Salsas that Cook: Using Classic Salsas to Enliven Our Favorite Dishes

Overview

FROM AMERICA'S LEADING AUTHORITY ON DEFINITIVE MEXICAN COOKING COMES A BRAND-NEW COLLECTION OF RECIPES BASED ON SIX CLASSIC, VERSATILE SALSAS, EACH FEATURING THE FLAVOR OF A DIFFERENT CHILE.
Salsas That Cook is a breakthrough in contemporary American cooking. Here, Mexico's classic salsas get put to work in our kitchens in the same way we use a variety of international condiments, from teriyaki sauce to balsamic vinegar, to enliven and redefine the flavor of many American ...

See more details below
Paperback (Original)
$12.93
BN.com price
(Save 31%)$19.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (45) from $2.76   
  • New (10) from $7.81   
  • Used (35) from $2.76   
Sending request ...

Overview

FROM AMERICA'S LEADING AUTHORITY ON DEFINITIVE MEXICAN COOKING COMES A BRAND-NEW COLLECTION OF RECIPES BASED ON SIX CLASSIC, VERSATILE SALSAS, EACH FEATURING THE FLAVOR OF A DIFFERENT CHILE.
Salsas That Cook is a breakthrough in contemporary American cooking. Here, Mexico's classic salsas get put to work in our kitchens in the same way we use a variety of international condiments, from teriyaki sauce to balsamic vinegar, to enliven and redefine the flavor of many American favorites. While most of us have enjoyed salsas as chip dips, salsas show great versatility when weaving complex flavor into simple dishes, from pasta to potatoes to meats, fish and vegetables.
Salsas embody the essence of Mexican flavor: the lusciousness of slow-roasted tomatoes, the full-flavored spice of chiles, the fragrance of cilantro and the mellow sweetness of garlic. Rick Bayless, the country's leading progenitor of real Mexican cooking, writes the six salsa recipes with such detail and personality that even beginning cooks will turn out masterful creations.
The uniqueness of this book, though, is in the way these six salsas are used. Here they give their pizzazz to chile-glazed roast chicken, grilled pork tenderloin and seared sea scallops with jalapeño cream. Familiar Mexican favorites have always used salsas for vitality, and many are here, from tangy guacamole to tortilla soup and grilled chicken tacos. In Salsas That Cook, the magic of Mexico transcends all borders.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Bayless (Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen, winner of the 1997 Julia Child Cookbook of the Year Award) courts the many cooks short on time with recipes that incorporate six salsas (such as the Roasted Jalapeno-Tomato Salsa or Chipotle-Cascabel Salsa with Roasted Tomatoes and Tomatillos), which can be prepared either in advance and refrigerated or purchased (Bayless recommends his own brand). Mexican-inspired dishes like Open-Face Quesadillas with Mushrooms, Olives, Salsa and Greens and Chilaquiles (tortilla casserole) with Spinach, Zucchini and Aged Cheese naturally work well. Also particularly successful are more familiar dishes to which salsa adds zip: Chipotle Mashed Potatoes, Slow-Grilled Turkey Breast with Mediterranean Salsa, Smoky Glazed Ham for a Crowd. The inclusion of salsa in every dish is usually a harmless gimmick; although in the introduction Bayless claims these dishes are quickly assembled by those who have salsa on hand, some entrees like Robust Beef Brisket with Red Chile and Winter Vegetables require long periods in the oven. Bayless offers sweet desserts that complement the spicy entrees like Frontera's Chocolate Pecan Bars and Texas Sheet Cake. Good Cook alternate. (Nov.)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780684856940
  • Publisher: Scribner
  • Publication date: 11/28/1998
  • Edition description: Original
  • Pages: 128
  • Sales rank: 269,891
  • Product dimensions: 8.10 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.40 (d)

Meet the Author

Rick Bayless is the coauthor of Authentic Mexican and Rick Bayless's Mexican Kitchen, for which he won the IACP Cookbook of the Year Award. He is also co-owner, with his wife, Deann, of two award-winning restaurants in Chicago and is a partner in Frontera Foods.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

