Sams Teach Yourself iOS 5 Application Development in 24 Hours

( 7 )

Overview

In just 24 sessions of one hour each, learn how to build powerful applications for today’s hottest handheld devices: the iPhone and iPad! Using this book’s straightforward, step-by-step approach, you’ll master every skill and technology you need, from setting up your iOS development environment to building great user interfaces, sensing motion to writing multitasking applications. Each lesson builds on what you’ve already learned, giving you a rock-solid foundation for ...

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Overview

In just 24 sessions of one hour each, learn how to build powerful applications for today’s hottest handheld devices: the iPhone and iPad! Using this book’s straightforward, step-by-step approach, you’ll master every skill and technology you need, from setting up your iOS development environment to building great user interfaces, sensing motion to writing multitasking applications. Each lesson builds on what you’ve already learned, giving you a rock-solid foundation for real-world success!

Step-by-step instructions carefully walk you through the most common iOS development tasks.

Quizzes and Exercises at the end of each chapter help you test your knowledge.

By the Way notes present interesting information related to the discussion.

Did You Know? tips offer advice or show you easier ways to perform tasks.

Watch Out! cautions alert you to possible problems and give you advice on how to avoid them.

Printed in full color—figures and code appear as they do in Xcode

  • Covers iOS 5.0 and up
  • Learn to navigate the Xcode 4.2+ development environment
  • Prepare your system and iDevice for efficient development
  • Get started quickly with Apple’s Objective-C and Cocoa Touch
  • Understand the Model-View-Controller (MVC) development paradigm
  • Visually design and code interfaces using Xcode Storyboards, Segues, and the iOS Object Library
  • Build advanced UIs with Tables, Split Views, Navigation Controllers, and more
  • Read and write preferences and data, and create System Settings plug-ins
  • Use the iOS media playback and recording capabilities
  • Take photos and manipulate graphics with Core Image
  • Sense motion, orientation, and location with the accelerometer, gyroscope, and GPS
  • Integrate online services using Twitter, Email, Web Views, and Google Maps
  • Create universal applications that run on both the iPhone and iPad
  • Write background-aware multitasking applications
  • Trace and debug your applications as they run

Covers iOS 5, Xcode 4.2+, Storyboards, iPhone, iPad, and More!

Additional files and updates available online

http://teachyourselfios.com

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780672335761
  • Publisher: Sams
  • Publication date: 1/13/2012
  • Series: Sams Teach Yourself Series
  • Edition number: 3
  • Pages: 785
  • Sales rank: 1,461,703
  • Product dimensions: 6.90 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 1.30 (d)

Meet the Author

John Ray is currently serving as a Senior Business Analyst and Development Team Manager for the Ohio State University Research Foundation. He has written numerous books for Macmillan/Sams/Que, including Using TCP/IP: Special Edition, Teach Yourself Dreamweaver MX in 21 Days, Mac OS X Unleashed, and Teach Yourself iPad Development in 24 Hours. As a Macintosh user since 1984, he strives to ensure that each project presents the Macintosh with the equality and depth it deserves. Even technical titles such as Using TCP/IP contain extensive information about the Macintosh and its applications and have garnered numerous positive reviews for their straightforward approach and accessibility to beginner and intermediate users.

You can visit his website at http://teachyourselfios.com or follow him on Twitter at #iOSIn24.

