Samantha

Samantha

by Ellen Stoll Walsh
     
 
The author of You Silly Goose tells the tale of a little girl, Samantha, who wishes for a fairy godmother to protect her from her bigger, rougher older brothers and sisters. When her godmother finally appears, Samantha finds safe haven under her wings. She watches the others run and play and wonders if maybe she's a little

Overview

The author of You Silly Goose tells the tale of a little girl, Samantha, who wishes for a fairy godmother to protect her from her bigger, rougher older brothers and sisters. When her godmother finally appears, Samantha finds safe haven under her wings. She watches the others run and play and wonders if maybe she's a little

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Cahners\\Publishers_Weekly
Feisty mice akin to the heroes of Mouse Paint and Mouse Count trip and tumble across the festive cut-paper collages in this beguiling book. After Samantha, the tiniest and most timid of the brood, wishes aloud for a fairy godmother to protect her from her siblings ('Oh, how they could tease'), a winged, pastel-colored mouse appears. While the others romp happily, Samantha's guardian keeps her 'quietly out of the way' and shields her from the rain and snow. Realizing that that she is missing out on all the fun, the wee mouse decides to take her chances playing with the others, and she rather rudely dismisses her protector, who, luckily, does not wander too far away. This vivacious tale gives a reassuring nudge to kids who could stand to be more self-reliant, yet even the boldest young readers will warm up to Walsh's rambunctious rodent capers.
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Feisty mice akin to the heroes of Mouse Paint and Mouse Count trip and tumble across the festive cut-paper collages in this beguiling book. After Samantha, the tiniest and most timid of the brood, wishes aloud for a fairy godmother to protect her from her siblings ("Oh, how they could tease"), a winged, pastel-colored mouse appears. While the others romp happily, Samantha's guardian keeps her "quietly out of the way" and shields her from the rain and snow. Realizing that that she is missing out on all the fun, the wee mouse decides to take her chances playing with the others, and she rather rudely dismisses her protector, who, luckily, does not wander too far away. This vivacious tale gives a reassuring nudge to kids who could stand to be more self-reliant, yet even the boldest young readers will warm up to Walsh's rambunctious rodent capers. Ages 3-8. (Mar.)
Children's Literature - Rae Valabek
Samantha, the smallest mouse in the family, wishes for a fairy godmother to protect her from her rough older brothers and sisters. Soon Samantha realizes that she is missing out on a lot of fun and adventure. When her fairy godmother disappears, Samantha realizes that she still needs her fairy godmother for a little while longer. The drawings of the mouse children are very similar to the torn paper mice in Leo Lionni's book, Frederick.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-Small Samantha mouse wishes for a fairy godmother to defend her from her teasing and roughhousing siblings. Unfortunately, staying safe means missing out on a lot of fun when her blue-furred supporter turns out to be overly protective. Finally, newly independent Samantha and her understanding godmother work out a mutually agreeable compromise. Walsh's charming collage mice in shades of brown seem to be close relatives of those in Mouse Paint (1989) and Mouse Count (1991, both Harcourt). Samantha is a pleasing combination of a short, well-told story and simple but expressive illustrations. A good read-aloud.-Eunice Weech, M. L. King Elementary School, Urbana, IL
Ilene Cooper
Samantha is a little mouse who gets rough-and-tumbled a bit too much by her bigger brothers and sisters. She thinks that perhaps a fairy godmother might be needed for protection. And when a fairy godmother appears, she's no slacker. She keeps Samantha in a protective bubble, but Samantha soon realizes that although she's safe, she isn't having much fun. Finally, she yells at her fairy godmother to go away. Now Samantha is having more fun, but no one's taking care. When Samantha falls in a snowdrift, the fairy godmother is still close enough to pull her out. From then on, the fairy godmother is on call, but only for emergencies. More message than story, this doesn't have the zip of some of Walsh's other mouse tales. What kids will like more are the adorable cut-paper mice who frolic against an expanse of white. As usual, they are readily identifiable with the children who are reading about them.
Kirkus Reviews
The popular cut-paper collage mice return to help Walsh (Pip's Magic, 1994, etc.) with a gentle lesson about feeling safe. Samantha is the smallest of the mouse children and frequently finds herself overwhelmed by the others' rough-and-tumble teasing. When her wish for a fairy godmother comes true, she sits safely and comfortably on the sidelines, but comes to realize that she is missing out on fun. Samantha once again gets her wish when she sends the fairy godmother away, and sorely misses the companionship. When the two reunite, it's with a new understanding about the level of protection that Samantha needs.

The individuality possible in mice formed from torn, highly textured brown paper is surprising, and the contrasting soft blue of the fairy godmother works well. Reminiscent of Leo Lionni's minimalist fare, this personable piece will find an audience in all toddlers taking their first timid steps toward independence.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780152522643
Publisher:
Harcourt Children's Books
Publication date:
03/01/1996
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
7.56(w) x 9.39(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile:
830L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 8 Years

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