Roasted Jalapeño-Tomato salsa with fresh cilantro

This is our salsa closest to the classic home-style Mexican salsa de molcajete that's made from roasted garlic and chiles pounded in a lava-rock mortar (molcajete) with roasted tomatoes. Even though we've updated the equipment for the modern American kitchen, that perfect blend of sweetness (roasted garlic and tomatoes) and raciness (roasted jalapeños) is what you'll spoon out. The final addition of fresh cilantro and a drizzle of vinegar focuses the whole experience: This is just what most Americans wish they were getting when they open a jar with that ubiquitous "salsa" label. Made with plum tomatoes, your salsa will have a more homogeneous texture — just right for using the salsa as an ingredient in other dishes. Because round tomatoes give a looser texture, choose them when you want a condiment to set on the table.

FOR 2 1/2 CUPS

Ripe tomatoes, preferably plum

1 1/2 pounds (about 10 medium plum)

Fresh jalapeño chiles, stemmed

2 to 3 (1 to 1 1/2 ounces)

White onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick

1/2 small (2 ounces)

Garlic cloves, peeled

4

Water

about 1/4 cup

Chopped fresh cilantro, loosely packed

1/3 cup

Salt

1 generous teaspoon

Cider vinegar

1 1/2 teaspoons

FOR 5 CUPS

Ripe tomatoes, preferably plum

3 pounds (about 20 medium plum)

Fresh jalapeño chiles, stemmed

4 to 6 (2 to 3 ounces)

White onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick

1 small (4 ounces)

Garlic cloves, peeled

8

Water

about 1/2 cup

Chopped fresh cilantro, loosely packed

2/3 Cup

Salt

2 generous teaspoons

Cider vinegar

1 tablespoon

FOR 7 1/2 CUPS

Ripe tomatoes, preferably plum

4 1/2 pounds (about 3O medium plum)

Fresh jalapeño chiles, stemmed

6 to 9 (3 to 4 1/2 ounces)

White onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick

1 medium (6 ounces)

Garlic cloves, peeled

12

Water

about 1/4 cup

Chopped fresh cilantro, loosely packed

I cup

Salt

1 generous tablespoon

Cider vinegar

1 1/2 tablespoons

  1. Heat the broiler. Lay the whole tomatoes and jalapeños out on a broiler pan or baking sheet. Set the pan 4 inches below the broiler and broil for about 6 minutes, until darkly roasted — even blackened in spots — on one side (the tomato skins will split and curl in places). With a pair of tongs, flip over the tomatoes and chiles and roast the other side for another 6 minutes or so. The goal is not simply to char the tomatoes and chiles but to cook them through while developing nice roasty flavors. Set aside to cool.
  2. Turn the oven down to 425 degrees. Separate the onions into rings. On a similar pan or baking sheet, combine the onion and garlic. Roast in the oven, stirring carefully every couple of minutes, until the onions are beautifully browned and wilted (even have a touch of char on some of the edges) and the garlic is soft and browned in spots, about 15 minutes total. Cool to room temperature.
  3. For a little less rustic texture or if you're canning the salsa, pull off the peels from the cooled tomatoes and cut out the "cores" where the stems were attached, working over your baking sheet so as not to waste any juices. In a food processor, pulse the jalapeños (no need to peel or seed them) with the onion and garlic until moderately finely chopped, scraping everything down with a spatula as needed to keep it all moving around. Scoop into a big bowl. Without washing the processor, coarsely puree the tomatoes — with all the juice that has accumulated around them — and add them to the bowl. Stir in enough water to give the salsa an easily spoonabie consistency. Stir in the cilantro.
  4. Taste and season with salt and vinegar, remembering that this condiment should be a little feisty in its seasoning. If you're planning to use your salsa right away, simply pour it into a bowl and it's ready, or refrigerate it covered and use within 5 days. If you're canning or freezing the salsa, please see page 21.

Variation:

Roasted Habanero-Tomato Salsa:

To make this very spicy, distinctively flavored salsa, replace the jalapeños with 2/4/6 stemmed habanero chiles (here I prefer the fruitier flavor of the orange habaneros to the less ripe — even grassy — flavor of the greens).

