BN.com Gift Guide

Santa Fe Rules (Ed Eagle Series #1)

( 38 )

Overview

Successful movie producer Wolf Willett is stunned when he sees his own death reported in a major newspaper. It says he was a victim in a triple homicide during a sordid tryst with his wife and a friend. But who is the unidentified corpse? Why can't Wolf remember anything about the night in question? And who wants him dead?

Wolf had the means and motive—and his inexplicable memory loss seems far too suspicious to suit Sante Fe's crusading D.A., who promptly has Wolf arrested. And...

See more details below
Paperback (Mass Market Paperback - Reprint)
$9.99
BN.com price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (50) from $1.99   
  • New (10) from $5.18   
  • Used (40) from $1.99   
Santa Fe Rules (Ed Eagle Series #1)

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 7.0
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK 10.1
  • NOOK HD Tablet
  • NOOK HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK eReaders
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$9.99
BN.com price

Overview

Successful movie producer Wolf Willett is stunned when he sees his own death reported in a major newspaper. It says he was a victim in a triple homicide during a sordid tryst with his wife and a friend. But who is the unidentified corpse? Why can't Wolf remember anything about the night in question? And who wants him dead?

Wolf had the means and motive—and his inexplicable memory loss seems far too suspicious to suit Sante Fe's crusading D.A., who promptly has Wolf arrested. And when another murder complicates the scenario, he turns to hot-shot criminal attorney Ed Eagle to help clear his name—and stop a killer who's determined to finish the job.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780061711633
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 12/30/2008
  • Series: Ed Eagle Series , #1
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 400
  • Sales rank: 264,549
  • Product dimensions: 4.18 (w) x 7.50 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Stuart Woods

Stuart Woods is the author of more than forty novels, including the New York Times bestselling Stone Barrington and Holly Barker series. An avid sailor and pilot, he lives in New York City, Florida, and Maine.

Biography

Stuart Woods was born in 1938 in Manchester, Georgia. After graduating from college and enlisting in the Air National Guard, he moved to New York, where he worked in advertising for the better part of the 1960s. He spent three years in London working for various ad agencies, then moved to Ireland in 1973 to begin his writing career in earnest.

However, despite his best intentions, Woods got sidetracked in Ireland. He was nearly 100 pages into a novel when he discovered the seductive pleasures of sailing. "Everything went to hell," he quips on his web site "All I did was sail." He bought a boat, learned everything he could about celestial navigation, and competed in the Observer Singlehanded Transatlantic Race (OSTAR) in 1976, finishing respectably in the middle of the fleet. (Later, he took part in the infamous Fastnet Race of 1979, a yachting competition that ended tragically when a huge storm claimed the lives of 15 sailors and 4 observers. Woods and his crew emerged unharmed.)

Returning to the U.S., Woods wrote two nonfiction books: an account of his transatlantic sailing adventures (Blue Water, Green Skipper) and a travel guide he claims to have written on a whim. But the book that jump-started his career was the opus interruptus begun in Ireland. An absorbing multigenerational mystery set in a small southern town, Chiefs was published in 1981, went on to win an Edgar Award, and was subsequently turned into a television miniseries starring Charlton Heston.

An amazingly prolific author, Woods has gone on to pen dozens of compelling thrillers, juggling stand-alone novels with installments in four successful series. (His most popular protagonists are New York cop-turned-attorney Stone Barrington, introduced in 1991's New York Dead, and plucky Florida police chief Holly Barker, who debuted in 1998's Orchid Beach.) His pleasing mix of high-octane action, likable characters, and sly, subversive humor has made him a hit with readers -- who have returned the favor by propelling his books to the top of the bestseller lists.

Good To Know

Some fascinating facts about Stuart Woods:

His first job was in advertising at BBDO in New York, and his first assignment was to write ads for CBS-TV shows. He recalls: "They consisted of a drawing of the star and one line of exactly 127 characters, including spaces, and I had to write to that length. It taught me to be concise."

