Sarah the Priestess: The First Matriarch of Genesis

Overview


The only source in which Sarah is mentioned is the Book of Genesis, which contains very few highly selective and rather enigmatic stories dealing with her. On the surface, these stories tell us very little about Sarah, and what they do tell is complicated and confused by the probability that it represents residue surviving from two different written sources based on two independent oral traditions. Nevertheless, the role which Sarah plays, in the Genesis narratives, apears to be a highly energetic one, a role so...
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Overview


The only source in which Sarah is mentioned is the Book of Genesis, which contains very few highly selective and rather enigmatic stories dealing with her. On the surface, these stories tell us very little about Sarah, and what they do tell is complicated and confused by the probability that it represents residue surviving from two different written sources based on two independent oral traditions. Nevertheless, the role which Sarah plays, in the Genesis narratives, apears to be a highly energetic one, a role so active, in fact, that it repeatedly overshadows that of her husband.

In a patriarchal environment such as the Canaan of Genesis, the situation is discordant and problematic. Dr. Teubal suggests that the difficulty is eliminated, however, if we understand that Sarah and the other matriarchs mentioned in the narratives acted within the established, traditional Mesopotamian role of priestess, of a class of women who retained a highly privileged position vis-a-vis their husbands.

Dr. Teubal shows that the “Sarah tradition” represents a nonpatriarchal system struggling for survival in isolation, in the patriarchal environment of what was for Sarah a foreign society. She further indicates that the insistence of Sarah and Rebekah that their sons and heirs marry wives from the old homeland had to do not so much with preference for endogamy and cousin marriage as with their intention of ensuring the continuation of their old kahina-tradition against the overwhelming odds represented by patriarchal Canaan.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780804008440
  • Publisher: Ohio University Press
  • Publication date: 7/28/1984
  • Edition description: 1
  • Pages: 222
  • Sales rank: 1,447,847
  • Product dimensions: 6.00 (w) x 9.00 (h) x 0.47 (d)

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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted January 15, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    Challenging Accepted Perceptions...

    After reading "The Woman Who Named God" , "Sarah", and "Abraham, A Journey to the Heart of Three Faiths"... all historical fiction; I wanted more information on the priestess/Sarah connection. This book gives known historical facts and relates them to the Bible's story with adequate logical conclusions. This book challenges widely accepted views, without discrediting the entire Biblical representation. This period of history has many gaps... it is enlightening to imagine all the possibilities. This isn't a fun to read book, it is for people truly interested in expanding their perceptions on the story of Sarah and Abraham... and the time period in which it is believed they lived.

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