Sams Teach Yourself XML in 10 Minutes

Overview

XML is the de-facto standard for manipulating and sharing data among applications. It is supported by every major programming tool and language, including Java, Microsoft .NET, Oracle, SQL Server, etc. All professional developers and administrators - even those who don't intend to build XML applications - need a basic understanding of it just to read and maintain data they receive and process. Many of them don't have the time for a thick reference book or detailed tutorial. Sams Teach Yourself XML in 10 Minutes ...

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Overview

XML is the de-facto standard for manipulating and sharing data among applications. It is supported by every major programming tool and language, including Java, Microsoft .NET, Oracle, SQL Server, etc. All professional developers and administrators - even those who don't intend to build XML applications - need a basic understanding of it just to read and maintain data they receive and process. Many of them don't have the time for a thick reference book or detailed tutorial. Sams Teach Yourself XML in 10 Minutes quickly covers the basics of XML and its family of related concepts, including basic syntax, DTDs, XML Schema, DOM, SAX, XSL, and XPath. Each topic is illustrated with an example to ensure readers' understanding.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780672324710
  • Publisher: Sams
  • Publication date: 10/28/2002
  • Series: Sams Teach Yourself Series
  • Pages: 304
  • Sales rank: 1,392,553
  • Product dimensions: 5.44 (w) x 8.25 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Andrew Watt is an independent consultant and author with knowledge and interest in XML and graphics topics. He is the author of Designing SVG Web Graphics (New Riders, 2001) and XPath Essentials (John Wiley & Sons, 2002). He is a co-author of XML Schema Essentials (John Wiley & Sons, 2002), Sams Teach Yourself JavaScript in 21 Days (Sams, 2002), and SVG Unleashed (Sams, 2002). He is also a contributing author to Platinum Edition Using XHTML, XML, and Java 2 (Que, 2000), Professional XML, Second Edition (Wrox Press, 2001), Professional XSL (Wrox Press, 2001), Professional XML Meta Data (Wrox Press, 2001), and Special Edition Using XML, Second Edition (Que, 2002).

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Table of Contents

(NOTE: Each chapter concludes with a Summary.)

Introduction.

I. XML DOCUMENTS.

Lesson 1. What Is XML?

What Is XML For? XML Is a Markup Language. XML Is a Meta Language. How Does XML Relate to HTML? Separating Content from Presentation. How Is XML Written?

Lesson 2. The Structure of an XML Document.

An XML Document. Prolog. Document Type Declaration. Document Element. CDATA Sections. Content After the Document Element End Tag.

Lesson 3. XML Must Be Well-Formed.

Well-Formed XML Documents. XML Names. Elements. Attributes. Other Characteristics of Well-Formedness. Well-Formedness and XML Processor Type.

Lesson 4. Valid XML—Document Type Definitions.

Shared Documents: Why We Need DTDs. What Is a Valid XML Document? What a DTD Is. Declaring Elements in DTDs. Declaring Attributes in DTDs. Declaring Entities in the DTD.

Lesson 5. XML Entities.

What Is an Entity? Parsed Entities. Unparsed Entities.

Lesson 6. Characters in XML.

Internationalization. XML and Internationalization. Unicode. Fonts, Characters, and Glyphs.

Lesson 7. The Logic Hidden in XML.

Modeling Data As XML. W3C XML Data Models. XPath. The XML Information Set.

Lesson 8. Namespaces in XML.

What Is a Namespace, and Why Do You Need Them? Using Namespaces in XML. Using Multiple Namespaces in a Document.

II. MANIPULATING XML.

Lesson 9. The XML Path Language—XPath.

How XPath Is Used. Accessing Elements. Accessing Attributes. XPath Functions.

Lesson 10. XSLT—Creating HTML from XML.

XSLT Basics. Creating a Simple HTML Page. Creating an HTML List. Creating an HTML Table.

Lesson 11. XSLT—Transforming XML Structure.

Why Change Structure? Copying Elements. Creating New Elements. Creating New Attributes.

Lesson 12. XSLT—Sorting XML.

Conditional Processing and Sorting Data. Conditional Processing. The xsl:choose Element. Sorting Output. Multiple Sorts.

Lesson 13. Styling XML with CSS.

Cascading Style Sheets and XML. Associating a Stylesheet. Using CSS Rules with XML. Some Examples Using CSS Styling. Using CSS with XSLT.

Lesson 14. Linking in XML—XLink.

The XML Linking Language. XLink Attributes. XLink Examples. Document Fragments and Xpointer. XPointer and Xpath.

III. PROGRAMMING XML.

Lesson 15. Presenting XML Graphically—SVG.

What Is SVG? Advantages of SVG. Creating SVG. Some SVG Examples.

Lesson 16. The Document Object Model.

The Document Object Model. DOM Interfaces. DOM Interfaces Properties and Methods.

Lesson 17. The Document Object Model—2.

Creating a New Element. Retrieving Information from the DOM.

IV. WHERE XML IS GOING.

Lesson 18. SAX—The Simple API for XML.

What SAX Is and How It Differs from DOM. Basics of SAX Programming. Installing a SAX Parser. Simple SAX Example.

Lesson 19. Beyond DTDs—W3C XML Schema.

W3C XML Schema Basics. Declaring Elements. Defining Complex and Simple Types.

V. APPENDICES.

Appendix A. XML Online Resources.

Web Sites. Mailing Lists.

Appendix B. XML Tools.

XML Editors. XSLT Tools. XLink and XPointer Tools.

Appendix C. XML Glossary.

Index.

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