He flies his own airplane, a single-engine turboprop called a Jetprop, and tours the country every year in it, including book tours.

He's a partner in a 1929 motor yacht called Belle and spends two or three weeks a year aboard her.

In 1961-62, Woods spent 10 months in Germany with the National Guard at the height of the Berlin Wall Crisis.

In October and November of 1979, he skippered a friend's yacht back across the Atlantic, with a crew of six, calling at the Azores, Madeira, and the Canary Islands and finishing at Antigua in the Caribbean.

Read More Show Less
    1. Hometown:
      Key West, Florida; Mt. Desert, Maine; New York, New York
    1. Date of Birth:
      January 9, 1938
    2. Place of Birth:
      Manchester, Georgia
    1. Education:
      B.A., University of Georgia, 1959
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Santa Fe Rules

Chapter One

Wolf Willett remembered too late that Flaps had always had a cold nose. Now it found the back of his neck, and with a girlish shriek, Wolf sat bolt upright in bed and regarded her with bleary eyes. There was only a faint glow of daylight from outside.

"Got me again, didn't you?" he said to her.

Flaps grinned. This grin had always been one of her great charms, and it did not fail to do its work now.

Wolf melted. "Time to get up, huh?"

Flaps laid her head in his lap and grinned again, looking up at him with big brown eyes.

"Right now?" he asked, teasing her.

Right now, she replied, thumping her tail against the bed for emphasis.

"All right, all right." He moaned and swung his legs over the side of the bed.

Flaps celebrated her triumph with a little golden retriever dance, throwing in a couple of squeals of happiness.

"Okay," Wolf said, standing up, "but me first." He headed for the bathroom, but somehow one leg seemed shorter than the other; he missed the bathroom door and bumped into the wall. "Whoof," he said to Flaps. "What did I have to drink last night?" He shook his head and stretched his eyes wide open, but the dizziness, not an unpleasant sensation, remained. He groped his way into the bathroom, using the walls for support, and peed, holding on to the toilet with one hand.

Flaps rewarded him with a little kiss on the ass.

"Jesus!" he screamed, jumping away and grabbing the sink for support. "You really know how to wake a guy up, don't you?"

Flaps grinned and did her little dance.

"Just a minute, all right?" He splashed some water on his face, brushed his teeth too quickly, andtossed down a couple of vitamin C's with a glass of very cold water from the tap. He grabbed a bathrobe from the hook on the door and headed back to the bedroom in search of slippers. He was navigating better now, but as he proceeded out of the bedroom and across the living room he found himself moving slightly sideways, crablike, in order to maintain his course. Light was creeping across the valley below the house, across the suburbs of Santa Fe, but the interior of the house was still dimly lit, and in the kitchen he turned on the lights, squinting against the glare.

Flaps waited impatiently for him to get coffee started, then watched, rapt, as he poured her a dish of dry dog food. She ate daintily, as befitted her gender, while he got an English muffin into the toaster and rounded up butter and jam. He drank directly from a plastic container of fresh orange juice and returned it to the refrigerator, sighing as the sweet juice made its way down.

"Want to go out now?" he asked her.

To his surprise, she trotted across the room and scratched on the door that led to the guest wing of the house.

"That's not the back door, dummy," he railed at her, shaking his head. "It's this way, remember? The way you've gone out every day of your life?"

She scratched on the guest wing door again.

Wolf kept that part of the house closed and unheated until a guest arrived. "I think you must be as hung over as I am this morning." He slapped his thigh and whistled softly.

Reluctantly, Flaps followed him to the outside kitchen door and, when he opened it, bounded outside.

Wolf left her to roam the hillside, sniffing for coyote markings among the pi¤ons, and returned to his breakfast. He ate slowly and with a nearly blank mind. He did not think of the night before, did not try to remember what he drank, did not think of anything much until he remembered that he had to go to Los Angeles this morning. He looked at the clock on the microwave: just after seven. He calculated the time to the airport, time for the trip, time for the ride to the office. He'd be in L.A. by eleven; time for a sandwich at his desk before his meeting at two. It was Tuesday; he'd get six or seven hours of work in with the editor today and a full day tomorrow, then on Thursday he and Julia would have Thanksgiving dinner with their friends the Carmichaels.

