Sandbear

Sandbear

by Shen Roddie, Jenny Jones
     
 

Sandbear is a touching story about a hare who hastily builds a new friend out of sand while playing at the beach. But in a moment of laziness, Hare gives Sandbear a single grass arm, a tiny pinhole mouth, and short stubby legs. Sandbear, however, has the heart of a true friend. When Hare falls into a hole, Sandbear pours himself into fill the hole to rescue

Overview

Sandbear is a touching story about a hare who hastily builds a new friend out of sand while playing at the beach. But in a moment of laziness, Hare gives Sandbear a single grass arm, a tiny pinhole mouth, and short stubby legs. Sandbear, however, has the heart of a true friend. When Hare falls into a hole, Sandbear pours himself into fill the hole to rescue Hare. An appreciative Hare rebuilds Sandbear, but this time with all the right Bear-y parts. Sandbear is as sunny as a day at the beach and as fresh as a sea breeze.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Out in the dunes, a wild wind blew and the sands shivered. It made quivery sand waves and puffy little sandhills. With this lilting beginning, Roddie (Too Close Friends) launches a magical tale about imagination, creativity and responsibility. The mounds of shifting sand inspire Hare, a towering, dapper fellow in a red vest and floppy hat, to sculpt a bear. But the harried Hare doesn't take great pains with his art unlike Welsh artist Jones, whose golden-hued, finely textured acrylic paintings exude a meticulous sense of craftsmanship. I'd love to make you handsomer but it's hard work and I don't have all day, Hare says to his creation. He tosses sand about to fashion an approximation of an ursine body, pokes in a single strand of sandgrass for an arm and slaps on a piece of driftwood for the nose. Hare abandons the sand sculpture without another thought, but Sandbear shivers to life an eager-to-please gentle giant. When Sandbear proves he's willing to sacrifice himself to save his creator, Hare realizes there's more to what he's made than a moment's diversion. Jones depicts a tearful Hare devotedly recrafting Sandbear with the substantial features of a hero. A lovely, understated joy radiates from the final scene, in which the rejuvenated Sandbear piggybacks Hare into the woods for a picnic the beginning of a beautiful friendship. Ages 4-up. (June) Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Hare hastily sculpts a bear from sand one day on the beach, barely finishing it with a tiny mouth and a blade of grass for a hand, then leaving it for his lunch. Feeling cold and hungry, Sandbear comes to life, shuffling on his inadequate feet toward warmth, unable to eat with his too-small mouth. When he finds Hare stuck in a deep hole, he sacrifices himself into a pile of sand so Hare can climb out. Grateful, Hare refashions the bear, giving him all he needs to become his happy friend. Jones supplies appealingly simple, textured paintings to this fantasy of an odd friendship. Hare is expressively anthropomorphic in his plaid shirt, red vest and hat. Sandbear gradually evolves from amorphous sand to a lively, strong figure. 2002, Bloomsbury Children's Books/St Martin's Press,
— Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-When Hare spies a potential form in a sandhill, he is inspired to stop and sculpt a delightful "Sandbear." The artist is enthusiastic, but a bit careless in creating his friend. It's not clear why he's in such a rush, but he is, and he deems two short legs enough "for a bear who's not going anywhere" and a blade of grass sufficient for a hand. Little does Hare suspect that his creation has a mind of his own and will shuffle off to the woods to stay warm when the wind starts to blow. It is fortunate for Hare that he does, for Sandbear hears Hare's cries for help and sacrifices himself to save his friend. A regretful protagonist uses the same sand to create a new Sandbear, this time with strong arms for hugging; bigger, bright eyes for seeing; and a B-I-G mouth for sharing food on picnics. Jones's lovely paintings beautifully illustrate this charming story of friendship. Sandbear is a delightful, wistful, appealing creature who will enchant children and make them long for their very own sand friends.-Robin L. Gibson, Perry County District Library, New Lexington, OH Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Hare builds a bear out of sand, but doesn't take much effort to do it right-he gives his Sandbear a tiny mouth, a strand of grass for a hand (only one), small bumps for legs, driftwood for a nose, and no clothes. When Hare goes home for lunch, Sandbear gets cold and tries to shuffle into the forest to get warm; then gets hungry and tries unsuccessfully to pick up and eat a carrot with his grass hand and pinhole mouth. When Sandbear discovers that Hare has fallen into a hole, he sacrifices himself by jumping into the hole to make a pile of sand big enough for Hare to use to climb out of the hole. Overcome with remorse at seeing only sand, grass, and pebbles remaining in the hole, Hare resolves to rebuild his friend more completely and give him some clothes this time. The scenes of poor Sandbear shuffling along and trying to eat with one ineffective hand are a bit disturbing, and even more so when Hare pulls the grass hand off trying to get out of the hole. Although the initial premise of playing in the sand and creating an imaginary playmate provide appeal, kids may feel pity for Sandbear and dislike for Hare rather than relating to either one. Painterly illustrations featuring beach colors of sandy yellow and the aqua of the sea and sky are appealing and evoke the feeling of the seashore, but don't quite make up for the strange, sad story. (Picture book. 4-8)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582347585
Publisher:
Bloomsbury USA
Publication date:
06/01/2002
Edition description:
1ST US
Pages:
32
Product dimensions:
11.10(w) x 10.02(h) x 0.39(d)
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Shen Roddie is the author of many fine books for children including Toes are to Tickle. She was born in Singapore and began her writing career as journalist and also worked as head of media for Shell Company and as a free-lance copy-writer before becoming a children's book author. She now lives in Oxford, England.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >