Sams Teach Yourself Exchange Server 2003 in 10 Minutes

Overview

In your daily maintenance routine of your company's Microsoft Exchange Server, you probably run into bumps along the way. Sams Teach Yourself Exchange Server 2003 in 10 Minutes is a great, quick-reference guide to the most common tasks you perform as an Exchange Server administrator. Use this guide as a basis for practical knowledge and solutions to problems with managing mailboxes, performing database maintenance, Outlook Web access, performance optimization and group policy management. When all you need is a ...

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Overview

In your daily maintenance routine of your company's Microsoft Exchange Server, you probably run into bumps along the way. Sams Teach Yourself Exchange Server 2003 in 10 Minutes is a great, quick-reference guide to the most common tasks you perform as an Exchange Server administrator. Use this guide as a basis for practical knowledge and solutions to problems with managing mailboxes, performing database maintenance, Outlook Web access, performance optimization and group policy management. When all you need is a quick-hit of information so you can quickly get back to work, Sams Teach Yourself Exchange Server 2003 in 10 Minutes is your best option.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780672327247
  • Publisher: Sams
  • Publication date: 10/13/2005
  • Series: Sams Teach Yourself Series
  • Pages: 240
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Dan Balter, MCSE, CNE, (Venice, CA) is the Chief Technology Officer for InfoTechnology Partners, Inc. and works as a successful, independent consultant and trainer for both corporate and government clients. He is certified as a Microsoft Systems Engineer (MCSE) and held the Novell NetWare Engineer (CNE) designation for several years. Dan has authored more than 250 computer-training videos on various Microsoft technologies (including Exchange and Windows Server) and has coauthored several well-received books.

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Read an Excerpt

IntroductionIntroduction

The primary goal of this book is to provide Exchange 2003 users with a series of lessons that provide information and examples of the procedures that are most important to Exchange administrators and power users. Each lesson is designed to take about 10 minutes to read. The lessons are based on my experiences, in house and out in the field, supporting Exchange organizations of all sizes. Those experiences helped me determine what features and topics would be most useful to a broad audience. I also used feedback from end-user training participants and instructors of administrator training classes to further fine-tune the lessons.Who Is This Book For?

This book targets three specific audiences:

  • End users—Entry-level individuals who have had limited or no exposure to Exchange 2003.

  • Power users—Users who have intermediate- to advanced-level knowledge of Exchange 2003.

  • Exchange administrators—Individuals who are tasked with daily administration and support of Exchange 2003.

In my experience, I have found that many individuals tasked to be Exchange Administrators lack significant technical expertise and training. The early lessons in the book will be helpful in getting them "up to speed." As readers become more familiar with Exchange 2003 features and functionality, the later lessons will help them in using more advanced features.How Is This Book Organized?

The information and examples provided in this book apply to Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 with SP1. Prior versions of Exchange—Exchange 2000 and Exchange 5.x—are not covered in this book. Administrative proceduresthat require a workstation were performed with Windows XP SP1+ with Internet Explorer 6.0 and all available service packs. Although other operating systems and Internet browsers can be used for administration in some cases, they may provide results and functionality different from those explained in the pages of this book.Goals for Part I

Part I of this book is written for users who are new to Exchange or need to refresh their knowledge of Exchange 2003 Server. The part introduces the reader to Exchange 2003 by providing information on new features, removed features, installation requirements, Active Directory, and more. Ideally, these lessons will be read in order by those new to Exchange, because the information builds on itself. More experienced users will be able to browse the information for specific topics of interest.Goals for Part II–IV

Parts II–IV of this book are geared toward individuals who have been assigned the task of administering an Exchange 2003 Server. The most common administrative tasks are detailed in the lessons in these sections.

These sections apply to individuals who are given full Exchange administrative rights, because most of the procedures described require those rights. The procedures are meant to be a guide through configuration and administrative tasks and other performance, optimization, and disaster-recovery techniques.

