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The Satires of Horace
     

The Satires of Horace

by Horace, Christopher Smart (Translator)
 

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Ancient Rome had no shortage of great writers and poets, including Plutarch, Virgil, Ovid, Catullus, Tacitus, and countless others. One of the great Roman poets who is usually part of the conversation is Quintus Horatius Flaccus, known simply as Horace (65-8 B.C.). In fact, Horace was the preeminent Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus.

Overview

Ancient Rome had no shortage of great writers and poets, including Plutarch, Virgil, Ovid, Catullus, Tacitus, and countless others. One of the great Roman poets who is usually part of the conversation is Quintus Horatius Flaccus, known simply as Horace (65-8 B.C.). In fact, Horace was the preeminent Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus.
Horace may have had his greatest influence on the Middle Ages and Renaissance. While people today still echo his Carpe Diem, it's clear that his poetry influenced the works of poets such as Petrarch and Dante as well. His The Art of Poetry has been the standard guide on composing poetry for nearly 2,000 years.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
The lyric poetry of antiquity is often as important to modern poets as it is to translators and classical scholars. Mulroy is a professor of classics (Univ. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee), and Carson (classics, McGill Univ.; The Beauty of the Husband) and the late William Matthews (After All: Last Poems) are well-regarded poets. Following Pound's dictum to "make it new," Mulroy and Matthews translate Catullus and Horace into modern American idiom, striving where possible to find cultural equivalents rather than literal translations. At the same time, they try to be true to the shifting tones and rhythms of their originals. The results are fluent, giving some sense of the contemporaneousness that Catullus and Horace would have evoked in their audiences. Carson's translation follows Sappho's diction and form much more closely and includes the Greek original on the facing page. Much of what survives of Sappho are fragments, often just a stray word, phrase, or even a few letters. Like many modern poets, Carson deploys these on the blank page, letting their suggestiveness fill the gaps and create whole lyrics in the imagination of the readers. All three translators aim for a general audience, though Mulroy and Carson also include notes and introductions of value to the more scholarly reader. All three books are recommended for both public and academic libraries. T.L. Cooksey, Armstrong Atlantic State Univ., Savannah, GA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781519655028
Publisher:
CreateSpace Publishing
Publication date:
12/03/2015
Pages:
60
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 9.00(h) x 0.12(d)

Meet the Author


William Matthews was born in Cincinnati in 1942, and educated at Yale and the University of North Carolina. He published eleven books of poetry and received many prizes and awards, including the National Book Critics Circle Award for Time & Money (1996). Matthews taught at the City University of New York until his death in 1997.

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