Sam [NOOK Book]

Overview

Sam is young and life is rough. He has many struggles to over come form college to a first crush. In this series of short stories Sam goes to college, gets hurt, moves home, finds a boyfriend and finally meets his last and possible worst challenge.

In My Struggle Sam is just entering college when he meets Shawn. He seems like a great guy at least a first. Sam is taken by him until Shawn says a f

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Sam

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More About This Book

Overview

Sam is young and life is rough. He has many struggles to over come form college to a first crush. In this series of short stories Sam goes to college, gets hurt, moves home, finds a boyfriend and finally meets his last and possible worst challenge.

In My Struggle Sam is just entering college when he meets Shawn. He seems like a great guy at least a first. Sam is taken by him until Shawn says a f

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940044618084
  • Publisher: Corinth Panther
  • Publication date: 5/28/2013
  • Sold by: Smashwords
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 135,923
  • File size: 167 KB

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 3 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

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2 Star

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1 Star

(1)

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 14, 2014

    Dreadful. I have never grasped the concept of "hate-watc

    Dreadful.

    I have never grasped the concept of "hate-watching" before. As I understand it, it's when you watch a show you used to enjoy, but it's gone off course, and now you only continue to watch it because you want the characters to suffer. I couldn't fathom anything like that. And then I read Sam. In fanfiction, there is a type of character called a "Mary Sue." Mary Sue can do everything from balancing a checkbook to piloting a starship, and she can do it better than those whose job it is to do whatever she stumbles into. Typically all of the characters fall in love with her, and things work out perfectly for her. That said, meet Sam. He is Mary Sue. He is a black belt, he teaches self defense, he somehow graduates from a four-year university in two years. In only two years on the job, he manages to save up enough to buy a house - then decides to make payments anyway, just because he can. Sam is judgmental in the extreme. He comments about his perfect use of English and grammar, which honestly had me in hysterics. There are so many typos, spelling errors, half-formed sentences, and obvious grammar errors (plus an abundance of "you're/your, its/it's" screw-ups), I burst out laughing when that line appeared. About a third of the way through the book, I had grown to dislike the lead. Since it's first-person, that can be a problem. I kept hoping someone would accidentally run him over in a parking lot. By the time the "big shocking event" happened, I had stopped caring and was hoping he would at least lose a limb. Oh no, not Mary Sue. Sam. Whichever. There is a glaringly obvious problem with the timeline as well. He graduates high school at 18. He goes to a four year university. He then transfers to another school. By the age of 24 (meaning, two years after college graduation), having paid off all student loans, paid off a car, paying rent and utilities, he has enough in savings to buy a house. Wait, what? The story makes it clear Sam had no job before graduating college, and his parents paid for nothing more than his first two years in college. Everything else, he had to pay for himself. I know architects (the profession Sam was in), and no one makes that kind of money straight out of college. And probably not without at least a decade in the job already, with several high profile jobs already on record. It's sort of like the series Friends. In the real world, the six characters' incomes combined wouldn't pay for even the smallest of those apartments. I would be remiss if I forgot to mention Lee. He's Australian. We know this because he says "Mate" at the end of sentences. There is no such thing as character development. It's like someone heard "Crickey, Mate!" one time and thought all Australians said "Mate" all day long. Then again, why create real characters when cheap stereotypes are so much easier?

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 3, 2013

    Great

    Very good

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 11, 2013

    Awesome and sweet

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews

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