Other Fresh Chile Possibilities:

Habanero (orange or green), serrano, Santa Fe, Fresno, fresh pequin, Hungarian wax, fresh arbol, cayenne, Tabasco, as well as most small hot fresh chiles.

Dishes You Can Make With This Salsa:

Salsa-Baked Coat Cheese (page 41), Classic Red Tomato Rice (page 62), Breakfast Enchiladas (page 68), Today's Macaroni and Cheese (page 72), Toasty Fideos (Vermicelli) with Roasted Tomato, Black Beans and Chard (page 74), Spicy Jalapeño Beef Tips (page 97). Seared Sea Scallops with Jalapeño Cream (page 106)

Copyright © 1998 by Richard Lane Bayless

Roasted Tomatillo Salsa with serranos, roasted onions and cilantro

The native American husk-covered "tomato" known as tomatillo (it's a relative of the vining little ground cherry that grows wild all over the United States) is tang personified. But when you roast it, you mellow its precocious flavor into zesty richness. Serrano chiles deliver a fresh-green bite, while cilantro adds just the right herbal punch. If you've shied away from green salsas, finding them acrid and briny, try this very fresh tasting roasted tomatillo salsa and you'll be won back.

For 2 cups

Tomatillos, husked and rinsed

1 pound (7 medium)

Fresh serrano chiles, stemmed

4 to 5 (3/4 to 1 ounce)

White onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick

1 small (4 ounces)

Garlic cloves, peeled

3

Water

about 1/2 cup

Chopped fresh cilantro, loosely packed

1/3 cup

Salt

about 1 teaspoon

Sugar (optional)

1 teaspoon

For 4 cups

Tomatillos, husked and rinsed

2 pounds (about 14 medium)

Fresh serrano chiles, stemmed

8 to 10 (1 1/2 to 2 ounces)

White onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick

1 large (8 ounces)

Garlic cloves, peeled

6

Water

about 1 cup

Chopped fresh cilantro, loosely packed

2/3 cup

Salt

about 2 teaspoons

Sugar (optional)

2 teaspoons

For 6 cups

Tomatillos, husked and rinsed

3 pounds (21 medium)

Fresh serrano chiles, stemmed

12 to 15 (2 1/2 to 3 ounces)

White onion, sliced 1/4 inch thick

2 medium (12 ounces)

Garlic cloves, peeled

9

Water

about 1 1/2 cups

Chopped fresh cilantro, loosely packed

1 cup

Salt

about 1 tablespoon

Sugar (optional)

1 tablespoon

  1. Heat the broiler. Lay the whole tomatillos and serranos on a broiler pan or baking sheet. Set the pan 4 inches below the broiler and let roast until the tomatillos are softened and splotchy black in places (the skins will split), about 5 minutes; your goal is to cook the tomatillos through while they roast, which means they'll change from light bright green to olive green on the top side. With a pair of tongs, flip over the tomatillos and chiles and roast the other side for another 4 to 5 minutes or so. Set aside to cool.
  2. Turn the oven down to 425 degrees. Separate the onion into rings and, on a similar pan or baking sheet, combine them with the garlic. Place in the oven. Stir carefully every couple of minutes, until the onions are beautifully browned. (They're going to look wilted and translucent, even have a touch of char on some of the edges.) The garlic should feel soft and be browned in spots. The total roasting time will be about 15 minutes. Cool to room temperature.
  3. In a food processor, place the onion-garlic mixture and the serranos, and pulse until moderately finely chopped, scraping everything down with a spatula as needed to keep it all moving. Scoop the mixture into a large bowl. Without washing the processor, coarsely puree the tomatillos with their juice — no need to peel off their darkened skin or cut out their cores. Stir them into the chiles. Stir in enough water to give the salsa an easily spoonable consistency. Stir in the cilantro.
  4. Taste and season highly with salt. Taste again and, if you like, add just enough sugar to take the edge off the bright tanginess of the tomatillos. If you're planning to use your salsa right away, simply pour it into a bowl and it's ready, or refrigerate it covered and use within 5 days. If you're canning or freezing the salsa, please see page 21.

