Samuel F. B. Morse: Patron of the Arts and Science

Samuel F. B. Morse: Patron of the Arts and Science

by Daniel Alef
     
 

Biographical profile of Samuel F. B. Morse, one of America's foremost painters and world-renowned inventor. A fresco in the U.S. Capitol building depicts three great American inventors, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Fulton, and Samuel F. B. Morse with Minerva, the goddess of the arts, apropos because Morse first became a famous American painter and sculptor with such… See more details below

Overview

Biographical profile of Samuel F. B. Morse, one of America's foremost painters and world-renowned inventor. A fresco in the U.S. Capitol building depicts three great American inventors, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Fulton, and Samuel F. B. Morse with Minerva, the goddess of the arts, apropos because Morse first became a famous American painter and sculptor with such works as Dying Hercules (Metropolitan Museum of Art collection) and the portrait of Marquis de Lafayette . Called the "American Leonardo" and the "Lightning Man," Morse went on to develop the first practical telegraphic system, a method of communication that quickly enveloped the United States and most of the globe, a revolutionary system that helped shrink the Earth. Award-winning author and syndicated columnist Daniel Alef, who has written more than 300 biographical profiles of America's greatest tycoons, brings out the story of Morse and his remarkable life of ups, downs and achievements. [1,293-word Titans of Fortune article]

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781608042081
Publisher:
Titans of Fortune Publishing
Publication date:
01/04/2010
Series:
Titans of Fortune
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
0 MB

Read an Excerpt

A fresco in the U.S. Capitol building depicts three great American inventors, Benjamin Franklin, Robert Fulton, and Samuel F. B. Morse with Minerva, the goddess of the arts. The stories of Fulton and Morse bear an uncanny resemblance to one another. Fulton conceived and built the first efficient and profitable steamboat, heralding a new age of transportation, while Morse developed the first efficient telegraph and established a new age of communication.
There is more. Fulton wanted to become a great painter and went to London to study under American Benjamin West, a painter to the court of George III, founder of the Royal Academy, and known in London as the "American Raphael." Morse did exactly the same thing. He, too, went to London to become a great painter, and with Benjamin West's help became a student at the Royal Academy. Although Morse achieved great acclaim as a painter, both men subsequently gave up painting and pursued their other passion, inventions, leaving an indelible mark on global history.
Samuel F. B. Morse was born in 1791 in Charlestown, Mass, the oldest son of Jedidiah, a pastor who wrote a series of geography textbooks that were second in popularity only to Noah Webster's spelling books and bible.

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