SAMUEL RICHARDSON THE COMPLETE AND UNABRIDGED WORKS OF SAMUEL RICHARDSON [Worldwide Bestseller] Including PAMELA: Or, Virtue Rewarded; CLARISSA: Or the History of a Young Lady; THE HISTORY OF SIR CHARLES GRANDISON [Inspiration for Jane Austen] NOOKBook [NOOK Book]

Overview

COMPLETE & UNABRIDGED BESTSELLER: THE COMPLETE WORKS OF SAMUEL RICHARDSON
(Worldwide ...
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SAMUEL RICHARDSON THE COMPLETE AND UNABRIDGED WORKS OF SAMUEL RICHARDSON [Worldwide Bestseller] Including PAMELA: Or, Virtue Rewarded; CLARISSA: Or the History of a Young Lady; THE HISTORY OF SIR CHARLES GRANDISON [Inspiration for Jane Austen] NOOKBook

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Overview

COMPLETE & UNABRIDGED BESTSELLER: THE COMPLETE WORKS OF SAMUEL RICHARDSON
(Worldwide Bestseller)

Including Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded; Clarissa: Or the History of a Young Lady; The History of Sir Charles Grandison [Inspiration for Jane Austen]

NOOKBook

This bestselling volume contains the works of Samuel Richardson collected, for the very first time, in a single Nook edition. This volume contains such classics as Pamela, Clarissa and Sir Charles Grandison, as well a wealth of Samuel Richardson's lessor known works.


ABOUT PAMELA

Pamela, or Virtue Rewarded is an epistolary novel by Samuel Richardson, first published in 1740. It tells the story of a beautiful but poor 15-year old servant-maid named Pamela Andrews whose master, Mr. B, a nobleman, makes unwanted advances towards her after the death of his mother whose maid she was since the age of 12. Mr. B is infatuated with her, first by her looks and then her innocence and intelligence but his high rank hinders him from proposing marriage. He abducts her and locks her up in one of his estates and attempts to seduce and rape her. She rejects him continually refusing to be his mistress though she begins to realize that she is falling in love with him. He intercepts and reads her letters to her parents and becomes even more enamored by her innocence and intelligence and her continuous attempts to escape. Her virtue is eventually rewarded when he shows his sincerity by proposing an equitable marriage to her as his legal wife. In the second part of the novel, Pamela attempts to accommodate herself to upper-class society and to build a successful relationship with him. The story was a bestseller of its time and was very widely read, despite its perceived licentiousness.


ABOUT CLARISSA

Clarissa, or, the History of a Young Lady is an epistolary novel by Samuel Richardson, published in 1748. It tells the tragic story of a heroine whose quest for virtue is continually thwarted by her family, and is the longest real novel in the English language.

Clarissa Harlowe, the tragic heroine of Clarissa, is a beautiful and virtuous young lady whose family has become wealthy only in recent years and is now eager to become part of the aristocracy. Their original plan was to concentrate the wealth and lands of the Harlowes into the possession of Clarissa's brother James Harlowe, whose wealth and political power will lead to his being granted a title. Clarissa's grandfather leaves her a substantial piece of property upon his death and a new route to the nobility opens through Clarissa marrying Robert Lovelace, heir to an earldom. James's response is to provoke a duel with Lovelace, who thereafter is seen as an enemy to the family. James also proposes that Clarissa marry Roger Solmes, who is willing to trade properties with James to concentrate James's holdings and speed his becoming Lord Harlowe. The family agrees and attempts to force Clarissa to marry Solmes, whom she finds physically disgusting as well as boorish.

ABOUT THE HISTORY OF SIR CHARLES GODISON

The History of Sir Charles Grandison, commonly called Sir Charles Grandison, is an epistolary novel by Samuel Richardson first published in February 1753. The book was a response to Henry Fielding's The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, which parodied the morals presented in Richardson's previous novels. The novel follows the story of Harriet Byron who is pursued by Sir Hargrave Pollexfen. After she rejects Pollexfen, he kidnaps her, and she is only freed when Sir Charles Grandison comes to her rescue. After his appearance, the novel focuses on his history and life, and he becomes its central figure.