Other Fresh Chile Possibilities:

Jalapeño, Santa Fe, Fresno, fresh pequin, finger hots, Hungarian wax.

Dishes You Can Make With This Salsa:

Tangy Green Guacamole (page 40), Emerald Corn Chowder (page 53), Tangy Lentil Salad (page 58), Scalloped Potatoes (page 64), Open-Face Chorizo Potato Omelet (page 67), Tomatillo-Baked Chicken Breasts (page 85), Tomatillo-Braised Pork Loin (page 98), Green Chile Crab Cakes (page 107)

Copyright © 1998 by Richard Lane Bayless

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

CONTENTS

INTRODUCTION

  1. SALSAS

    ROASTED JALAPEÑO-TOMATO SALSA WITH FRESH CILANTRO

    ROASTED POBLANO-TOMATO SALSA WITH FRESH THYME

    ROASTED TOMATILLO SALSA WITH SERRANOS, ROASTED ONIONS AND CILANTRO

    MELLOW RED CHILE SALSA WITH SWEET GARLIC AND ROASTED TOMATOES

    ROASTY RED GUAJILLO SALSA WITH TANGY TOMATILLOS AND SWEET GARLIC

    CHIPOTLE-CASCABEL SALSA WITH ROASTED TOMATOES AND TOMATILLOS

  2. STARTERS

    TANGY GREEN GUACAMOLE

    SALSA-BAKED GOAT CHEESE

    OPEN-FACE QUESADILLAS WITH MUSHROOMS, OLIVES, SALSA AND GREENS

    TINY TOSTADAS OF SMOKY CHICKEN TINGA WITH AVOCADO AND AGED CHEESE

    SWEET-AND-SPICY CHILIED PORK EMPANADAS

    CRISPY MASA BOAT SMACKS WITH BLACK BEANS, SALSA, AVOCADO AND MEXICAN CHEESE

    SHRIMP IN RED ESCABECHE

    MICROWAVED "BAKED" CHIPS

  3. SOUPS, SALADS AND SIDE DISHES

    GREAT TORTILLA SOUP

    EMERALD CORN CHOWDER WITH ROASTED TOMATTILOS AND POBLANO

    SHRIMP SALPICÓN SALAD WITH POTATOES, AVOCADOS AND CHIPOTLE

    RED CHILE-JÍCAMA SALAD WITH ORANGE AND RED ONION

    POBLANO-ROASTED VEGETABLE SALAD WITH PEPPERY WATERCRESS

    TANGY LENTIL SALAD WITH SPINACH, CILANTRO AND CHAYOTE

    GUAJILLO GRILLED VEGETABLES

    CLASSIC RED TOMATO RICE

    CHIPOTLE MASHED POTATOES

    SCALLOPED POTATOES WITH ROASTED TOMATILLOS, SERRANOS AND CILANTRO

  4. EGG, VEGETABLE, PASTA AND TORTILLA MAIN COURSES

    RACY EGGPLANT OMELETS WITH SAVORY RED CHILE

    OPEN-FACE CHORIZO-POTATO OMELET WITH TOMATILLO SALSA

    BREAKFAST ENCHILADAS OF SCRAMBLED EGGS, WOODLAND MUSHROOMS AND SPICY ROASTED TOMATOES

    SAVORY BRUNCH BREAD PUDDING

    RED CHILE PASTA

    TODAY'S MACARONI AND CHEESE — IT'S NOT JUST FORKIDS

    SPICY VEGETABLE "STEW"

