×

Uh-oh, it looks like your Internet Explorer is out of date.

For a better shopping experience, please upgrade now.

Sandor Ferenczi - Ernest Jones: Letters 1911-1933
     

Sandor Ferenczi - Ernest Jones: Letters 1911-1933

by Sandor Ferenczi, Ernest Jones, Ferenc Eros, Ken Robinson, Judit Szekacs-Weisz
 

See All Formats & Editions

The Ferenczi-Jones correspondence presented here is an important document of the early history of psychoanalysis. It spans more than two decades, and addresses many of the relevant issues of the psychoanalytic movement between 1911-1933, such as Freud's relation to Stekel, Adler and Jung; the First World Wa;, the debates of the 1920s regarding the theoretical and

Overview

The Ferenczi-Jones correspondence presented here is an important document of the early history of psychoanalysis. It spans more than two decades, and addresses many of the relevant issues of the psychoanalytic movement between 1911-1933, such as Freud's relation to Stekel, Adler and Jung; the First World Wa;, the debates of the 1920s regarding the theoretical and technical ideas of Rank and Ferenczi; problems of leadership, structure, and finding a centre for the psychoanalytical movement; as well as issues related to telepathy and lay analysis. It includes thirty-seven letters and six postcards, as well as original documents waiting to be found for eight decades; these belong to the 'private', personal history of psychoanalysis and help to decode diverse aspects of the experience preserved in these documentary memories of former generations.Perhaps the most interesting aspect of this correspondence is how it allows us to build up a far more nuanced picture of the development of an extraordinary relationship between Ferenczi and Jones. It could hardly be termed harmonious, and was not devoid of rivalry and jealousy, sometimes even of hidden passion and outright hostility. Nevertheless, friendship, sympathy, collegiality and readiness for cooperation were just as important for Ferenczi and Jones as rivalry, mistrust and suspicion. This volume celebrates the 100th anniversary of the foundation in 1913 of both the British and the Hungarian Psychoanalytical Societies.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781781812280
Publisher:
Karnac Books
Publication date:
06/01/2013
Series:
History of Psychoanalysis Series
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
224
File size:
2 MB

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Sandor Ferenczi (7 July 1873 - 22 May 1933) was a Hungarian psychoanalyst, a key theorist of the psychoanalytic school and a close associate of Sigmund Freud whod latter wrote that Ferenczi made "all analysts his students", a fitting tribute to a towering figure of psychoanalysis. In 1910, at Freud's suggestion, Ferenczi proposed the founding of the International Psychoanalytic Association, and in 1913 founded the Hungarian Psychoanalytic Society. In 1916 he underwent a brief personal analysis with Freud, and in 1918 was elected president of the International Psychoanalytic Society. Ferenczi's early contributions to psychoanalysis have been so fully assimilated that their origin is often forgotten, although his later writings, which were more speculative and deviated from Freudian orthodoxy, have been less widely accepted. He is acknowledged to have been a gifted therapist. He proposed a number of innovations in technique including at first these centered on the so-called "active" technique, while his later study of reactions of disappointment and mistrust that the child suffers in his relationship with his parents inspired a few of his pupils, notably Alice Balint (1949), to investigate early parent-child relationships.
Ferenc Eros studied psychology and literature at the ELTE University in Budapest. He is Professor of Social Psychology at the Faculty of Humanities of the University of Pecs, where he is director of a doctoral programme in psychoanalytic studies since 1997. The focus of his present research areas include the social and cultural history of psychoanalysis in Central Europe, psychoanalytic theory and its application to social issues, the problem of trauma and cultural memory. He edited the Hungarian translation of the Freud-Ferenczi correspondence and founded 'Thalassa', the journal of the Sandor Ferenczi Society in Budapest, which he edited from 1990-2010. At present, he edits 'Imago Budapest', the journal of the Hungarian Imago Association.
Ken Robinson is a psychoanalyst in private practice in Newcastle upon Tyne and the Honorary Archivist for the British Psychoanalytical Society. He is a training analyst for trainings in child,adolescent and adult psychotherapy in the North of England and in Scotland. He lectures and teaches in the UK and Europe, and is especially interested in the developmental point of view, the nature of therapeutic action, and the history of psychoanalysis. His most recent publication is a brief history of the British Psychoanalytical Society.
Judit Szekacs-Weisz is a bilingual psychoanalyst and psychotherapist, a member of the British and the Hungarian Psychoanalytical Society. Born and educated (mostly) in Budapest, she has absorbed the ideas and way of thinking of Ferenczi, the Balints, Hermann, and Rajka as integral parts of a "professional mother tongue". She is author of several articles, and co-editor of 'Lost Childhood and the Language of Exile'. Together with Tom Keve she co-edited 'Ferenczi and His World' and 'Ferenczi for Our Time'.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Post to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews