Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft Word 2000 in 24 Hours

Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft Word 2000 in 24 Hours

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by Heidi Steele
     
 

Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft Word 2000 in 24 Hours delivers on the premise that you can become fully versed in the application in 24 easy, one-hour lessons. The book not only explains all of the skills and concepts in the context of real work situations, but also how to apply them to real-word documents. Additionally, the book highlights the little details that

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Overview

Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft Word 2000 in 24 Hours delivers on the premise that you can become fully versed in the application in 24 easy, one-hour lessons. The book not only explains all of the skills and concepts in the context of real work situations, but also how to apply them to real-word documents. Additionally, the book highlights the little details that frustrate users at all levels as they try to be productive. Also included are workarounds for new and current features that might work better on paper than in real life.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672314421
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
05/07/1999
Series:
Sams Teach Yourself Series
Pages:
456
Product dimensions:
7.40(w) x 9.08(h) x 1.05(d)

Read an Excerpt

Teach Yourself Microsoft® Word 2000 in 24 Hours - Chapter 17 - Inserting Graphics, Drawing Shapes, and Creating Text Effects with WordArt

[Figures are not included in this sample chapter]

Teach Yourself Microsoft® Word 2000 in 24 Hours
- 17 -
Inserting Graphics, Drawing Shapes, and Creating Text Effects with WordArt

One of the perks of using a powerful word processing program is that you get toput pictures in your documents. Graphics help break up the text, convey meaning,and grab the reader's attention. Plus they are just plain fun to work with. In thishour, you start by learning how to insert an image in your document. This could bea piece of clip art, a photograph or image that you've scanned, a drawing you createdin another program, or an image you found on the Web. You then learn how to drawshapes (this isn't as boring as it sounds) and use WordArt to create special effectswith text.

The highlights of this hour include

  • Inserting images from the Clip Gallery

  • Inserting images from other places

  • Inserting scanned images or digital photographs

  • Drawing shapes with the drawing tools

  • Dressing up your text with WordArt

Inserting Images

Word lets you insert images from a variety of sources. You can pull them fromthe Clip Gallery, or from any folder on your own computer or network. And if youhave a scanner or digital camera, you have the option to import images directly fromthe scanner or camera software into Word.

Inserting Images from the Clip Gallery

The Microsoft Office CD contains a Clip Gallery of stock clip art images you canuse in your documents. Although functional, they are nothing to write home about.However, you can also use the Clip Gallery as a jump-off point to browse a largergallery of clip art at Microsoft's Web site, and you can use it to catalog all theimages you gather from various sources, so you have them all in one place.

To Do: Insert Clip Art from the Clip Gallery

To insert a piece of clip art from the Clip Gallery, follow these steps:

1. Move the insertion point to the approximate place where you want to insert the graphic.

2. Place the Microsoft Office CD in your CD-ROM drive, and choose Insert, Picture, Clip Art to display the Insert ClipArt dialog box (see Figure 17.1). If the Drawing toolbar is displayed, you can click its Insert Clip Art button as well.

3. In the Pictures tab, scroll through the categories of images and click one that you want to browse.

4. To return to the list of categories, click the All Categories button. To move backward and forward among categories you've already browsed, click the Back and Forward buttons.

5. If you know what type of image you're looking for, type a descriptive word or two in the Search for Clips text box, and press Enter. Word displays the images that most closely match your keywords.

FIGURE 17.1 The Insert ClipArt dialog box lets you browse the images in the Clip Gallery and insert them into your document.

6. When you find an image that you want to use, click it.

7. A small toolbar appears above the image. Click the Insert Clip button (see Figure 17.2). (You can also right-click the image and click Insert in the context menu.)


FIGURE 17.2
Click the image that you want to insert, and then click the Insert Clip toolbar button.

8. Insert additional images if you like (you may have to drag the dialog box out of the way to see the images in your document), and then click the Close button in the upper-right corner of the Insert ClipArt dialog box.


TIP: If you like leaving the Insert ClipArt dialog box open as you work on your document, you might want to temporarily shrink it so that it covers less of the Word window. Click the Change to Small Window button. To return the dialog box to its full size, click the same button (now labeled Change to Full Window).

The graphic is inserted in your document (see Figure 17.3). Don't worry if theimage is not the right size. You'll learn how to resize it in the next hour. You'llalso learn how to use the Picture toolbar, which appears when you click the imageto select it.