    TOASTY FIDEOS (VERMICELLI) WITH ROASTED TOMATO, BLACK BEANS AND CHARD

    CHILAQUILES (TORTILLA CASSEROLE) WITH SPINACH, ZUCCHINI AND AGED CHEESE

    SEARED RED-CHILE ENCHILADAS WITH CHICKEN AND AGED CHEESE

    LAYERED TORTILLA "LASAGNA" WITH GREENS AND CHEESE

  5. POULTRY, MEAT AND FISH MAIN COURSES

    CHILE-GLAZED ROAST CHICKEN

    TOMATILLO-BAKED CHICKEN BREASTS WITH ROASTED ASPARAGUS

    SOFT TACOS OF GRILLED CHICKEN BREAST WITH TANGY GREEN CHILE AND GRILLED ONIONS

    BURNISHED CORNISH HENS WITH ROASTED ONIONS AND SWEET POTATOES

    SLOW-GRILLED TURKEY BREAST (OR LAMB LEG) WITH MEDITERRANEAN SALSA

    ROBUST BEEF BRISKET WITH RED CHILE AND WINTER VEGETABLES

    PEPPERY PAN-SEARED STEAKS WITH SMOKY CREMA AND BLUE CHEESE

    CHORIZO AND BLACK BEAN CHILI

    SPICY JALAPEÑO BEEF TIPS

    TOMATILLO-BRAISED PORK LOIN WITH HERBY WHITE BEANS AND BACON

    GRILLED-AND-GLAZED PORK TENDERLOIN WITH MUSTARDY SWEET ONIONS

    SMOKY GLAZED HAM FOR A CROWD

    GUAJILLO-SPIKED SHELLFISH SOUP

    RED CHILE RICE WITH SHRIMP AND BACON

    SEARED SEA SCALLOPS WITH JALAPEÑO CREAM

    GREEN CHILE CRAB CAKES

    RED-GLAZED WHOLE FISH

    POBLANO-BAKED FISH FILLETS

  6. DESSERTS AND DRINKS

    FRONTERA'S CHOCOLATE PECAN PIE BARS

    TEXAS SHEET CAKE

    MEXICAN CHOCOLATE ICE-CREAM CONES

    PALETAS MEXICANAS (MEXICAN FRUIT POPS)

    SANGRITA — TRADITIONAL SPICY TEQUILA CHASER

    HONEST-TO-GOODNESS MARGARITAS FOR A CROWD

    MAIL-ORDER SOURCES

    INDEX

Read More Show Less

Recipe

Dip Made Easy by Rick Bayless

Probably the easiest way to have something deliciously unexpected on the table is to combine goat cheese with cream cheese, stir in a few toasted nuts, douse it with salsas, and bake until warm. Everyone loves it -- whether it's piping hot or cooled to room temperature, served with chips or crackers or slices of French bread. Serve real, fresh-lime margaritas shaken over ice and you've got as festive a party as you could hope for.

SALSA-BAKED GOAT CHEESE

(Serves 4 to 6 as a nibble with tortilla chips, pita triangles, crackers, or crispy toasts)

¼ cup pine nuts or coarsely chopped walnuts or pecans

1 4-ounce log of goat cheese (there are flavored goat cheeses available, some of which can be good with the salsa, but think about the flavor combination before making your purchase)

1 3-ounce package of cream cheese, softened

1 cup Roasted Jalapeno-Tomato Salsa (found on page 23 of SALSAS THAT COOK; if you like really spicy food, use the habanero variation of that salsa)

A tablespoon or so chopped fresh cilantro, for garnish

1. Heat the oven to 350 degrees. Spread out the nuts on a baking sheet and toast them in the oven until lightly browned and very fragrant, 7 or 8 minutes (the pine nuts will brown quicker than either of the others). Remove and slide them off into a medium-size bowl.

2. Add the cheeses to the bowl and combine thoroughly with the nuts. Scoop it in the center of a baking dish (I like to use a decorative 9-inch pie pan) and form it into a 5-inch-diameter disk. Spoon the salsa over and around the cheese. Place the dish in the oven and bake until heated through, 10 to 15 minutes. Sprinkle the cilantro on top, and set it out for your guests to enjoy as a dip or a spread.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 21, 2000

    Good stuff!

    The author begins by giving you 6 different classic salsa recipes, then uses those salsas to create a slew of dishes. There is a good blend of muy autentico dishes and some modern variations. Mexican cooking has yet to take its place on the world culinary stage, but with more cookbooks like this, it undoubtedly will. I enjoyed this so much I went and bought another of his books. The only possible drawback is that you may not be able to find one or two of the ingredients in a given recipe. But don't let that stop you - you can always find what you need on the Internet! The flavors of these dishes are vibrant and bold - the recipe for Tortilla Soup is dynamite!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 14, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)