Same, Same But Different

Same, Same But Different

4.0 1
by Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw
     
 

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Elliot lives in America, and Kailash lives in India. They are pen pals. By exchanging letters and pictures, they learn that they both love to climb trees, have pets, and go to school. Their worlds might look different, but they are actually similar. Same, same. But different!

Through an inviting point-of-view and colorful, vivid illustrations, this story

Overview

Elliot lives in America, and Kailash lives in India. They are pen pals. By exchanging letters and pictures, they learn that they both love to climb trees, have pets, and go to school. Their worlds might look different, but they are actually similar. Same, same. But different!

Through an inviting point-of-view and colorful, vivid illustrations, this story shows how two boys living oceans apart can be the best of friends.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
The theme of commonalities among the world's children is a familiar one, so readers aren't likely to be surprised that a city-dwelling American boy and his pen pal in rural India have a lot in common, even if those similarities are embodied in different ways. But Kostecki-Shaw (My Travelin' Eye) makes her tribute to brotherhood sing in a way that feels fresh and inviting. Both of her heroes are anchored by warm, caring home lives: for Elliot, that means living with his parents and baby sister in a brick row house, while Kailash shares a farm with 23 members of his extended family "and our animals." Elliot uses art to fuel his imagination, while Kailash uses yoga. "Same, same but different" is Kostecki-Shaw's refrain, but what keeps it from being saccharine or pedestrian are her terrific naïf, mixed-media pictures. Working in exuberantly detailed spreads with a playful sense of proportion and perspective, she immerses readers in her heroes' worlds, showing them as confident navigators of even the busiest landscapes. On every page, readers will sense they're in the company of a generous, open-minded talent. Ages 4–7. (Sept.)
From the Publisher

“There is considerable usage potential here, from art projects to classroom community projects to diversity awareness projects…there's also plenty of pleasure to be found just in sharing the thoughtful story and perusing the artwork.” —BCCB

“Young readers will close the book longing to have a friend from another place; for schools with global partnerships, this will be a go-to book for introducing these projects to classrooms.” —Horn Book Magazine

“The imaginative multimedia illustrations, drawn in an animated, childlike style, add vibrant color and rich details to the story. Kostecki-Shaw presents a meaningful message of inclusivity in this engaging title.” —SLJ

“Working in exuberantly detailed spreads with a playful sense of proportion and perspective, she [Kostecki-Shaw] immerses readers in her heroes' worlds, showing them as confident navigators of even the busiest landscapes. On every page, readers will sense they're in the company of a generous, open-minded talent.” —PW

“Purposeful, but saved from didacticism by the sheer exuberance of the illustrations; the accessible text introduces the idea of traditional two-way communication and demonstrates just how small our world can be.” —Kirkus

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
Elliot, a young American boy, tells of sending a picture of his world to a boy in India. From there, young Kailash sends a picture back. The boys become pen pals, telling each other what they like to do, and what their homes and families are like. As they exchange questions and informative answers, the noted refrain is, "...same, same but different." Kailash's village has peacocks, umbrella trees, and a hot sun. The sun hides behind tall buildings in Elliot's busy city. But both ride a school bus in busy, yet different traffic. They compare alphabets, favorite classes, and ways of greeting friends. Elliot notes that they are best friends living in two different worlds, different but yet the same in many ways. The double pages are crowded with examples of animals and objects mentioned in the very brief bits of text, often cleverly placed on a camel cart, the side of a skyscraper, or flowing along a river. The different life styles are depicted with acrylics, crayon, pencil, collage, and tissue paper. Although clearly representational, there is a light-hearted character to the people and settings. The boys are a bit cartoonish, with oversized heads. Be sure to check the different jacket and cover and the cancelled American and Indian postage stamps on the end pages of this cross-cultural story. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
Gr 1–2—While traveling in Southeast Asia, the author learned the popular saying that inspired this charming story of friendship and universal connections. In an American city, Elliott paints a picture of his world as part of a school project. His teacher mails it "across the oceans" to Kailash, who soon replies with his own drawing. Elliott lives in a city where tall buildings hide the sun, and cars and taxis crowd the roads. Kailash is growing up near a river in a village where "peacocks dance under trees shaped like umbrellas." Although their worlds seem different, the boys are not. They discover that they both like animals, enjoy climbing trees, and ride the bus to school. The correspondents compare their cultures and eventually they decide that their worlds aren't so different after all. The imaginative multimedia illustrations, drawn in an animated, childlike style, add vibrant color and rich details to the story. Kostecki-Shaw presents a meaningful message of inclusivity in this engaging title. Like Elliott and Kailash, young readers will conclude that children from other cultures are "different, different but the SAME!"—Linda L. Walkins, Mount Saint Joseph Academy, Brighton, MA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781429961578
Publisher:
Henry Holt and Co. (BYR)
Publication date:
09/13/2011
Sold by:
Macmillan
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
36
Sales rank:
739,894
File size:
24 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Meet the Author

Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw is the author and illustrator of My Travelin' Eye. She is a freelance illustrator who studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and The Illustration Academy. She lives in the mountains of Northern New Mexico with her family.


Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw is the author and illustrator of My Travelin’ Eye. She is a freelance illustrator who studied at the Kansas City Art Institute and The Illustration Academy. She lives in the mountains of Northern New Mexico with her family.

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Same, Same But Different 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Heidi_G More than 1 year ago
Two boys, one in the U.S. and one in India, are penpals, exchanging letters about their lives.  They (and the reader) learn that despite living in two different places, that their lives are similar in many respects.  The colorful multi-media illustrations are superb and really add to the story.  Parents and teachers might remember being penpals with a child living in a different country but students today have instant access through social media, so pre-teaching about the long-lost art of letter writing would be helpful.  A great story to begin a unit on global awareness for the elementary-age set.  Pair with "Off to Class:  Incredible and Unusual Schools Around the World by Susan Hughes.