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Table of Contents

Introduction 1

Who Can Become an iOS Developer? 2

Who Should Use This Book? 2

What Is (and Isn’t) in This Book? 3

HOUR 1: Preparing Your System and iDevice for Development 5

Welcome to the iOS Platform. 5

Becoming an iOS Developer 9

Creating and Installing a Development Provisioning Profile 14

Running Your First iOS App. 19

Developer Technology Overview. 20

Further Exploration 22

Summary 23

Q&A 23

Workshop. 24

HOUR 2: Introduction to Xcode and the iOS Simulator 25

Using Xcode 25

Using the iOS Simulator 51

Further Exploration 56

Summary 57

Q&A 57

Workshop. 58

HOUR 3: Discovering Objective-C: The Language of Apple Platforms 59

Object-Oriented Programming and Objective-C 59

Exploring the Objective-C File Structure. 64

Objective-C Programming Basics 73

Memory Management and ARC. 83

Further Exploration 86

Summary 86

Q&A 87

Workshop. 88

HOUR 4: Inside Cocoa Touch 89

What Is Cocoa Touch? 89

Exploring the iOS Technology Layers 91

Tracing the iOS Application Life Cycle 97

Cocoa Fundamentals 99

Exploring the iOS Frameworks with Xcode 108

Further Exploration 113

Summary 113

Q&A 114

Workshop 114

HOUR 5: Exploring Xcode’s Interface Builder 117

Understanding Interface Builder 117

Creating User Interfaces 123

Customizing the Interface Appearance 129

Connecting to Code 133

Further Exploration 142

Summary 143

Q&A 144

Workshop 144

HOUR 6: Model-View-Controller Application Design 147

Understanding the Model-View-Controller Paradigm 147

How Xcode Implements MVC. 149

Using the Single View Application Template 154

Further Exploration 171

Summary 172

Q&A 172

Workshop 172

HOUR 7: Working with Text, Keyboards, and Buttons 175

Basic User Input and Output 175

Using Text Fields, Text Views, and Buttons 177

Further Exploration 200

Summary 201

Q&A 202

Workshop 202

HOUR 8: Handling Images, Animation, Sliders, and Steppers 205

User Input and Output 205

Creating and Managing Image Animations, Sliders, and Steppers 207

Further Exploration 227

Summary 228

Q&A 228

Workshop 229

HOUR 9: Using Advanced Interface Objects and Views 231

User Input and Output (Continued) 231

Using Switches, Segmented Controls, and Web Views 236

Using Scrolling Views 252

Further Exploration 258

Summary 259

Q&A 259

Workshop 260

HOUR 10: Getting the User’s Attention 261

Alerting the User 261

Exploring User Alert Methods. 271

Further Exploration 288

Summary 289

Q&A 289

Workshop 290

HOUR 11: Implementing Multiple Scenes and Popovers 291

Introducing Multiscene Storyboards 292

Understanding the iPad Popover. 309

Using a Modal Segue 319

Using a Popover. 328

Further Exploration 334

Summary 335

Q&A 335

Workshop 336

HOUR 12: Making Choices with Toolbars and Pickers 337

Understanding the Role of Toolbars. 337

Exploring Pickers 341

Using the Date Picker 349

Using a Custom Picker 364

Further Exploration 380

Summary 381

Q&A 381

Workshop 382

HOUR 13: Advanced Storyboards Using Navigation and Tab Bar Controllers 385

Advanced View Controllers 386

Exploring Navigation Controllers 388

Understanding Tab Bar Controllers 393

Using a Navigation Controller 398

Using a Tab Bar Controller 407

Further Exploration 417

Summary 417

Q&A 418

Workshop 419

HOUR 14: Navigating Information Using Table Views and Split View Controllers 421

Understanding Tables 422

Exploring the Split View Controller (iPad Only). 430

A Simple Table View Application 433

Creating a Master-Detail Application 443

Further Exploration 460

Summary 460

Q&A 461

Workshop 461

HOUR 15: Reading and Writing Application Data 463

iOS Applications and Data Storage 463

Data Storage Approaches 465

Creating Implicit Preferences 473

Implementing System Settings 479

Implementing File System Storage 492

Further Exploration 500

Summary 501

Q&A 501

Workshop 502

HOUR 16: Building Rotatable and Resizable User Interfaces 503

Rotatable and Resizable Interfaces 503

Creating Rotatable and Resizable Interfaces with Interface Builder. 508

Reframing Controls on Rotation 513

Swapping Views on Rotation 521

Further Exploration 527

Summary 527

Q&A 528

Workshop 529

HOUR 17: Using Advanced Touches and Gestures 531

Multitouch Gesture Recognition 532

Using Gesture Recognizers 534

Further Exploration 553

Summary 554

Q&A 554

Workshop 554

HOUR 18: Sensing Orientation and Motion 557

Understanding Motion Hardware 558

Accessing Orientation and Motion Data 560

Sensing Orientation 564

Detecting Tilt and Rotation 568

Further Exploration 579

Summary 580

Workshop 581

HOUR 19: Working with Rich Media 583

Exploring Rich Media 583

The Media Playground Application. 598

Further Exploration 625

Summary 626

Q&A 627

Workshop 627

HOUR 20: Interacting with Other Applications 629

Extending Application Integration 629

Using Address Book, Email, Twitter, and Maps.. Oh My 641

Further Exploration 658

Summary 659

Q&A 659

Workshop 660

HOUR 21: Implementing Location Services 661

Understanding Core Location. 661

Creating a Location-Aware Application 668

Using the Magnetic Compass 678

Further Exploration 686

Summary 687

Q&A 687

Workshop 688

HOUR 22: Building Background-Aware Applications 691

Understanding iOS Backgrounding 692

Disabling Backgrounding 696

Handling Background Suspension. 697

Implementing Local Notifications 698

Using Task-Specific Background Processing 701

Completing a Long-Running Background Task 708

Further Exploration 714

Summary 715

Q&A 715

Workshop 716

HOUR 23: Building Universal Applications 717

Universal Application Development 717

Creating a Universal Application (Take 1) 722

Creating a Universal Application (Take 2) 726

Using Multiple Targets 730

Further Exploration 732

Summary 733

Q&A 733

Workshop 734

HOUR 24: Application Tracing and Debugging 735

Instant Feedback with NSLog 736

Using the Xcode Debugger. 738

Further Exploration 752

Summary 753

Q&A 753

Workshop 753

Index 755

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 7 Customer Reviews
  • Posted July 17, 2012

    More busy than informative

    This book strives to get you past the many tools available to developers in setting up an iPhone app. It is a big job. In the past I've seen other authors tackle similar large (and visually oriented) jobs. For example, I've developed VBA applications for MS Office products and have a pile of books similar to this one on how to set up forms and gather data from Word documents or Access databases. A common peril is for the author to become so entangled in the "drag-this-here, write-that-there" that the reasons for wanting to perform the drill are lost. This book is so severely bound up in these tangles that it is hardly worth while. For example, the screen in the iPhone is pretty small. Often you need to split up your app so that part of the user interaction is on one "View", and the remainder is on a second "View". (The term "View" is a technical one in iOS5). The author stresses that a key programming problem is how to make information in one View available to other views. There follows a brief high-level view of the solutions (there are several ways to approach the topic) followed by long and extremely detailed examples of how this is done in hours 11 and 12. However, if you are not very much on your toes during these exercises it is extremely easy to get to the end of the third detailed example and have no idea of exactly what the solution to information sharing really is. It would be nice if there were interruptions in the drag-this-here, code-that-there routine to point out which of the solutions were implemented and exactly how they function. As others have discussed, there is little focus on Objective C, as such. So if you are learning Xcode (the integrated programming environment and debugger), the Interface Builder (which allows you to visually set up Views) and Objective C then it can be a daunting challenge to "learn what it is that you were supposed to learn". I don't know of a better book, but I would not generally recommend this one for new iPhone developers.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 1, 2012

    Good introduction to apps but not very useful for someone who do

    Good introduction to apps but not very useful for someone who doesn't know Objective C. Very difficult to develop new app with information from this book alone.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 25, 2010

    The ebook stinks. The print book is great.

    The ebook is NOT a pdf. It's an encrypted pdb file that can only be opened with Nook. When you open the ebook it's just imperfect text floating around the images of the page you're on. The print book is thoughtfully laid out and is much more readable and therefore understandable. I was hoping for just a pdf like a Manning press ebook that is just pictures of each page, in color. Not so.

    Anyway, since this review is associated with the book in general, I can't fault the book for one terrible delivery mechanism. Really, the content of the book (in printed format) is dynamite. It covers a ton and is very understandable. My thanks to John and Sean.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2010

    Good introduction.

    Covers a lot of ground and introduces the concepts of iphone development gently and pretty clearly

    My only gripe is with the online version of the book which I purchased because of instant delivery and it was a LOT cheaper. The electronic version has terrible typesetting errors. The code snapshots don't appear in the book where they are supposed to and many times they appear a few pages behind where they are introduced in the book. OUCH. Someone didn't QA this reader product very well.

    Second comment is that whoever is the editor obviously didn't read the book in depth. There are a LOT of typos, which normally wouldn't be a problem if you're just spelling the words of a story wrong but when you are typing classnames wrong it can be a little frustrating for a beginner. Luckily I learned about 8 chapters in not to trust any of the classnames discussed in the narrative at all. For example: On page 600 the author refers to classname PSTitleSpecifier when the proper name is actually PSTitleValueSpecifier! If you build with the author's instructions your code often doesn't work. Luckily the included code usually works so you can refer to that. Just be warned, there was no editor for the narrative apparently.

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