Samuel Morse: and the Story of the Telegraph (Uncharted, Unexplored and Unexplained Scientific Advancements of the 19th Century Series)

Samuel Morse: and the Story of the Telegraph (Uncharted, Unexplored and Unexplained Scientific Advancements of the 19th Century Series)

5.0 1
by Susan Zannos
     
 
Samuel Morse, who is called "the father of the telegraph," was not a scientist. For most of his life he was a struggling artist, and a good one. Although he had difficulty selling his paintings during his lifetime, he is now considered a major American painter, and his work is exhibited in art museums. In 1832, Morse was returning from Europe where he had been

Overview

Samuel Morse, who is called "the father of the telegraph," was not a scientist. For most of his life he was a struggling artist, and a good one. Although he had difficulty selling his paintings during his lifetime, he is now considered a major American painter, and his work is exhibited in art museums. In 1832, Morse was returning from Europe where he had been studying painting. On shipboard he heard another passenger talking about how electricity could travel through a wire in an instant. Morse had the idea that electricity could be used to send messages. If he had known how many scientists and inventors had already had the same idea, he might never have worked on developing a method of sending messages. But he didn't know, and his idea of creating a code out of dots and dashes, the Morse code, made the telegraph a practical method of sending messages through electric wires.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal - School Library Journal
Gr 4-8-The straightforward and somewhat dry narrative in each of these titles focuses on the individual's scientific accomplishments, with passing mention of his personal life. Full-page, "FYInfo" sidebars on related topics are included. For example, in Marconi they discuss electromagnetic waves, Morse code, and the transatlantic cable. Many of the books for further reading and Web sites are for older readers and adults. Average-quality color photos appear throughout, and the text font is not reader friendly. Nevertheless, the books have plenty of material to jump-start report writers, and the time lines are helpful in placing the scientists within the larger scientific picture of the day.-Deanna Romriell, Salt Lake City Library, UT Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781584152699
Publisher:
Mitchell Lane Publishers, Incorporated
Publication date:
09/01/2004
Series:
Uncharted, Unexplored and Unexplained Scientific Advancements of the 19th Century Series
Edition description:
Library Edition, Chapter Book
Pages:
48
Product dimensions:
6.78(w) x 9.30(h) x 0.33(d)
Age Range:
10 - 14 Years

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Samuel Morse: and the Story of the Telegraph (Uncharted, Unexplored and Unexplained Scientific Advancements of the 19th Century Series) 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago