-green trees and eerily still pond water, underscoring her self-confident spirit. When a bulgy-eyed swamp creature "sli-i-i- ithered... slu-u-u-urped... sle-e-e-ermed its way up onto the dock," Sally responds, "Coool!" Humorous illustrations and deadpan commentary capture the challenges the new friends encounter ("The tea party was a disaster. And the less said about the bicycle, the better"). The terrified Some-Thing rides out of control before catapulting off the bike, which lands in a tree. Some-Thing's game suggestions prove equally unsuccessful (e.g., snail races), thus prompting the two to create mutually satisfying activities. A highlight depicts Sally taking an exhilarating ride through the treetops on Some-Thing's back. Children will likely request repeated readings of this delightful romp. Ages 4-8. (Apr.) Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
Bored and lonely, Sally sets off for the pond with her fishing gear. Waiting there she feels as if she is being watched. When the Some-Thing emerges he slithers and slurps and looks pretty yucky, but Sally thinks he's cool and takes him off to play. The Some-Thing isn't very good at playing her games, and she is not entranced with his ideas either. So they make up some new games together: a burping contest and making edible mud pies. Sally finally takes the tired Some-Thing home to his father. Content, Sally is pleased to tell her mother that her new friend is "really something." The humor comes from the encounter between the theoretically fragile young girl and the superficially frightening monster who is basically just a kid. The dialog between them is particularly funny. Black outlines and natural colors create a most appealing, although cartoony, Sally and a woodsy arena. The Some-Thing is like an overgrown frog with long arms, a rather shapeless face, and a mouth full of teeth. The surrounding details and exaggerated actions depict a different kind of friendship for the plucky girl with, what may be, a great imagination. 2006, Roaring Brook Press/Holtzbrinck Publishing, Ages 4 to 8.
—Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 3-When Sally, armed with her fishing pole, goes to the pond, she isn't expecting a big, green, slurpy, slithery Some-Thing several times her size to crawl out of the murky water. She takes it all in stride, however ("`COOOL!' said Sally"), feeling confident that whatever this thing is, it will not be boring. At first the two have a difficult time finding a game to play together: "-the Some-Thing wasn't very good with crayons. The tea party was a disaster. And the less said about the bicycle, the better." Sally didn't particularly enjoy her new friend's favorite things, either. Finally, the two manage to invent a few new activities that they both can enjoy, and they have a terrific afternoon together. Bright, clever cartoon illustrations charged with an amusingly dramatic atmosphere set the stage perfectly for the dry humor of the text. Occasionally the words get lost in the bold illustrations, making reading aloud a little difficult, but the fun story is more than worth the effort. The snappy text and comic pacing make this an ideal read-aloud for generating laughs from the preschool set as well as elementary-aged kids. This friendship story is a treat for any library.-Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA Copyright 2006 Reed Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
After mining the world of comics for his previous titles, O'Connor seems to have turned to old horror films for his latest inspiration. Granted, the Some-Thing doesn't look exactly like the Creature from the Black Lagoon, but his fins and webbed feet evoke that particular monster, as does his upright stance. Sally, a red-haired moppet in overalls, is thrilled with the Some-Thing. She's bored with her mom and younger sibling and the Some-Thing is decidedly "not boring!" Although their first efforts to play don't work out, they eventually discover some mutually entertaining activities-a burping contest, for instance. O'Connor's understated text creates a kind of deadpan humor combined with his colorful single- and double-page illustrations. Executed in what appears to be pen and ink and watercolor, the pictures have a charming cartoon feel. The woodsy setting with a small cozy cabin and lily-pad strewn pond provide a comforting counterpoint to the hilariously ominous appearance of the Some-Thing. The illustrations also feature plenty of quirky details to extend the story and entertain readers. In Sally's words: "not boring!" (Picture book. 6-8)

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781596431416
Publisher:
Roaring Brook Press
Publication date:
04/04/2006
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.30(w) x 10.23(h) x 0.36(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

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