Sartor Resartus

Sartor Resartus

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by Thomas Carlyle
     
 

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Literally meaning "The tailor re-tailored," "Sartor Resartus" is Thomas Carlyle's 1836 novel which was first serialized in "Fraser's Magazine" in 1833-1834. The novel poses as a review for the work "Clothes, Their Origin and Influence" by the fictional philosopher Diogenes Teufelsdrockh, Professor of "Things in… See more details below

Overview

Literally meaning "The tailor re-tailored," "Sartor Resartus" is Thomas Carlyle's 1836 novel which was first serialized in "Fraser's Magazine" in 1833-1834. The novel poses as a review for the work "Clothes, Their Origin and Influence" by the fictional philosopher Diogenes Teufelsdrockh, Professor of "Things in General" at Weissnichtwo University. Intended by Carlyle as a new kind of book, "Sartor Resartus" is at once a work of fiction and social philosophy that challenges the reader to determine what is truth and what is merely the invention of the author. The exploration of fashion through the fictional work discussed in the book exists as an allegory to explore the changing conventions of other elements of culture and society. "Sartor Resartus" marked an important transition from the Romantic and Victorian periods, whose influence on countless other literary figures cannot be understated.

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From the Publisher

"The character of his influences is best seen in the fact that many of the men who have least agreement with his opinions are those to whom the reading of Sartor Resartus was an epoch in the history of their minds."  —George Eliot

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780460012782
Publisher:
Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
Publication date:
01/01/1954
Product dimensions:
20.00(w) x 20.00(h) x 20.00(d)

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Meet the Author


Thomas Carlyle published several books including The French Revolution (1837), On Heroes, Hero Worship and the Heroic in History (1841), and Past and Present (1843). Carlyle's books and articles inspired social reformers such as John Ruskin, Charles Dickens, John Burns, Tom Mann, and William Morris. However, although he had originally held progressive political views, Carlyle became increasingly conservative in the late 1840s. This is reflected in the right-wing, anti-democratic attitudes expressed in his collected essays Latter Day Pamphlets (1850) and his admiration for strong leaders illustrated by his six volume History of Frederick the Great (1858-1865) and The Early Kings of Norway (1875).

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