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Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days
     

Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days

4.5 6
by Jesse Liberty
 

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Join the leagues of thousands of programmers and learn C++ from some of the best. The fifth edition of the best seller Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days, written by Jesse Liberty, a well-known C++ and C# programming manual author and Bradley L. Jones, manager for a number of high profiler developer websites, has been updated to the new ANSI/ISO C++ Standard

Overview

Join the leagues of thousands of programmers and learn C++ from some of the best. The fifth edition of the best seller Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days, written by Jesse Liberty, a well-known C++ and C# programming manual author and Bradley L. Jones, manager for a number of high profiler developer websites, has been updated to the new ANSI/ISO C++ Standard. This is an excellent hands-on guide for the beginning programmer. Packed with examples of syntax and detailed analysis of code, fundamentals such as managing I/O, loops, arrays and creating C++ applications are all covered in the 21 easy-to-follow lessons. You will also be given access to a website that will provide you will all the source code examples developed in the book as a practice tool. C++ is the preferred language for millions of developers-make Sams Teach Yourself the preferred way to learn it!

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
This guide is designed to teach the basics of C++ programming language to beginners using the familiar one-a-day chapter format. The chapters carry the reader through the history of the program and its basic anatomy, and into variables and constants, expressions and statements, functions, object-oriented programming, looping, pointers, references, and advanced functions<-->including the default constructor and operator overloading, object-oriented analysis and design, inheritance, arrays and linked lists, polymorphism, streams, namespaces, templates, exceptions and error handling. Liberty has published numerous guides to C++. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780768689976
Publisher:
Pearson Education
Publication date:
12/14/2004
Series:
Sams Teach Yourself
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
936
Sales rank:
1,272,928
File size:
21 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.

Read an Excerpt

Chapter 1: Getting Started

Introduction

Welcome to Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days! Today you will get started on your way to becoming a proficient C++ programmer.

Today you will learn

  • Why C++ is the emerging standard in software development.
  • The steps to develop a C++ program.
  • How to enter, compile, and link your first working C++ program.

A Brief History of C++

Computer languages have undergone dramatic evolution since the first electronic computers were built to assist in artillery trajectory calculations during World War II. Early on, programmers worked with the most primitive computer instructions: machine language. These instructions were represented by long strings of ones and zeros. Soon. assemblers were invented to nap machine instructions to human-readable and -manageable mnemonics, such as ADD and MOV.

In time, higher-level languages evolved, such as BASIC and COBOL. These languages let people work with something approximating words and sentences, such as Let I = 100. These instructions were translated back into machine language by interpreters and compilers.

An interpreter translates a program as it reads it, turning the program instructions, or code, directly into actions. A compiler translates the code into an intermediary form. This step is called compiling, and it produces an object file. The compiler then invokes a linker, which turns the object file into an executable program.

Because interpreters read the code as it is written and execute the code on the spot, interpreters are easy for the programmer to work with. Today, most interpreted programs are referred to as scripts, and the interpreter itself is often called a Script Engine.

Some languages, such as Visual Basic, call the interpreter the runtime library. .lava calls its runtime interpreter a Virtual Machine (VM), but in this case the VM is provided by the browser (such as Internet Explorer or Netscape).

Compilers introduce the extra steps of compiling the source code (which is readable by humans) into object code (which is readable by machines). This extra step is inconvenient, but compiled programs run very fast because the time-consuming task of translating the source code into machine language is done once (at compile time) and is not required when you execute the program. Another advantage of many compiled languages such as C++ is that you can distribute the executable program to people who don't have the compiler. With an interpreted ]an

For many years, the principal goal of computer programmers was to write short pieces of code that would execute quickly. The program needed to be small because memory was expensive, and it needed to be fast because processing power was also expensive. As computers have become smaller, cheaper, and faster, and as the cost of memory has fallen, these priorities have changed. Today the cost of a programmers time far outweighs the cost of most of the computers in use by businesses. Well-written, easy-to-maintain code is at a premium. Easy to maintain means that as business requirements change, the program can be extended and enhanced without great expense...

Meet the Author

Jesse Liberty is the author of numerous books on software development, including best-selling titles in C++ and .NET. He is the president of Liberty Associates, Inc. (http://www.LibertyAssociates.com) where he provides custom programming, consulting, and training.

Bradley Jones, Microsoft MVP, Visual C++, can be referred to as a webmaster, manager, coding grunt, executive editor, and various other things. His time and focus are on a number of software development sites and channels, including Developer.com, CodeGuru.com, DevX, VBForums, Gamelan, and other Jupitermedia-owned sites. This influence expands over sites delivering content to over 2.5 million unique developers a month.

His expertise is in the area of the big "C"s–C, C++, and C#–however, his experience includes development in PowerBuilder, VB, some Java, ASP, COBOL I/II, and various other technologies too old to even mention now. He has also been a consultant, analyst, project lead, associate publisher for major technical publishers, and author. His recent authoring credits include Sams Teach Yourself the C# Language in 21 Days, a 6th edition of Sams Teach Yourself C in 21 Days, and now this edition of Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days. He is also the cofounder and president of the Indianapolis .NET Developers Association, which is a charter INETA group with membership of over 700. You can often hear his ramblings on the CodeGuru.com or VBForums.com discussion forums, and he also does the weekly CodeGuru newsletter that goes out to tens of thousands of developers.

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Sams Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 6 reviews.
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Guest More than 1 year ago
C++ is a mother for many others programming language in the world. So learning how this mother language does her job can give every one strong understanding about how her children do their job too.And this book has given me that.Thank you
Guest More than 1 year ago
Having been a C developer (long ago),this was the best book I've found to ramp back up to C++ in short order. Explains details well and includes nice things like discussions on how data is stored in memory.