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Sams Teach Yourself Exchange Server 2003 in 10 Minutes
     

Sams Teach Yourself Exchange Server 2003 in 10 Minutes

by James Walker, Kenton Gardinier
 

In your daily maintenance routine of your company's Microsoft Exchange Server, you probably run into bumps along the way. Sams Teach Yourself Exchange Server 2003 in 10 Minutes is a great, quick-reference guide to the most common tasks you perform as an Exchange Server administrator. Use this guide as a basis for practical knowledge and solutions to problems

Overview

In your daily maintenance routine of your company's Microsoft Exchange Server, you probably run into bumps along the way. Sams Teach Yourself Exchange Server 2003 in 10 Minutes is a great, quick-reference guide to the most common tasks you perform as an Exchange Server administrator. Use this guide as a basis for practical knowledge and solutions to problems with managing mailboxes, performing database maintenance, Outlook Web access, performance optimization and group policy management. When all you need is a quick-hit of information so you can quickly get back to work, Sams Teach Yourself Exchange Server 2003 in 10 Minutes is your best option.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672327247
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
10/27/2005
Series:
Sams Teach Yourself Series
Pages:
240
Product dimensions:
5.50(w) x 8.10(h) x 0.60(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt

IntroductionIntroduction

The primary goal of this book is to provide Exchange 2003 users with a series of lessons that provide information and examples of the procedures that are most important to Exchange administrators and power users. Each lesson is designed to take about 10 minutes to read. The lessons are based on my experiences, in house and out in the field, supporting Exchange organizations of all sizes. Those experiences helped me determine what features and topics would be most useful to a broad audience. I also used feedback from end-user training participants and instructors of administrator training classes to further fine-tune the lessons.Who Is This Book For?

This book targets three specific audiences:

  • End users—Entry-level individuals who have had limited or no exposure to Exchange 2003.

  • Power users—Users who have intermediate- to advanced-level knowledge of Exchange 2003.

  • Exchange administrators—Individuals who are tasked with daily administration and support of Exchange 2003.

In my experience, I have found that many individuals tasked to be Exchange Administrators lack significant technical expertise and training. The early lessons in the book will be helpful in getting them "up to speed." As readers become more familiar with Exchange 2003 features and functionality, the later lessons will help them in using more advanced features.How Is This Book Organized?

The information and examples provided in this book apply to Microsoft Exchange Server 2003 with SP1. Prior versions of Exchange—Exchange 2000 and Exchange 5.x—are not covered in this book. Administrative proceduresthat require a workstation were performed with Windows XP SP1+ with Internet Explorer 6.0 and all available service packs. Although other operating systems and Internet browsers can be used for administration in some cases, they may provide results and functionality different from those explained in the pages of this book.Goals for Part I

Part I of this book is written for users who are new to Exchange or need to refresh their knowledge of Exchange 2003 Server. The part introduces the reader to Exchange 2003 by providing information on new features, removed features, installation requirements, Active Directory, and more. Ideally, these lessons will be read in order by those new to Exchange, because the information builds on itself. More experienced users will be able to browse the information for specific topics of interest.Goals for Part II–IV

Parts II–IV of this book are geared toward individuals who have been assigned the task of administering an Exchange 2003 Server. The most common administrative tasks are detailed in the lessons in these sections.

These sections apply to individuals who are given full Exchange administrative rights, because most of the procedures described require those rights. The procedures are meant to be a guide through configuration and administrative tasks and other performance, optimization, and disaster-recovery techniques.

Although meant to be read sequentially, the lessons can be referenced individually because most of the lessons are independent of others and require minimal prerequisite steps from earlier lessons. Because of this, the lessons in this portion of the book can be used as a quick reference guide by administrators looking to perform a specific task.Conventions Used in This Book

This book uses different typefaces to differentiate between code and regular English, and also to help you identify important concepts.

Text that you type and text that should appear on your screen is presented in monospace type.

It will look like this to mimic the way text looks on your screen.

Placeholders for variables and expressions appear in monospace italic font. You should replace the placeholder with the specific value it represents.

This arrow (¬) at the beginning of a line of code means that a single line of code is too long to fit on the printed page. Continue typing all the characters after the ¬ as though they were part of the preceding line.

Note - A note represents interesting pieces of information relevant to the surrounding discussion.

Tip - A tip offers advice or teaches you an easier way to do a task or procedure.

Caution - A caution advises you about potential issues to avoid or take into account.

Headlined sidebars provide additional information and examples in more detail.


© Copyright Pearson Education. All rights reserved.

Meet the Author

Dan Balter, MCSE, CNE, (Venice, CA) is the Chief Technology Officer for InfoTechnology Partners, Inc. and works as a successful, independent consultant and trainer for both corporate and government clients. He is certified as a Microsoft Systems Engineer (MCSE) and held the Novell NetWare Engineer (CNE) designation for several years. Dan has authored more than 250 computer-training videos on various Microsoft technologies (including Exchange and Windows Server) and has coauthored several well-received books.

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