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Salsas of the World
     

Salsas of the World

by Mark Miller, Robert Quintana, Roberto Quintana (With)
 

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Mark Miller and Robert Quintana explore the authentic salsas of the world. Though traditionally associated with Mexico, salsas enhance dishes of many different cuisines. This book explores salsas from more than a dozen countries including Mexico, the United States, Italy, France, Thailand, China, Korea, Peru, and more. The recipes range from fresh and easy to hot

Overview

Mark Miller and Robert Quintana explore the authentic salsas of the world. Though traditionally associated with Mexico, salsas enhance dishes of many different cuisines. This book explores salsas from more than a dozen countries including Mexico, the United States, Italy, France, Thailand, China, Korea, Peru, and more. The recipes range from fresh and easy to hot and sour to smoky and satisfying; they include both the simple and complex, and the mild to red hot. Features more than 100 recipes and 50 beautiful color photographs.

Editorial Reviews

Serge The Concierge

Japan finds inspiration outside its borders and we find inspiration in things Japanese.

A case in point is Mountain Yam Shitake recipe from Salsas of the World (Gibbs Smith, October 2011) by Mark Miller with Robert Quintana.

I previously shared its Muhammara Recipe from Syria...

Mountain Yam Shitake / Japan

Delectable sweet potatoes are grown throughout Japan, and you see them especially in the fall during the street food festivals and temple celebrations, where sometimes there are more than 300 different food vendors in Kyoto. Even into late spring, during the cherry blossom festival viewing, there are trucks that come in from the countryside selling wonderful sweet roasted yams that are cooked in special wood and charcoal ovens fitted onto the backs of the trucks. Another famous street yam preparation is to cut them in thick wedges, making sweet potato fries that are then dusted with sugar and seven spice or Shichimi. The shitake mushrooms in this recipe are dark and earthy—woody against the sweet orange color of the yams—and the sansho or Japanese pepper gives it a mild peppery flavor. Be careful of the sesame oil that you use fresh sesame oil. Use just enough to suggest some richness, but do not overpower the mushroom and yams.

2 cups diced sweet potato

1 tablespoon canola oil

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon sansho chile powder

1/2 teaspoon Shichimi (Seven Spice Powder)

1 teaspoon sesame oil

4 cups diced shitake mushrooms

1 clove garlic, sliced

2 tablespoons canola oil

4 teaspoons organic soy sauce

1 tablespoon mirin

2 tablespoons water

1 tablespoon lime juice

1/2 teaspoon ground dashi

1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Peel and cube the sweet potato in 1/4-inch pieces. Place in a mixing bowl. Add the canola oil, salt, sansho chile powder, Shichimi, and sesame oil. Spread out in a single layer on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper. Use a spatula to get all the spices out of the bowl. Bake for 25 minutes. Let cool.

Prepare the shitakes by removing the woody stems and cubing mushrooms in 1/4-inch dice; reserve. In a nonstick sauté pan, place the garlic and oil and slowly start to cook the garlic over medium-low heat. When the garlic has browned, add the shitakes and cook for 4 minutes over medium heat. Add the soy, mirin, and water. Cook until the liquid has evaporated; remove from heat and cool. When cool add the limejuice. Mix in the baked sweet potatoes, dashi, and sesame seeds.

Yield 2 cups.

Serves 6

Heat level: 1 2 3 4

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781423622086
Publisher:
Smith, Gibbs Publisher
Publication date:
10/01/2011
Pages:
192
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.70(h) x 0.70(d)
Age Range:
16 Years

Read an Excerpt

Ranchero Salsa / Mexico

This is the tricolored salsa that you see on most Mexican breakfasts, on top of Sunny Side Up eggs with refried beans on the side and some warm, fresh corn tortillas. You can add more or less of your favorite chiles, and you can use vegetable oil if you like, although the recipe is named after a ranch where they have lots of hearty cooked foods. Do not let the salsa cook too long as you want to keep the individual items layered in texture and flavor. Most ranchero salsas have been sitting on the stove for hours and taste nothing like the simple, fresh version it should be. To make it easier in the morning to assemble breakfast, I usually fry the chiles a day ahead and have them peeled, but individually stored. The reason I use frying in this recipe is that the fire-roasted method is too smoky for eggs and not fresh enough. The fire-roasted tomatoes provide enough smoky, earthy notes. Ranchero Salsa is also good on fried chicken breasts, pork chops, or grilled fish.