Although meant to be read sequentially, the lessons can be referenced individually because most of the lessons are independent of others and require minimal prerequisite steps from earlier lessons. Because of this, the lessons in this portion of the book can be used as a quick reference guide by administrators looking to perform a specific task.Conventions Used in This Book

This book uses different typefaces to differentiate between code and regular English, and also to help you identify important concepts.

Text that you type and text that should appear on your screen is presented in monospace type.

It will look like this to mimic the way text looks on your screen.

Placeholders for variables and expressions appear in monospace italic font. You should replace the placeholder with the specific value it represents.

This arrow (¬) at the beginning of a line of code means that a single line of code is too long to fit on the printed page. Continue typing all the characters after the ¬ as though they were part of the preceding line.

Note - A note represents interesting pieces of information relevant to the surrounding discussion.

Tip - A tip offers advice or teaches you an easier way to do a task or procedure.

Caution - A caution advises you about potential issues to avoid or take into account.

Headlined sidebars provide additional information and examples in more detail.


© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

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Table of Contents

Introduction.

Who Is This Book For?

How Is This Book Organized?

Goals for Part I

Goals for Part II-IV

Conventions Used in This Book

I. EXCHANGE SERVER 2003 OVERVIEW.

1. Introducing Exchange Server 2003.

New Features

Improved Administration, Deployment, and Management Tools

Updated Outlook Web Access

Updated VSAPI

Enhanced Reliability, Backup, and Recovery via Volume Shadow Copy Service and Mailbox Recovery Center

Exchange Server 2003 Enterprise Specific Features

Messaging, Collaboration, and Presence in the Enterprise

Choosing an Edition

Exchange Server 2003 Standard

Exchange Server 2003 Enterprise

Installation Prerequisites

Network Requirements

Hardware

Network Operating System Requirements

Features No Longer Supported

Chat, Instant Messaging, Conferencing

M: Drive

MAPI, MAPI Common Message Calls

Legacy Connectors

Summary

2. Understanding Exchange 2003 and Active Directory.

Why Active Directory?

Active Directory Advantages

Requirements for Exchange Server 2003

Why Windows Server 2003?

Server Reliability

Remote Access

Server Clustering

Understanding Front-End Servers

Typical Scenarios for Front-End Servers

Understanding Back-End Servers

Typical Scenarios for Back-End Servers

Summary

II. EXCHANGE SERVER 2003 ADMINISTRATION CONFIGURATION AND ADMINISTRATION.

3. Managing Users, Contacts, and Groups.

Administering Active Directory

Managing Users with Active Directory

Managing Contacts

Working with Security and Distribution Groups

Group Types and Scopes

Creating Security or Distribution Groups

Creating Query-Based Distribution Groups

Renaming and Deleting Groups

Summary

4. Managing Exchange Server 2003 via Exchange System Manager.

What Is Exchange System Manager (ESM)?

