Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML 4 in 21 Days with CD-ROM, Professional Reference Edition, Second Edition

Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML 4 in 21 Days with CD-ROM, Professional Reference Edition, Second Edition

by Laura Lemay, Denise Tyler
     
 
Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML 4 in 21 Days, Professional Reference Edition is a completely revised version of the expanded, hardcover edition of the best-selling book that started the whole HTML/Web publishing phenomenon. The Professional Reference Edition of the book includes seven additional chapters covering Web page scripting, CGI and Perl, Java,

Overview

Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML 4 in 21 Days, Professional Reference Edition is a completely revised version of the expanded, hardcover edition of the best-selling book that started the whole HTML/Web publishing phenomenon. The Professional Reference Edition of the book includes seven additional chapters covering Web page scripting, CGI and Perl, Java, and Web server setup and administration, in addition to an expanded 250-page reference section.

Editorial Reviews

Booknews
A tutorial that covers the basics of HTML, tables, frames, JavaScript, CGI, Cascading Style Sheets, and other tools necessary for setting up Web sites and pages. The CD-ROM contains HTML authoring tools, Web site maintenance utilities, graphics creation and editing tools, and source code and examples from the text. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780672318382
Publisher:
Sams
Publication date:
02/23/2000
Series:
Sams Teach Yourself Series
Edition description:
Older Edition
Pages:
1191
Product dimensions:
7.72(w) x 9.46(h) x 2.64(d)

Related Subjects

Read an Excerpt


Day 2: Get Organized

Set Your Goals

What do you want people to be able to accomplish on your Web site? Are your readers looking for specific information on how to do something? Are they going to read through each page in turn, going on only when they're done with the page they're reading? Are they just going to start at your home page and wander aimlessly around, exploring your "world" until they get bored and go somewhere else?

Suppose that you're creating a Web site that describes the company where you work. Some people reading that Web site might want to know about job openings. Others might want to know where the company actually is located. Still others may have heard that your company makes technical white papers available over the Net, and they want to download the most recent version of a particular paper. Each of these goals is valid, so you should list each one.

For a shopping catalog Web site, you might have only a few goals: to enable your readers to browse the items you have for sale by name or by price, and to order specific items after they're done browsing.

For a personal or special-interest Web site, you may have only a single goal: to enable your readers to browse and explore the information you've provided.

The goals do not have to be lofty ("this Web site will bring about world peace") or even make much sense to anyone except you. Still, coming up with goals for your Web documents prepares you to design, organize, and write your Web pages specifically to reach these goals. Goals also help you resist the urge to obscure your content with extra information.

If you're designing Web pages for someone else-for example, if you're creating the Web site for your company or if you've been hired as a consultant-having a set of goals for the site from your employer definitely is one of the most important pieces of information you should have before you create a single page. The ideas you have for the Web site might not be the ideas that other people have for it, and you might end up doing a lot of work that has to be thrown away.

Break Up Your Content into Main Topics

With your goals in mind, now try to organize your content into main topics or sections, chunking related information together under a single topic. Sometimes the goals you came up with in the preceding section and your list of topics will be closely related. For example, if you're putting together a Web page for a bookstore, the goal of being able to order books fits nicely under a topic called, appropriately, "Ordering Books."

You don't have to be exact at this point in development. Your goal here is just to try to come up with an idea of what, specifically, you'll be describing in your Web pages. You can organize the information better later, as you write the actual pages.

Suppose that you're designing a Web site about how to tune up your car. This example is simple because tune-ups consist of a concrete set of steps that fit neatly into topic headings. In this example, your topics might include the following:

  • Change the oil and oil filter.
  • Check and adjust engine timing.
  • Check and adjust valve clearances.
  • Check and replace the spark plugs.
  • Check fluid levels, belts, and hoses.
Don't worry about the order of the steps or how you're going to get your readers to go from one section to another. Just list the points you want to describe in your Web site.

How about a less task-oriented example? Suppose that you want to create a set of Web pages about a particular rock band because you're a big fan, and you're sure other fans would benefit from your extensive knowledge. Your topics might be as follows:

  • The history of the band
  • Biographies of each of the band members
  • A "discography"-all the albums and singles the band has released
  • Selected lyrics
  • Images of album covers
  • Information about upcoming shows and future albums
You can come up with as many topics as you want, but try to keep each topic reasonably short. If a single topic seems too large, try to break it up into subtopics. If you have too many small topics, try to group them together into some sort of more general topic heading. For example, if you're creating an online encyclopedia of poisonous plants, having individual topics for each plant would be overkill. You can just as easily group each plant name under a letter of the alphabet (A, B, C, and so on) and use each letter as a topic. That's assuming, of course, that your readers will be looking up information in your encyclopedia alphabetically. If they want to look up poisonous plants by using some other method, you would have to come up with different topics.

Your goal is to have a set of topics that are roughly the same size and that group together related bits of information you have to present...

Meet the Author


Laura Lemay is a technical writer, author, Web addict, and motorcycle enthusiast. One of the world's most popular authors on Web development topics, she is the author of Sams Teach Yourself Web Publishing with HTML, Sams Teach Yourself Java in 21 Days, and Sams Teach Yourself Perl in 21 Days. You can visit her home page at http://www.lne.com/lemay/.

Denise Tyler is a freelance author, graphics artist, animator, and Web designer who resides in Madison, Wisconsin. She is the author of several FrontPage books in the Laura Lemay's Web Workshop series, the most recent being the best-selling Laura Lemay's Web Workshop: Microsoft FrontPage 98. She was also a contributing author for Tricks of the Game Programming Gurus, and author of Fractal Design Painter 3.1 Unleashed.

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