1 cup canola oil

2 poblano chiles

4 serrano chiles

3 Fresno chiles

1 1/ 2 cups fire roasted and pureed Early Girl tomatoes

1/ 2 onion, sliced in strips

1 clove garlic, crushed

2 tablespoons lard or duck fat

1 teaspoon salt

1/ 2 bunch cilantro, wrapped in cheesecloth and tied

1 1/ 2 cups V8 Spicy Hot tomato juice

Heat the canola oil to 350 degrees F and fry the poblanos, serranos, and Fresnos in a skillet for 2 minutes to blister the skins. When cool enough to handle, peel, deseed, and cut in 1. 8- x 1 1/ 2-inch strips; reserve. Fire roast the tomatoes and puree in a food processor; reserve 1 1/2 cups. Saute the onion and garlic in lard or duck fat, being careful not to brown.

Add the salt, wrapped cilantro, V8 juice, tomato puree, poblanos, and serranos and cook for 10 minutes. Remove the cilantro. When cool, add the Fresnos. Yield 3 cups.

Serves 6

Heat level: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

What People are Saying About This

Serge The Concierge
Japan finds inspiration outside its borders and we find inspiration in things Japanese.

A case in point is Mountain Yam Shitake recipe from Salsas of the World (Gibbs Smith, October 2011) by Mark Miller with Robert Quintana.

I previously shared its Muhammara Recipe from Syria...

Mountain Yam Shitake / Japan

Delectable sweet potatoes are grown throughout Japan, and you see them especially in the fall during the street food festivals and temple celebrations, where sometimes there are more than 300 different food vendors in Kyoto. Even into late spring, during the cherry blossom festival viewing, there are trucks that come in from the countryside selling wonderful sweet roasted yams that are cooked in special wood and charcoal ovens fitted onto the backs of the trucks. Another famous street yam preparation is to cut them in thick wedges, making sweet potato fries that are then dusted with sugar and seven spice or Shichimi. The shitake mushrooms in this recipe are dark and earthy-woody against the sweet orange color of the yams-and the sansho or Japanese pepper gives it a mild peppery flavor. Be careful of the sesame oil that you use fresh sesame oil. Use just enough to suggest some richness, but do not overpower the mushroom and yams.

2 cups diced sweet potato

1 tablespoon canola oil

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon sansho chile powder

1/2 teaspoon Shichimi (Seven Spice Powder)

1 teaspoon sesame oil

4 cups diced shitake mushrooms

1 clove garlic, sliced

2 tablespoons canola oil

4 teaspoons organic soy sauce

1 tablespoon mirin

2 tablespoons water

1 tablespoon lime juice

1/2 teaspoon ground dashi

1 tablespoon sesame seeds, toasted

Preheat oven to 375 degrees F. Peel and cube the sweet potato in 1/4-inch pieces. Place in a mixing bowl. Add the canola oil, salt, sansho chile powder, Shichimi, and sesame oil. Spread out in a single layer on a sheet pan lined with parchment paper. Use a spatula to get all the spices out of the bowl. Bake for 25 minutes. Let cool.

Prepare the shitakes by removing the woody stems and cubing mushrooms in 1/4-inch dice; reserve. In a nonstick sauté pan, place the garlic and oil and slowly start to cook the garlic over medium-low heat. When the garlic has browned, add the shitakes and cook for 4 minutes over medium heat. Add the soy, mirin, and water. Cook until the liquid has evaporated; remove from heat and cool. When cool add the limejuice. Mix in the baked sweet potatoes, dashi, and sesame seeds.

Yield 2 cups.

Serves 6

Heat level: 1 2 3 4

Meet the Author

Mark Miller is the acclaimed chef-founder of Coyote Café in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and the author of nine books with nearly 1 million copies in print, including The Great Chile Book, The Great Salsa Book, and Tacos. He lives in Santa Fe. Robert Quintana is a food consultant. He lives in Los Angeles.

ROBERT QUINTANA graduated from the California Culinary Academy in San Francisco. He has worked with Paul Bocuse in Lyon, France, and has owned and operated bakeries in California. Robert is currently a food consultant, teacher, and caterer. He lives in Santa Fe.

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