The novel incorporates an epistolary format similar to Richardson's previous novels, Clarissa and Pamela. Unlike those novels, Charles Grandison, the leading male character, is a morally good man and lacks the villainous intent that is manifested by the Lovelace or Mr. B (characters of Clarissa and Pamela respectively). Richardson was motivated to create such a male figure because of the prompting of his many female friends who wanted a counterpart to the virtues exhibited by Richardson's female characters.


EXCERPT FROM CLARISSA

"I am extremely concerned, my dearest friend, for the disturbance that have happened in your family. I know how it must hurt you to become the subject of the public talk: and yet, upon an occasion so generally known, it is impossible but that whatever relates to a young lady, whose distinguished merits have made her the public care, should engage every body's attention. I long to have the particulars from yourself; and of the usage I am told you receive upon an accident you could not help; and in which, as far as I can learn, the sufferer was the aggressor."
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Product Details

  • BN ID: 2940013060555
  • Publisher: The Complete Works Collection
  • Publication date: 12/11/2011
  • Series: The Complete Works Collection , #19
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Sales rank: 383,697
  • File size: 3 MB

Meet the Author

Samuel Richardson (19 August 1689 – 4 July 1761) was an 18th-century English writer and printer. He is best known for his three epistolary novels: Pamela: Or, Virtue Rewarded (1740), Clarissa: Or the History of a Young Lady (1748) and The History of Sir Charles Grandison (1753). Richardson was an established printer and publisher for most of his life and printed almost 500 different works, with journals and magazines.

Richardson embraced the epistolary novel form, which granted him "the tools, the space, and the freedom to develop distinctly different characters speaking directly to the reader". The characters of Pamela, Clarissa, and Grandison are revealed in a personal way, with the first two using the epistolary form for "dramatic" purposes, and the last for "celebratory" purposes.

In his first novel, Pamela, he explored the various complexities of the title character's life, and the letters allow the reader to witness her develop and progress over time. The novel was an experiment, but it allowed Richardson to create a complex heroine through a series of her letters. When Richardson wrote Clarissa, he had more experience in the form and expanded the letter writing to four different correspondents, which created a complex system of characters encouraging each other to grow and develop over time. However, the villain of the story, Lovelace, is also involved in the letter writing, and this leads to tragedy.

Leo Braudy described the benefits of the epistolary form of Clarissa as, "Language can work: letters can be ways to communicate and justify". By the time Richardson wrote Grandison, he transformed the letter writing from telling of personal insights and explaining feelings into a means for people to communicate their thoughts on the actions of others and for the public to celebrate virtue.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 2.5
( 6 )
Rating Distribution

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(2)

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Sort by: Showing all of 6 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 19, 2012

    Contains Everything! Yes this includes Clarissa, Sir Charles Gr

    Contains Everything!

    Yes this includes Clarissa, Sir Charles Grandison and everything that Richardson wrote!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 8, 2012

    I bought this for clarissa

    I bought this for clarissa and it isn't included. What a waste!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted August 31, 2011

    Missing stuff?

    I just bought this for Sir Charles Grandison and it isn't there, just Pamela and Letters to Montaign, neither of which I need

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 14, 2013

    The is NOT the COMPLETE works: summary is wrong

    Contains only Pamela and a translation of Montaigne's Letters. Does NOT include Clarissa or The History of Sir Charles Grandison.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 10, 2013

    False advertising--as previously noted by other reviewers, it do

    False advertising--as previously noted by other reviewers, it does not include all the works listed (no Clarissa or Charles Grandison).

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 18, 2011

    Brilliant

    Sir Charles Grandison is one of the most brilliant pieces of fiction ever written.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
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