Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 in 10 Minutes

Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 in 10 Minutes

by Faithe Wempen
     
 

Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 in 10 Minutes is authored by a person in the field familiar about how and what actual users need to know about PowerPoint. This book has the essential coverage of the most common tasks and features used in PowerPoint. You may save time by completing the 10-minute lessons on the most used features. The perfect down and

Overview

Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 in 10 Minutes is authored by a person in the field familiar about how and what actual users need to know about PowerPoint. This book has the essential coverage of the most common tasks and features used in PowerPoint. You may save time by completing the 10-minute lessons on the most used features. The perfect down and dirty little tutorial to get up and running with PowerPoint quickly.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672314407
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
05/06/1999
Series:
Sams Teach Yourself Series
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
5.47(w) x 8.45(h) x 0.50(d)

Read an Excerpt

Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 in 10 Minutes - Lesson 3 - Getting Around in PowerPoint

[Figures are not included in this sample chapter]

Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft PowerPoint 2000 in 10 Minutes
- 3 -
Getting Around in PowerPoint

In this lesson, you learn about the PowerPoint application and presentationwindows and how to enter commands with shortcut menus and toolbars.

A LOOK AT POWERPOINT'S APPLICATION WINDOW

Now that you have some sort of presentation started, let's take a look at thePowerPoint window. Your presentation appears in the center, of course, and all aroundit are tools that help you issue commands and perform modifications to it.

Some of the controls are standard Windows ones, such as the title bar, the windowcontrol buttons (Minimize, Maximize, and Close), and the menu system. In addition,you see some toolbars and several other items that are unique to PowerPoint. Youlearn about these screen elements in this lesson and in upcoming ones.

WORKING WITH MENUS

You are probably already familiar with menus. To open a menu, click its name onthe menu bar, and then click the command you want to issue.

However, in Office 2000 programs like PowerPoint, the menus have a special feature.When you open a menu, the entire menu does not display right away; only a selectlist of commands appears. If you pause a moment, or click the down-pointing arrowat the bottom of the menu, the entire menu unfurls, showing the remaining commands.This is called an adaptive menu because it adapts to the way you use the program.For example, in Figure 3.1, the menu on the left is the one that opens initially,and the one on the right is the full version that opens a few seconds later.

FIGURE 3.1  The most common or recently used commands appear first (left), and then the full menu a few seconds later (right).


Which Comes First?  A core set of essential commands always appears on the initial menu. In addition, any command that you have recently used also appears first. That way, over time, PowerPoint "learns" which commands you use most often, and displays them first.

Because a menu's commands vary depending on what actions you have taken, the figuresin this book show the menus with the personalized feature turned off. To turn thisfeature off yourself, open the Tools menu and choose Customize. Then on the Optionstab, deselect the Menus show recently used commands first check box. (This is thesame dialog box you use later in this lesson, in the section "Separating theStandard and Formatting Toolbars.")

WORKING WITH TOOLBARS

A toolbar is a collection of buttons that enables you to bypass the menusystem. For example, instead of selecting File, Save (opening the File menu and selectingSave), you can click the Save toolbar button to save your work. You learn more abouttoolbars later in this lesson.

Power Point displays three toolbars in Normal view: the Standard and Formattingtoolbars below the menu bar and the Drawing toolbar at the bottom of the screen.In other views, or while certain features are active, you may see additional toolbars.

To select a button from the toolbar, just click the button.

By default in PowerPoint 2000, the Standard and Formatting toolbars appear onthe same line, and most of the buttons on the Standard toolbar are not visible. Toview the undisplayed buttons, you must click the >> button at the rightend of that toolbar to open a pop-up list of them, as shown in Figure 3.2.

FIGURE 3.2  When both toolbars share a line, most of the tools on the Standard toolbar are hidden until you pop them up.

SEPARATING THE STANDARD AND FORMATTING TOOLBARS

Many people prefer to have each toolbar on a separate line, as was the defaultin earlier versions of PowerPoint. To do so, follow these steps:

1. Open the Tools menu and choose Customize. The Customize dialog box appears.

2. Click the Options tab.

3. Click to remove the check mark in the Standard and Formatting toolbars share one row check box.

4. Click Close. The toolbars appear on separate rows.

The remainder of the figures in this book use this two-row toolbar configurationbecause you can see the tools being referenced more easily.

LEARNING MORE ABOUT A TOOLBAR BUTTON

To see the name of a button, move the mouse pointer over the button. PowerPointdisplays a ScreenTip that provide s the name of the button.

To learn more about a button, press Shift+F1 or select Help, What's This? andthen click the button for which you want more information.

TURNING TOOLBARS ON OR OFF

If you never use a particular toolbar, you can turn it off to free up some screenspace. In addition, you can turn on other toolbars that come with PowerPoint butdon't appear automatically. To turn a toolbar on or off, do the following:

1. Right-click any toolbar. A shortcut menu appears (see Figure 3.3). A check mark appears beside each toolbar that is turned on.

2. Click the displayed toolbar you want to hide, or click a hidden toolbar that you want to display. Check marks appear beside displayed toolbars.

FIGURE 3.3  The shortcut menu for toolbars displays the names of all the toolbars.

When you click a toolbar name on the menu, the menu disappears and that toolbarappears (if it was hidden) or the toolbar disappears (if it was displayed).

USING SHORTCUT MENUS

Although you can enter all commands in PowerPoint using menus, PowerPoint offersa quicker way: context-sensitive shortcut menus like the ones in Windows. To usea shortcut menu, move the mouse pointer over the object you want the command to acton, and then click the right mouse button. A shortcut menu pops up, just as it didfor the toolbars in Figure 3.3, offering commands that pertain to the selected object.Click the desired command. For example, Figure 3.4 shows the menu you get when youright-click some text on a slide.

FIGURE 3.4 &n bsp;Display a shortcut menu by right-clicking the object.

WORKING WITH THE PRESENTATION WINDOW

In the center of the PowerPoint window is your presentation. Its window containsone or more panes, depending on the view in use. Figure 3.5 shows Normal view, whichcontains three panes: Outline, Slide, and Notes. You learn more about this and otherviews in Lesson 5, "Working with Slides in Different Views."

FIGURE 3.5  The Normal view of the presentation shows the Outline, Slide, and Notes panes.


Turning Off the Office Assistant  The Office Assistant (by default it's Clippit, the paperclip) provides help as you work. If you don't want the Office Assistant onscreen all the time, you can easily make it disappear. Right-click it and choose Hide. To make it reappear, select Help, Show the Office Assistant. You learn more about the Office Assistant in Lesson 4, "Getting Help."

As you learn in Lesson 5, you can edit the presentation's text either in the Outlineor the Slide pane. Changes in one pane affect the other. If you want to place a non-textobject on a slide (such as a graphic), you do so in the Slide pane. The Notes paneprovides a space for entering your own notes, which will not be visible to your audience.

In this lesson, you learned about the PowerPoint application and presentationwindows, and you learned how to enter commands with shortcut menus and toolbars.In the next lesson, you learn how to use the PowerPoint Help system.

Meet the Author

Faithe Wempen, owns a computer training and troubleshooting business in Indianapolis that specializes in helping beginning users with their PCs. Faithe has written over 20 computer books including, Microsoft Office 6-in-1, Learn Word 97 in a Weekend and Using Microsoft Home Essentials 98.

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