Samuel Todd's Book of Great Colors

Samuel Todd's Book of Great Colors

by E. L. Konigsburg
     
 

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Samuel Todd loves all the great colors in the world: orange, green, red, blue, purple and pink. He knows that some of the best things--such as kisses and hugs--don't have colors at all. Color illustrations throughout by two-time Newbery Medalist E.L. Konigsburg.

Overview

Samuel Todd loves all the great colors in the world: orange, green, red, blue, purple and pink. He knows that some of the best things--such as kisses and hugs--don't have colors at all. Color illustrations throughout by two-time Newbery Medalist E.L. Konigsburg.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
In the Newbery Medalist's first picture book, simple paintings--mostly of fruits, vegetables and animals--introduce colors to young readers. Accompanying each illustration are several lines of text, which range from the banal (``A pumpkin is all orange, but not all orange is a pumpkin.'') to the more imaginative and humorous (``When you see a lot of gray shaped like an elephant, it is one.''). The book's title seems to be little more than an indulgent device, since Todd, the author's grandson, is pictured on only four pages. In addition, children may wonder what makes these 11 colors ``great'': the selection is certainly from a standard spectrum. Considering the many similar books available on the topic, this Book of Great Colors falls short of being a great book of colors. Ages 2-5. (Feb.)
Children's Literature - Meredith Kiger
Originally written with a color-blind grandchild in mind, this wonderful approach to learning and reinforcing colors will fascinate youngsters. The illustrations are singular and literally jump off the page in size and color. The text is minimal and somewhat out of the ordinary, which makes it even more appealing and quirky. The grandmother/author's love for her grandson is evident on every page. 1999 (orig.
School Library Journal
PreS-K-- This color attribute (rather than identification) book has audience problems. The opening illustration, ``A pumpkin is all orange'' clearly shows a green stem, and literal-minded children will be quick to point this out. Accurately painted in full color, other foods such as egg yolks, pickles, spinach, and eggplant seem curious choices to demonstrate colors for an age group known for rigid food preferences. A multiracial group of children, each wearing different colored suspenders and different kinds of pants, underlines color variety and diversity: ``Some things can be any great color.'' Paintings of Samuel Todd, Konigsburg's winsome grandson, appear in the opening and closing pages but do not lend much to the child appeal. An open-ended invitation to consider some of the best things that have no color, such as kisses, is followed by an off-putting ``Wrong: Kisses are pink.'' Samuel Todd is shown with a big pink lipstick blot on his cheek, looking confused. Readers probably will be, too. A more focused color attribute book is Mary O'Neill's Hailstones and Halibut Bones (Doubleday, 1973), and a livelier one is Mary Serfozo's Who Said Red? (McElderry, 1988). --Susan Hepler, Arlington Public Library, VA

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780689832185
Publisher:
Aladdin
Publication date:
09/28/1999
Edition description:
REPRINT
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
9.52(w) x 9.54(h) x 0.12(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

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