Satellites

Satellites

by Steve Parker, David West
     
 

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A look at many of the twentieth century's most significant inventions and discoveries, with special emphasis on some of the important technological advances. Full color photos and accessible and accurate text are combined to provide science and technology information for budding readers.

Overview

A look at many of the twentieth century's most significant inventions and discoveries, with special emphasis on some of the important technological advances. Full color photos and accessible and accurate text are combined to provide science and technology information for budding readers.

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Barbara L. Talcroft
Focusing on technology, this “Story of Space” series introduces middle readers to progress in space research, exploration, and understanding the solar system. On ample pages with black backgrounds, readers will find explanatory text, small photographs, and larger labeled photos of vehicle parts and construction. Parker begins with the shock of the Russian space launch in 1957 and the failure of the first American attempt—by January 1958, Explorer 1 put the U.S. into the race. Early satellites were small, for weather research and TV footage of Earth’s surface. Uses for satellites quickly expanded, first for geostatic communications, then for navigation, like the Global Positioning System. Earth imaging has been extremely successful, especially in charting human impact on the environment. Pages on weather satellites are well-illustrated, with photos of Hurricanes Katrina and Andrew and labeled sections of a polar-orbiting satellite. Prompted by concerns about global warming, research satellites now include technology for collecting data on carbon dioxide levels, aerosol levels, and weather events like wildfires and dust storms. In 1977, scientists began work on orbiting space telescopes—their triumph was the great Hubble Telescope, in service since 1993. Hubble has penetrated galaxies in our solar system, nebulae, black holes, and even areas of the cosmos. (Recent space telescopes include Chandra observatory and the infrared-observing James Webb Space Telescope.) What’s in the future for satellites? Parker predicts possible anchoring of heavy satellites with a strong cable to an island or to a captured asteroid; satellites could also become more robotic, refueling and repairing older satellites in space. This volume offers fascinating information about the multiple ways satellites have affected life on Earth, though it may be most useful to readers who already have some background in space technology. Included is a chart showing types of satellites, orbit heights, applications, and costs. Reviewer: Barbara L. Talcroft; Ages 9 to 12.
School Library Journal
11/01/2015
Gr 4–6—These overviews will provide middle grade readers with sketchy but coherent pictures of space exploration's rapidly receding past as well as glimpses of its potential futures. Looking Beyond is a general history of the universe since the Big Bang, with a discussion of how we study exoplanets, speculations about interstellar expeditions, and information on permanent settlements on the Moon and Mars. Closer to home, Parker points out that Soyuz spacecrafts, originally designed for Moon flights in the 1960s, are still flying to the International Space Station. In Parker's view, the Soviet space program never really recovered from its "Moon Fiasco." Consequently, he focuses here largely on NASA programs and particularly its triumphs—from Mercury to the space shuttle in Space Pioneers and Race to the Moon and on the Explorer I to the New Horizons craft in Probes. Not that he's uncritical; though disasters such as the Apollo I fire or the Challenger explosion rate but bare acknowledgements, he notes the astronomical cost of each space shuttle launch ($1.3 billion) and ends Satellites with a chart that includes an average unit cost for each type of satellite (hint: they're not cheap). Small photographs, photorealistic renderings, and cutaway views of high-tech spacecraft illustrate the white-on-black mix of captions and short bursts of narrative text. Each volume ends with a summary chart—of space "firsts" in Space Pioneers, for instance, and an annotated list of manned and unmanned lunar missions in Race to the Moon—though none suggest leads to further resources. VERDICT Solid options to round out materials on space.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781625880796
Publisher:
Black Rabbit Books
Publication date:
09/28/2015
Product dimensions:
8.50(w) x 10.50(h) x 0.30(d)
Age Range:
9 - 12 Years

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