FIGURE 17.3 After you've got the image in your document, you'll have to do a little tinkering to get its size, position, and appearance just right.

Searching for Clip Art Online

If you don't find a sui table clip-art image in the Insert ClipArt dialog box,you can click the Clips Online button at the top of the dialog box to connectto Microsoft's Clip Gallery Live Web site. After you click this button, you may seea message box telling you to click OK if you have access to the Web and want to browseadditional clips. And, depending on your Internet connection, you may also be promptedto connect. Word then launches your browser and takes you to the site.

The first Web page you'll see at the site is an end-user license agreement forusing the images at the site. Click the Accept button. You can then browse Microsoft'scollection of images and download them for free. This set of images is continuouslyupdated, so you might want to check back periodically to see what's new.

Importing Images to the Clip Gallery

You can use the Clip Gallery as a "binder" of sorts to collect all yourimages in one place. Word gives you three options for how you want to import an imageto the Clip Gallery:

  • Leave the image in its current location and copy it to the Clip Gallery. Use this option if you want to be able to access the image in its current folder on your computer or network.

  • Move the image to the Clip Gallery. You might choose this option if you are short on disk space. This option is not available if the image is on a network drive.

  • Leave the image in its current location and ask the Clip Gallery to retrieve it from that location when you issue the command to insert the image. Use this option if you frequently access the image in its current location, but want to be able to access it from the Clip Gallery once in a while.

To Do: Import an Image to the Clip Gallery

Follow these steps to add an image to the Clip Gallery:

1. Choose Insert, Picture, Clip Art to display the Insert ClipArt dialog box.

2. Click the Import Clips button at the top of the dialog box.

3. In the Add Clip to Clip Gallery dialog box, choose one of the three option buttons at the bottom of the dialog box.

4. Navigate to and select the image (see Figure 17.4), and click the Import button.


FIGURE 17.4
Select the image that you want to add to the Clip Gallery in the Add Clip to Clip Gallery dialog box.

5. The Clip Properties dialog box appears (see Figure 17.5). Type a short description of the image in the Description of This Clip text box. This description is used to label the image in the Clip Gallery.

FIGURE 17.5
Use the Description tab to enter a name to identify your image in the Clip Gallery.

6. Click the Categories tab, and mark the categories in which you want this image to appear (see Figure 17.6). To create a new category, click the New Category button, type the name of the category in the New Category dialog box, and click OK.

FIGURE 17.6
Use the Categories tab to categorize your image in the Clip Gallery.

7. Click the Keywords tab. You use this tab to enter the keywords that will pull up this image when you perform a search in the Clip Gallery. Click the New Keyword button, enter a keyword in the New Keyword dialog box, and c lick OK. Repeat this step if you want to add more keywords (see Figure 17.7).

FIGURE 17.7
Use the Keywords tab to enter keywords you can use to search for this image in the Clip Gallery.

8. Click OK in the Clip Properties dialog box.

The image now appears in the Clip Gallery. If you want to change any of the informationthat you entered in steps 5-7, right-click the image and choose Clip Properties inthe context menu. To remove the image from the Clip Gallery, right-click the imageand choose Delete.

Inserting Images from Other Locations

If the graphic that you want to use is not in the Clip Gallery, but is sittingin a folder on your computer or network, you can insert it in your document. Wordcan handle graphics files in all sorts of formats, including (but not limited to)BMP, EMF, EPS, PNG, GIF, JPG, PCX, PICT, PING, and WMF. (If these formats don't meananything to you, don't worry about it. Chances are, Word will be able to use yourgraphics file without a problem.)

To Do: Insert an Image from Another Location

If you want to insert a graphic from a folder on your hard disk or network insteadof from the Clip Gallery, follow these steps:

1. Move the insertion point to the approximate place where you want to place the image.

2. Choose Insert, Picture, From File. (Or, if the Picture toolbar is showing, click the Insert Picture toolbar button.)

3. In the Insert Picture dialog box, navigate to and select the desired graphics file (see Figure 17.8). You might want to display the Views list and choose Preview to displ ay a preview of the selected image in the right side of the dialog box.


FIGURE 17.8
Select the graphics file that you want to insert in the Insert Picture dialog box.


TIP: By default, Office 2000 creates a My Pictures subfolder of My Documents to give you a handy place to store images. The Insert Picture dialog box automatically points to this folder, but you can navigate to any other folder that you like.
4. Click the Insert button to insert the image in your document.

Inserting Scanned Images and Digital Photographs

Word knows how to "talk" to the software that manages scanners and digitalcameras. If you have one of these gadgets (they are known as TWAIN devices), youcan easily insert a scanned image or digital photograph into your Word document,without first saving it as a separate graphics file on disk.

To Do: Insert a Scanned Image or Digital Photograph

To insert a scanned image or digital photograph from the scanner or camera, followthese steps:

1. Choose Insert, Picture, From Scanner or Camera.


NOTE: If you don't have a scanner or digital camera, don't even bother with these steps. If you try to issue this command, Word displays a message telling you that it can't find any TWAIN devices connected to your computer.
2. In the Insert Picture from Scanner or Camera dialog box (see Figure 17.9), select the camera or scanner that you want to use in the Device list.

FIGURE 17.9
If you have m ore than one TWAIN device, select the one you want to use.

3. Depending on the software that runs your scanner or camera, the Insert button and the associated Web Quality and Print Quality option buttons may be active or dim. If they're active, the software knows how to send an image to Word with no more participation from you after this dialog box. Select Web Quality (poorer) or Print Quality (better), click the Insert button, and wait for the image to appear in your document. If these buttons are dim, as they are in Figure 17.9, continue with the next two steps.

4. Click the Custom Insert button to launch the software you use for your scanner or camera.

5. Issue the command to scan the image or import it from the camera. Figure 17.10 shows the main program window for software that runs a scanner. Unless you're using the exact same software program (PaperPort), your window will look different.


FIGURE 17.10
Use the software that manages your TWAIN device to scan or import the image.

After a moment, the image appears in your document (see Figure 17.11).

FIGURE 17.11 The image appears in your document as soon as it's scanned or imported.

Deleting Images

To delete an image, click it to select it and then press the Delete key. Whenan image is selected, small squares (called selection handles) appear aroundits edges. Depending on the situation, the squares are either black, as they arein Figure 7.12, or white. (You'll learn more about this in the next hour.)

FIGURE 17.12 To delete an image, select it and then press Delete.

Drawing Shapes

Sometimes you don't need a complex graphic in your document--you just need somethingsimple, such as an arrow or a box. Word's Drawing toolbar lets you quickly draw allmanner of arrows, rectangles, ovals, callouts, banners, and so on. (You can alsocreate text boxes, which are discussed at the end of this section.) Figure 17.13shows one example of a drawing you can create with Word's drawing tools. After youhave inserted a drawing object, you can modify the image in a variety of ways, asyou'll see in the next hour.

FIGURE 17.13 This floorplan is a simple example of what you can create with Word's drawing tools.

To Do: Draw a Shape

1. Click the Drawing button on the Standard toolbar.

2. The Drawing toolbar appears docked at the bottom of the Word window by default. In Figure 17.14, it has been moved and is floating over the Word window.

FIGURE 17.14 Click the Drawing button on the Standard toolbar to display the Drawing toolbar.

3. Click the drawing tool that you want to use. The tools for basic shapes (lines, arrows, boxes, and so on) are available directly on the toolbar. If you want a more unusual shape, click the AutoShapes button, point to the category that you want to use, and click the shape in the submenu. In Figure 17.14, the Stars and Banners submenu is displayed.

4. Point with the crosshair mouse pointer to the upper-left corner of the area where want to draw the shap e, and drag diagonally down and to the right (see Figure 17.15).


FIGURE 17.15
Drag to create the shape.

5. Release the mouse button to finish drawing the shape.


TIP: If you plan on drawing several objects using the same tool (for example, you want to draw several lines), double-click the button in step 3. It will stay turned on as long as you want to use it. When you're finished, click it again to turn it off. (This does not work for the tools in the AutoShapes menu.)


TIP: If you are using the Rectangle tool and want to draw a perfect square, hold down the Shift key as you drag. This also works with the Oval tool to get a perfect circle, the Star tool to get a perfectly proportioned star, and so on.

To delete a drawing object, click it. It will gain small white squares (selectionhandles). (If it doesn't, click the Select Objects button in the Drawing toolbarand then click the object again.) Then press the Delete key.

One drawing object that deserves special attention is the text box. The Text Boxtool on the Drawing toolbar lets you draw a rectangular box in which you can typetext. Putting text in a text box gives you control over the position of the textin your document because you can drag the text box around just as you do other drawingobjects (see the next hour). In Figure 17.13 earlier in this hour, the text labelsin the diagram were all created with text boxes. (Their borders were removed, andthey were placed on top of other drawing objects.)