Flaps, her ablutions completed and her survey of the property concluded, scratched on the back door.

He let her in, and she went straight to her cedar-shavings bed and settled in for her morning nap; she was as much a creature of habit as he.

Wolf shaved in the shower, using the mist-free mirror, then toweled himself dry and used the hair blower on his thick, graying hair. He still felt a light buzz, felt oddly free of worry; they were approaching completion of the new film, and he was usually nervous as hell at this point in a production, but today he couldn't think of anything to worry about. He was on automatic pilot as he dressed, doing the things he did every day. He slipped into freshly starched jeans and into the soft elkskin cowboy boots that added an inch and a half to his five-foot-nine-inch frame. He was the same height as Paul Newman, he told himself automatically, as he did every morning of his life, and, he reminded himself, the same age as Robert Redford. He wondered for a moment whether he would rather be the same height as Redford and the same age as Newman. It was a close call.

He slipped into a silk shirt and a cashmere sweater and, on his way back to the kitchen, retrieved a sheepskin coat from the hall closet. It would be a chilly morning, but he would shed both the outer garments before arriving in L.A. He took along a light blazer for the city.

As he came back into the kitchen, Flaps hopped out of her bed and went again to scratch on the guest wing door.

"What could you possibly want in there?" he demanded, and got a grin for an answer. "Listen, you," he said, shaking a finger at her, "I'm leaving Maria a note telling her you've already been fed, so don't try and get another breakfast out of her, you hear?"

Flaps looked suitably guilty, but she knew very well she'd be fed again by the housekeeper, who melted at the sight of her.

"Be good," he called out to her as he left by the kitchen door, "and don't eat the mailman." If an intruder ever actually got into the house, Wolf knew her plan would be to kiss him to death.

He opened the garage door, tossed the blazer onto the passenger seat of the Porsche Cabriolet, then eased into the car. It was like climbing into a deep freeze. He started the engine, and as he let it warm up, he thought of going back into the house and seeing what the dog wanted in the guest wing; it was unusual for her to display an interest in that part of the house when there were no guests on board. Oh, the hell with it, he thought. He backed out and started down the driveway, taking it slowly, since there was still snow there from the last bit of weather they'd had. The four-wheel drive of the car kept it nicely in the ruts of the driveway, and the main road out of Wilderness Gate had been plowed days before. He passed through the gate of the subdivision and headed down into the town.

There was little traffic at this hour of the morning, and Santa Fe looked beautiful with the low sunlight on the adobe houses and shops. Everything was adobe in Santa Fe--or, at least, stucco painted to look like adobe--and it reminded him a little of an English village in which all the houses were built of the same stone. The common building material gave the little city a certain visual harmony.

Wolf always felt grateful that he had chosen Santa Fe as a second home instead of Aspen or one of the other movie-colony favorites. It was harder to get to from L.A., but that kept out the riffraff, and anyway, he had his own airplane to get him there and back faster than the airlines could. Never mind that Julia didn't like the single-engine airplane and usually insisted on taking the airlines, when she couldn't hop a ride on somebody's jet; he liked flying alone. Today he would think about L.A. Days, the latest Wolf Willett production, written and directed, as usual, by Jack Tinney. The film wasn't right yet, and, since shooting had ended and the sets had been struck, it was going to have to be fixed in the editing, as it nearly always was with Jack's films.

