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Sams Teach Yourself UNIX in 24 Hours / Edition 4
     

Sams Teach Yourself UNIX in 24 Hours / Edition 4

5.0 1
by Dave Taylor
 

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ISBN-10: 0672328143

ISBN-13: 9780672328145

Pub. Date: 08/26/2005

Publisher: Sams

If you're in need of a tutorial to learn UNIX from the ground up, this is it. Sams Teach Yourself UNIX in 24 Hours, Fourth Edition will let you experience UNIX through hands-on tutorials divided into 24 one-hour lessons so that you can learn the most common UNIX tasks at your own pace. The author will guide you through the basics of maintaining and

Overview

If you're in need of a tutorial to learn UNIX from the ground up, this is it. Sams Teach Yourself UNIX in 24 Hours, Fourth Edition will let you experience UNIX through hands-on tutorials divided into 24 one-hour lessons so that you can learn the most common UNIX tasks at your own pace. The author will guide you through the basics of maintaining and manipulating a UNIX/Linux operating system. This hands-on approach will allow you to work through the exercises and grasp common UNIX/Linux concepts, including:

  • Using the Command Line
  • Listing Files and Managing Disk Usage
  • Slicing and Dicing Command Pipe
  • Shell Programming
  • Printing in the UNIX Environment
  • Using telnet, ssh, and ftp
  • Perl Programming in UNIX
Gain the fundamental knowledge you need to begin working with UNIX with the help of Sams Teach Yourself UNIX in 24 Hours, Fourth Edition.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672328145
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
08/26/2005
Series:
Teach Yourself -- Hours Series
Edition description:
REV
Pages:
528
Product dimensions:
7.00(w) x 9.10(h) x 1.20(d)

Related Subjects

Table of Contents

Introduction.

Does Each Chapter Take an Hour?

What If I Take Longer Than 24 Hours?

Are There Really 24 Hours Worth of Lessons?

How to Use This Book

HOUR 1: What Is This Unix Stuff?

Goals for This Hour

What Is Unix?

A Brief History of Unix

What's All This About Multiuser Systems?

Cracking Open the Shell

Getting Help

HOUR 2: Getting onto the System and Using the Command Line.

Goals for This Hour

Beginning Your Session

Seeing What's Going On Around You

HOUR 3: Moving About the File System.

Goals for This Hour

What a Hierarchical File System Is All About

Directory Separator Characters

The Difference Between Relative and Absolute Filenames

HOUR 4: Listing Files and Managing Disk Usage.

Goals for This Hour

The ls Command

Special ls Command Flags

Permissions Strings

HOUR 5: Ownership and Permissions.

Goals for This Hour

Working with File Permissions

HOUR 6: Creating, Moving, Renaming, and Deleting Files and Directories.

Goals for This Hour

Manipulating the Unix File System

HOUR 7: Looking into Files.

Goals for This Hour

Looking Inside Files

HOUR 8: Filters, Pipes, and Wildcards!

Goals for This Hour

Maximizing the Command Line

HOUR 9: Slicing and Dicing Command-Pipe Data.

Goals for This Hour

The awk Programming System

How to Use cut in Pipes

Inline Editing with sed and tr

HOUR 10: An Introduction to the vi Editor.

Goals for This Hour

Editing the Unix Way

HOUR 11: Advanced vi Tricks, Tools, and Techniques.

Goals for This Hour

Advanced Editing with vi

Summary of vi Commands

HOUR 12: An Overview of the emacs Editor.

Goals for This Hour

The Other Popular Editor: emacs

HOUR 13: Introduction to Command Shells.

Goals for This Hour

The (Command) Shell Game

HOUR 14: Advanced Shell Interaction.

Goals for This Hour

Which Shell Is Which?

HOUR 15: Job Control.

Goals for This Hour

Wrestling with Your Jobs

HOUR 16: Shell Programming Overview.

Goals for This Hour

Build Your Own Commands

HOUR 17: Advanced Shell Programming.

Goals for This Hour

Searching a Database of Filenames with mylocate

HOUR 18: Printing in the Unix Environment.

Goals for This Hour

Making a Printed Copy

HOUR 19: Archives and Backups.

Goals for This Hour

The tar Tape Archive Utility

Shrinking Your Files with compress

Exploring the Unix Tape Command: cpio

Personal Backup Solutions

Working with Unix Package Managers

HOUR 20: Communicating with Email.

Goals for This Hour

Interacting with the World

HOUR 21: Using telnet, SSH, and ftp.

Goals for This Hour

Stepping Beyond Your Own System

HOUR 22: Searching for Information and Files.

Goals for This Hour

Finding What's Where

HOUR 23: Perl Programming in Unix.

Goals for This Hour

Flexible and Powerful: Perl

HOUR 24: GNOME and the GUI Environment.

Goals for This Hour

Tweaking Your Inner GNOME

Working with GNOME Applications

APPENDIX A: Common Unix Questions and Answers.

How do I use findxargs with filenames that contain spaces?

How do I find large files on my system?

How do I run a program on a schedule?

How do fix file permission problems?

How do I list files that don't match a given pattern?

How do I view lines X-Y in a text file?

How do I add a new directory to my PATH?

How do I recover deleted files?

How can I set my shell to protect me from accidental deletions?

What do the shell errors "arg list too long" and "broken pipe" mean?

Why use ssh instead of telnet? Or sftp instead of ftp?

APPENDIX B: Working with the Apache Web Server.

Goals for This Hour

Working with a Unix Web Server

Index.

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Sams Teach Yourself UNIX in 24 Hours 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Dave Taylor has managed to produce an excellent book for everyone who wants to get to grips with not just Unix strictly defined, but any operating system of the Unix family. For some time I have been trying to find a useful book to learn the essentials of using GNU/Linux. So many books fall into two categories: (1) books that assume you already know the basics of the system, and (2) books that patronisingly assume you are not really up to understanding the system, and try to fob you off with a watered down account. Here at last I have found a book which systematically works through all the main topic areas, covering the groundwork of each very clearly. The explanations are accompanied with useful examples to work through, all of which are there to give constructive practice, not just, as in some books, because they are supposed to make it more fun. That is not to say that I did not find the book enjoyable: I did, because learning a challenging subject clearly introduced is enjoyable, not because of gimmicky presentation. Dave Taylor tells you all the essentials of the Unix file system and how to find your way around it, use of the shell both from command-line and in scripts, use of Perl, editing with vi and emacs, communications and remote login, control of printers, archiving, and more. He also provides a brief introduction to desktop GUIs, particularly GNOME. In each of these areas there is of course much more to learn than can be given in one or two chapters of a book, but in each case I feel I have gained enough understanding to get going, and am in a position to move forward if I want to know more. My one small criticism is with the title. While it would no doubt be perfectly possible to read the book in 24 hours, it is totally unrealistic to imagine that anyone could really work through properly and absorb its content in 24 hours, unless of course you already know a good deal of the material. But frankly I would not want the book if it were otherwise: it would not be giving an adequate coverage of so large a field.