To create a text box, click the Text Box tool, drag to create a rectangle of aboutthe right size, and then release the mouse button. An insertion point appears inthe box to let you type text (see Figure 17.16).

FIGURE 17.16 When a text box is selected, an insertion point appears in it to let you type.

After you've typed your text, you can apply all the usual font and paragraph formattingto it. In addition, you can format the box itself, adjusting the appearance of theborders, changing the fill color, and so on. (You'll learn these techniques in thenext hour.)


TIP: In addition to creating text boxes with the Text Box tool, you can type text into any drawing object (with the exception of lines and arrows) by right-clicking it and choosing Add Text in the context menu. An insertion point appears in the object. Type the text as you would in a text box.

Creating Special Effects with WordArt

When you add graphics to a document, you aren't limited to working withimages separate from your text. WordArt lets you add flair to your text itself. It'sperfect for creating splashy headings and titles. You start with a basic "look"for your word or phrase, and then tweak it to get the exact effect you want. Afteryou've added a WordArt image, you can resize it, add borders, and so on (see thenext hour). Figure 17.17 shows a heading created with WordArt.

FIGURE 17.17 You can create a variety of effects with WordArt.

To Do: Create WordArt

To create a WordArt image, follow these steps:

1. Click where you want the WordArt image to go.

2. Choose Insert, Pict ure, WordArt. (If your Drawing toolbar is displayed, you can also click the Insert WordArt button on this toolbar.)

3. The WordArt Gallery dialog box opens (see Figure 17.18). Click the look that you want to start with, and click the OK button.

FIGURE 17.18 Choose the WordArt style that most closely matches what you want.

4. The Edit WordArt Text window appears.

5. Type the text for your WordArt image, replacing the Your Text Here dummy text (see Figure 17.19). Your text won't take on the look you chose in step 3 until it's inserted in the document.


FIGURE 17.19
Type the text that you want to use in the Edit WordArt Text window.

6. Use the Font and Size lists and the Bold and Italic buttons to make additional adjustments to the text.

7. Click the OK button.

The WordArt image appears in your document. To revise the WordArt text or changeits appearance after you've created the image, use the WordArt toolbar. This toolbarappears as soon as you insert a WordArt image. If you don't see it, choose View,Toolbars, WordArt. (You'll learn more about this in the next hour.)

Summary

You can insert existing images into your documents--via the Clip Gallery or fromanother location on your computer or network--or you can create new images with thedrawing tools or WordArt. After an image is in your document, you have to adjustits size, position, and relationship to the surrounding text, and otherwise alterits appearance. You'll learn how to make these kinds of changes in the next hour.

Q&A

Q Are there other places to find clip art on the Internet? I'm not enthralled with what I see at the Microsoft's Clip Gallery Live Web site.
A Yes. There are literally hundreds of sites on the Internet that offer free clip-art images. A good way to start looking is to visit Yahoo! (www.yahoo.com) and search for the keyword clip art.

Q I need to create several identical drawing objects. Do I have to draw each one separately?
A No. Draw the first one, click it to select it, and click the Copy button in the Standard toolbar (or press Ctrl+C). Then click the Paste button in the Standard toolbar (or press Ctrl+V) to paste a duplicate of the image. The copy appears on top of the original image. Continue with the next hour to learn how to move it to a new location.

Meet the Author

Heidi Steele is an experienced Microsoft Word consultant, trainer and author. She has taught beginner and expert users for numerous companies and organizations and trained hundreds of people to effectively use the software – from teachers and administrators to corporate executive assistants to online editors for publishing companies. Her clients have included the University of California at San Francisco and several Bay Area classroom training facilities. She is also an experienced technical editor and has reviewed several best selling Windows 98 and general computing titles. She has written, developed and tech edited more than 20 books on the Windows 95, Windows 98, Office, and the Internet.

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Sams Teach Yourself Microsoft Word 2000 in 24 Hours 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is a very good book for learning MS-Word 2000. This book is well written. I bought this book to prepare my resume' by making use of all the possible features that MS-Word offers. Now my resume' is a piece of art with graphics,tables,comments, symbols etc embedded in it. I strongly recommend this book for all who want to know more about MS-Word 2000.