Installing the ESM

Backward Compatibility with ESM

Creating Mailbox Data Stores

Creating Public Folder Data Stores

Summary

5. Managing Mailboxes and Address Lists.

Understanding Mailbox Administration

Managing Mailboxes

Removing Mailboxes from User Accounts

Viewing Mailbox Size and Message Counts

Setting Mailbox Restrictions

Managing Address Lists

Setting Up New Address Lists

Working with Address Book Templates

Managing Offline Address Lists

Summary

6. Managing Administrative Groups and Routing Groups.

Working with Administrative Groups

Displaying Administrative Groups

Switching Operational Modes

Adding Administrative Groups

Moving and Copying Objects Between Groups

Renaming and Deleting Administrative Groups

Working with Routing Groups

Enabling and Creating Routing Groups

Moving Servers Between Routing Groups

Renaming and Deleting Routing Groups

Configuring the X.400 Message Transfer Agent (MTA) and Parameters

Configuring X.400 Connectors

Creating a TCP/IP X.400 Stack

Creating an X.400 Connector

Configuring Routing Group Connectors

Configuring SMTP Connectors

Managing Connectors

Enabling Content Restrictions

Enabling Delivery Restrictions

Disabling Connectors

Summary

7. Using and Managing Public Folders.

Using and Accessing Public Folders

Verifying HTTP Virtual Server Settings

Accessing Public Folders Through the Exchange Information Store

Managing Public Folders

Creating Public Folder Containers and Trees

Creating Public Folders with Exchange System Manager

Creating Public Folders in Outlook

Creating Public Folders Using Internet Explorer

Adding Items to Public Folders Using Exchange System Manager

Adding Items to Public Folders Using Internet Explorer and Outlook

Manipulating Public Folders

Delegating Administrative Permissions

Managing Public Folder Replication

Configuring Public Folder Replication Settings

Removing Public Folder Replicas

Viewing Replication Status

Summary

8. Configuring and Managing Virtual Servers.

Working with Virtual Servers

Managing Virtual Servers

Administering POP3 Virtual Servers

Administering SMTP Virtual Servers

Creating SMTP Virtual Servers

Configuring Incoming Connections

Administering IMAP4 Virtual Servers

Administering HTTP Virtual Servers

Summary

9. Securing Exchange with Policies and Permissions.

Managing Policies

Managing Recipient Policies

Managing System Policies

Managing Permissions

Setting Permissions

Delegating Permissions

Securing Groups

Using Microsoft Baseline Security Analyzer

Summary

III. EXCHANGE SERVER EMAIL CLIENTS: OWA, OMA, AND OUTLOOK.

10. Managing Outlook Web Access (OWA) and Outlook Mobile Access (OMA).

Introducing OWA for Exchange Server 2003

Using OWA

Managing OWA

Introducing OMA for Exchange Server 2003

Setting Up OMA

Managing OMA

Summary

11. Managing and Using Microsoft Office Outlook 2003.

Introducing the New Features in Microsoft Office Outlook 2003

Configuring Outlook 2003

Initial Configuration: Setting Up Outlook to Connect to Exchange Server

Initial Configuration: Setting Up Outlook to Connect to Internet Mail or Other Server Types

Using Outlook 2003

Introducing RPC over HTTP for Outlook 2003

Configuring RPC over HTTP

Using Outlook 2003 via RPC over HTTP

Summary

IV. PERFORMANCE, OPTIMIZATION, AND DISASTER RECOVERY TECHNIQUES.

12. Performance Monitoring, Optimizing, and Troubleshooting.

Message Tracking and Logging

Tracking Messages

Logging Virtual Servers and Diagnostics Logging

Managing and Troubleshooting Message Queues

Monitoring Server Health and Performance

Using the Performance Console

Using Network Monitor

Using Task Manager

Monitoring Processor Usage

Monitoring Disk Subsystems

Troubleshooting Exchange Databases

Using ISINTEG

Using ESEUTIL

Summary

13. Backing Up Data Stores with the Windows Server 2003 Backup Utility.

Choosing the Proper Backup Regimen

Understanding the Basic Backup Types

Online and Offline Backups

Backup Types

Understanding Which Components to Back Up

Backing Up Mailbox Data Stores and Public Folder Stores

Backing Up Certificate Services

Backing Up Internet Information Services

Backing Up Active Directory: Users, Groups, and Contacts

Setting Up Recovery Storage Groups

Summary

14. Restoring Data Stores with the Windows Server 2003 Backup Utility.

Choosing Which Components to Restore

Restoring Mailboxes and Public Folders

Restoring Certificate Services

Restoring Internet Information Services

Restoring Active Directory: Users, Groups, and Contacts

Using Recovery Storage Groups

Summary

15. Exploring Exchange 2003 Tools, Resources, and Links.

Help! Where Can I Go?

