Santana III

Santana III

5.0 3
by Santana

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Santana III is an album that undeservingly stands in the shadows behind the towering legend that is the band's second album, Abraxas. This was also the album that brought guitarist Neal Schon -- who was 17 years old -- into the original core lineup of Santana. Percussionist…  See more details below


Santana III is an album that undeservingly stands in the shadows behind the towering legend that is the band's second album, Abraxas. This was also the album that brought guitarist Neal Schon -- who was 17 years old -- into the original core lineup of Santana. Percussionist Thomas "Coke" Escovedo was brought in to replace (temporarily) José Chepitó Areas, who had suffered a brain aneurysm, yet who recovered quickly and rejoined the band. The rest were Carlos, organist Gregg Rolie, drummer Michael Schrieve, bassist David Brown, and conguero Michael Carabello. "Batuka" is the powerful first evidence of something being very different. The band was rawer, darker, and more powerful with twin leads and Schon's harder, edgier rock & roll sound paired with Carlos' blend of ecstatic high notes and soulful fills. It cooks -- funky, mean, and tough. "Batuka" immediately transforms itself into "No One to Depend On," by Escovedo, Carabello, and Rolie. The middle section is highlighted by frantic handclaps, call-and-response lines between Schon and Rolie, and Carlos joining the fray until the entire track explodes into a frenzied finale. And what's most remarkable is that the set just keeps on cooking, from the subtle slow burn of "Taboo" to the percussive jam workout that is "Toussaint l'Overture," a live staple in the band's set list recorded here for the first time (and featuring some cooking Rolie organ work at its beginning). "Everybody's Everything" is here, as is "Guajira" and "Jungle Strut" -- tunes that are still part of Santana's live show. With acoustic guitars, gorgeous hand percussion, and Santana's fragile lead vocal, "Everything's Coming Our Way" is the only "feel good" track here, but it's a fitting way to begin winding the album down with its Schon and Santana guitar breaks. The album ends with a completely transformed reading of Tito Puente's "Para los Rumberos," complete with horns and frantic, almost insanely fast hand drumming and cowbell playing. It's an album that has aged extremely well due to its spare production (by Carlos and the band) and its live sound. This is essential Santana, a record that deserves to be reconsidered in light of its lasting abundance and vision.

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Product Details

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Album Credits

Performance Credits

Santana   Primary Artist
Michael Shrieve   Percussion,Drums,Vibes
Linda Tillery   Background Vocals
Neal Schon   Guitar
Luis Gasca   Trumpet
José Chepitó Areas   Percussion,Conga,Drums,Flugelhorn,Timbales,Vocals,Rums
Gregg Rolie   Organ,Piano,Vocals
Coke Escovedo   Percussion,Timbales,Background Vocals
David Brown   Bass
Mike Carabello   Percussion,Conga,Tambourine,Vocals,Background Vocals
Greg Errico   Tambourine,Tamboura
Mario Ochoa   Piano,Soloist
Rico Reyes   Vocals,Background Vocals
Carlos Santana   Guitar,Vocals
Tower Of Power Horns   Horn,Group

Technical Credits

Michael Shrieve   Composer,Producer
Neal Schon   Composer,Producer
Gene Ammons   Composer
Santana   Audio Production
José Chepitó Areas   Composer,Producer
Danny Joe Brown   Composer
Gregg Rolie   Composer,Producer
Milton Brown   Composer
Coke Escovedo   Percussion Assistant
David Brown   Composer,Producer,Engineer
Mike Carabello   Composer,Producer
Glen Kolotkin   Engineer
Mike Larner   Engineer
Rico Reyes   Composer
D. Brown   Composer,Engineer
Carlos Santana   Composer,Producer
Josh Cheuse   Art Direction
Teddy Moss   Composer
Elizabeth Calleja   Graphic Design
Santana Musicians   Producer
Tyrone Moss   Composer

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Santana III 5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
Two elements not reenacted often in the many Santana line-ups exist in this album: - Neal Schon's guitar adds such dimension to this album, an actual dialog between the two guitarists can be imagined. Their reference to "Toussaint Loverture" is a good example of it. - and the addition of Tower of Power awesome horn section in (only) one track: "Everybody's Everything". Not for the faint-hearted but still one of the best albums of the band, especially if you like drums and percussions.
JohnQ More than 1 year ago
Santana begins to reach beyond his first two albums and does so with wonderful results. This one has a couple of well known radio hits but it also has some excellent musical adventures that don't get the airplay that they really deserve. Even after all these years, I play this one a lot.
footpathcowboy More than 1 year ago
SANTANA III is the last album by the group to feature all of the original members, in addition to introducing new guitarist Neal Schon. Schon added his own guitar style, which complimented Carlos Santana's perfectly. Carlos himself sang lead on the ballad "Everything's Coming Our Way", which proved that he could sing as well as play great guitar in the mold of B.B. King and Otis Rush. As great as this CD is, you can't help but wish that this lineup had stayed together longer.