As he drove, he used the car's telephone to get a weather forecast from F.A.A. Flight Services and to file an instrument flight plan from Santa Fe to Santa Monica Airport. He always flew on instrument flight plans, even in clear weather; it was like being led by the hand, especially when arriving in L.A. airspace, which was always smoggy and crowded. Santa Fe airport was virtually deserted at this hour of the morning. He drove along the ramp to his T-hangar, opened it, parked the Porsche behind the airplane, and pulled the airplane out of the hangar with a tow bar, then locked up. Normally, during business hours, he would simply call ahead and Capitol Aviation, the F.B.O. (fixed base operator--a name left over from flying's barnstorming days), would bring up the airplane for him, but today he was too early for them. Anyway, he liked the idea of the Porsche being locked in the hangar instead of being left in the airport parking lot for days on end. Santa Fe Rules. Copyright © by Stuart Woods. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
( 38 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(15)

4 Star

(12)

3 Star

(9)

2 Star

(1)

1 Star

(1)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 20, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    Could have been very good.

    Decent mystery, well written, good plot. The main character (Ed Eagle) is a good character and entertaining. However, the reader doesn't even meet him until the second third of the book. He does not appear as much as the secondary character (Wolf Willett) and if one didn't know better, one would think Wolf was the main character.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2009

    I Also Recommend:

    Stewart Woods is a good writer

    I have always enjoyed Stewart Woods books. He is a good mystery writer and you can never put his books down once you start reading them. Woods has several books with different characters creating a series for each character.<BR/><BR/>This book is first in the series featuring Ed Eagle. It is a good mystery book in the fact that you don't know who the killer is until you get towards the end. I won't give it away but it's not who you probably think it is.<BR/><BR/>A good read for them rainy days.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 5, 2003

    FOR ME, IT STARTED HERE.

    SINCE I READ THIS BOOK AT 1 SITTING, I HAVE NOW READ ALL OF STUART'S BOOKS. CAN'T SAY THEY WERE ALL AS GOOD AS THIS, BUT MOST WERE AND I WILL KEEP READING WHATEVER HE PUTS OUT. HE AND PATTERSON AND GRISHAM ARE AUTHORS I READ EVERYTHING.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted July 24, 2014

    Love this book.  I have never been that much into Legal thriller

    Love this book.  I have never been that much into Legal thrillers but this one was easy to read.  I can not wait until I read the next one.  I see though that Mr. Woods only wrote 4 books in this series.  We need more.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted January 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    This is a reprint of an exciting fast-paced early 1990s thriller

    Affluent Hollywood producer Wolf Willet cannot remember what he did the night before, but thinks nothing of it as he is flying on his private plane from his Santa Fe home to Los Angeles even with Thanksgiving being the next day. Engine trouble forces him to land near the Grand Canyon. While waiting for the repair with the holiday in the way of any maintenance occurring, he reads the New York Times only to find his wife Julia, his business partner and himself murdered.<BR/><BR/>Instead of reporting that the third body is not him, Wolf flies to Hollywood after his plane is repaired to finish his movie. A week later he hires defense lawyer Ed Eagle to defend him as he expects legal trouble. The Santa Fe cops suspect him of murder and have identified the other dead male as the ex-husband of Julia's look-alike sister Barbara who has a tryst with Ed. Soon another homicide occurs and Wolf is arrested for the murders just when he leans his late wife stole over three million dollars from him, but remains ignorant to a hit called on him. <BR/><BR/>This is a reprint of an exciting fast-paced early 1990s thriller that is fun to read, but stretches plausibility further than the distance between Santa Fe and Hollywood. The twists starting with the insanity of finishing the movie instead of either going with a lawyer to the cops or gong underground as an amateur sleuth to spins on siblings that seem unreal, but in fairness add entertainment. Far from Stuart Woods' best work, his most dedicated fans will enjoy Wolf playing hardball by Hollywood make believe rules in Santa Fe.<BR/><BR/>Harriet Klausner

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2002

    Awesome Book! Awesome Writer!

    This was the first book I read of his! I have read them all now. He is a very talented writer. You will just love this book!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 4, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 7, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 16, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 17, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 20, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted June 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted May 22, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 13, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 38 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)