Sammy and the Dinosaurs

Sammy and the Dinosaurs

5.0 1
by Ian Whybrow, Adrian Reynolds
     
 
Sammy discovers a box of dusty toy dinosaurs in the attic. He cleans them and takes them everywhere, including the library where he looks up all of their names, which he whispers to them. And the dinosaurs whisper their thanks. Sammy is devastated when he accidentally leaves his dinosaurs on tire train. But in the end, Sammy and his dinosaurs are reunited because he

Overview

Sammy discovers a box of dusty toy dinosaurs in the attic. He cleans them and takes them everywhere, including the library where he looks up all of their names, which he whispers to them. And the dinosaurs whisper their thanks. Sammy is devastated when he accidentally leaves his dinosaurs on tire train. But in the end, Sammy and his dinosaurs are reunited because he knows their names.

Editorial Reviews

Horn Book
(Preschool)
When Sammy finds a dusty old box of dinosaurs in the attic, he decides to fix them, clean them, and find them a better dwelling: "'Dinosaurs don't like boxes,' Sammy said. 'They want to be in a bucket.'" At the library, Sammy learns to identify each one, and pronounces its name there and then: "'You are my Scelidosaurus. You are my Stegosaurus. You are my Triceratops.'... "The dinosaurs said, 'Thank you, Sammy.' They said it very quietly, but just loud enough for Sammy to hear." The story walks a fine line between fantasy and realism. The vibrantly colored pen-and-watercolor illustrations show the dinosaurs in motion, but they are most animated when adults aren't watching, and they never speak loudly enough for anyone else to hear. Sammy and the mischievous dinosaurs become inseparable, and the affection each feels for the other is clear in joyfully expressive drawings that show people and dinosaurs with dot eyes and simple flowing outlines. When Sammy leaves his bucket of dinosaurs on a train, the tragedy is instantly understandable to the reader, but less so to Sammy's family. When they try to distract him with videos, he explains why he prefers his dinosaurs: "You can fix them, you can bathe them, you can take them to bed. And best of all, you can say their names." Of course, all ends well with the dinosaurs showing up at the train station's Lost and Found, where Sammy must prove they are his by calling each by name. The story, alternately humorous and poignant, is beautifully written and always right on target. Dialogue is used precisely and with especially satisfying effect, particularly at the very end of the story. Endpapers show all six dinosaurs frolicking in a repeating pattern-with each one named, of course. lolly robinson
Children's Literature - Children's Literature
In this delightful picture book, young Sammy finds some toy dinosaurs in an old dusty box in his attic. While his sister says they are junk, Sammy knows better. After cleaning and fixing the dinosaurs, he identifies each one. As he does, each dinosaur answers him back. Sammy and his dinosaurs enjoy each other's company until the dinosaurs get misplaced. How Sammy retrieves them will titillate young readers and their parents. The colorful, lively illustrations accompany the text beautifully. A real treat. 1999, Orchard Books, Ages 3 to 6, $15.95. Reviewer: Rebecca Joseph.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2 This imaginative story about a young boy and the dinosaurs that he finds in his grandmother's attic is a delight from endpaper to endpaper. Sammy washes the little toys, repairs them, and finds a special bucket for them to live in. He goes to the library to identify them, and begins to take them everywhere he goes. They go to the beach and to the garden store, and take baths together. The dinosaurs even begin to talk to the child, but only he can hear them. One day, the small creatures are left behind on the train. Sammy is devastated, until Gran takes him to the train station's lost and found. He calls to each of his dinosaurs, and they return to him. The originality of this story is matched by the lifelike personalities exhibited in the cartoon illustrations. The dinosaurs appear to come to life as they show expressions and emotions while traveling with Sammy. A charming fantasy that will captivate youngsters. JoAnn Jonas, New York Public Library Copyright 1999 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
The utterly winsome Sammy (and his crabby, TV-narcotized sister) is featured in a fine little story from Whybrow (The Snow King, p. 806, etc.) about the pleasures of friends who happen to be of a different species. Up in the attic with his grandmother, Sammy comes across a box full of old dinosaur toys. He shuttles the box downstairs, doctors the dinosaurs that need doctoring, bathes and buffs them all, and then, next day, trundles to the library to discover their names. While this is going on, captured in handsome pen-and-wash artwork, the beasts shuffle about, but only to Sammy's knowledge. When every one of them is properly bestowed with a name—anchisaurus, brontosaurus, scelidosaurus, etc.—the dinosaurs say, `' `Thank you, Sammy.' They said it very quietly, but just loud enough for Sammy to hear." Now fast friends, they nonetheless become separated when Sammy inadvertently leaves them on the train. Sammy is deeply unhappy; he inquires after them at the station, but the "Lost and Found" man says, "How do we know they are your dinosaurs?" A blind-identification test confirms that fact: `' `All correct!' said the man. `These are definitely your dinosaurs! Definitely!'Ê`' Quietly, the dinosaurs concur: `'Ê`You're definitely our Sammy. Definitely!'Ê`' This is a beautiful, cheering story full of offbeat charm. (Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780531302071
Publisher:
Scholastic, Inc.
Publication date:
09/01/1999
Edition description:
1 AMER ED
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
8.85(w) x 10.59(h) x 0.36(d)
Lexile:
220L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 6 Years

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Sammy and the Dinosaurs 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
My son is 2 1/2 and this is by far his favorite book. Great little story and the illustrations are delightful. Best part of all it's as entertaining for me during bedtime reading as it is for him!