Backup Tools

VERITAS Backup Exec

CommVault Galaxy Backup and Recovery

Antivirus Utilities

Sybari Antigen for Exchange

Symantec Mail Security for Microsoft Exchange

McAfee GroupShield for Microsoft Exchange

Panda Exchange Secure Antivirus

Trend Micro ScanMail for Microsoft Exchange

AntiSpam Utilities

iHateSpam Server Edition

Lyris MailShield

SpamArrest.com

Tapping into the Online Exchange Server Community

The Experts Exchange Website

The Slip Stick Website

The MS Exchange.org Website

The Microsoft Exchange Product Home Page

The Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 Support Center

The Exchange Server Developer Center

The Exchange Server TechCenter

The Microsoft Knowledge Base

Summary

Index.

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Preface

Introduction

The primary goal of this book is to provide Exchange 2003 users with a series of lessons that provide information and examples of the procedures that are most important to Exchange administrators and power users. Each lesson is designed to take about 10 minutes to read. The lessons are based on my experiences, in house and out in the field, supporting Exchange organizations of all sizes. Those experiences helped me determine what features and topics would be most useful to a broad audience. I also used feedback from end-user training participants and instructors of administrator training classes to further fine-tune the lessons.

Who Is This Book For?

This book targets three specific audiences:

  • End users—Entry-level individuals who have had limited or no exposure to Exchange 2003.
  • Power users—Users who have intermediate- to advanced-level knowledge of Exchange 2003.
  • Exchange administrators—Individuals who are tasked with daily administration and support of Exchange 2003.

In my experience, I have found that many individuals tasked to be Exchange Administrators lack significant technical expertise and training. The early lessons in the book will be helpful in getting them "up to speed." As readers become more familiar with Exchange 2003 features and functionality, the later lessons will help them in using more advanced features.

How Is This Book Organized?

The information and examples provided in this book apply to Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 with SP1. Prior versions of Exchange—Exchange 2000 and Exchange 5.x—are not covered in this book. Administrative procedures that require a workstation were performed with Windows XP SP1+ with Internet Explorer 6.0 and all available service packs. Although other operating systems and Internet browsers can be used for administration in some cases, they may provide results and functionality different from those explained in the pages of this book.

Goals for Part I

Part I of this book is written for users who are new to Exchange or need to refresh their knowledge of Exchange 2003 Server. The part introduces the reader to Exchange 2003 by providing information on new features, removed features, installation requirements, Active Directory, and more. Ideally, these lessons will be read in order by those new to Exchange, because the information builds on itself. More experienced users will be able to browse the information for specific topics of interest.

Goals for Part II–IV

Parts II–IV of this book are geared toward individuals who have been assigned the task of administering an Exchange 2003 Server. The most common administrative tasks are detailed in the lessons in these sections.

These sections apply to individuals who are given full Exchange administrative rights, because most of the procedures described require those rights. The procedures are meant to be a guide through configuration and administrative tasks and other performance, optimization, and disaster-recovery techniques.

Although meant to be read sequentially, the lessons can be referenced individually because most of the lessons are independent of others and require minimal prerequisite steps from earlier lessons. Because of this, the lessons in this portion of the book can be used as a quick reference guide by administrators looking to perform a specific task.

Conventions Used in This Book

This book uses different typefaces to differentiate between code and regular English, and also to help you identify important concepts.

Text that you type and text that should appear on your screen is presented in monospace type.

It will look like this to mimic the way text looks on your screen.

Placeholders for variables and expressions appear in monospace italic font. You should replace the placeholder with the specific value it represents.

This arrow (¬) at the beginning of a line of code means that a single line of code is too long to fit on the printed page. Continue typing all the characters after the ¬ as though they were part of the preceding line.


Note - A note represents interesting pieces of information relevant to the surrounding discussion.


Tip - A tip offers advice or teaches you an easier way to do a task or procedure.


Caution - A caution advises you about potential issues to avoid or take into account.



Headlined sidebars provide additional information and examples in more detail.


© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Read More Show Less

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