Satires of Rome: Threatening Poses from Lucilius to Juvenal / Edition 1

Satires of Rome: Threatening Poses from Lucilius to Juvenal / Edition 1

by Kirk Freudenburg
     
 

The first complete study of Roman verse satire to appear since 1976 provides a fresh and exciting survey of the field. Rather than describing satire's history as a series of discrete achievements, it relates those achievements to one another in such a way that, in the movement from Lucilius, to Horace, to Persius, to Juvenal, we are made to sense, and see performed,… See more details below

Overview

The first complete study of Roman verse satire to appear since 1976 provides a fresh and exciting survey of the field. Rather than describing satire's history as a series of discrete achievements, it relates those achievements to one another in such a way that, in the movement from Lucilius, to Horace, to Persius, to Juvenal, we are made to sense, and see performed, the increasing pressure of imperial oversight in ancient Rome.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780521006217
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Publication date:
01/28/2011
Edition description:
New Edition
Pages:
308
Product dimensions:
5.98(w) x 8.98(h) x 0.71(d)

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Key dates for the study of Roman verse satire
Glossary of key names and technical terms
Introduction1
1Horace15
The diatribe satires (Sermones 1.1-1.3): "You're no Lucilius"15
Sermones book 1 and the problem of genre23
Remembered voices: satire made new in Sermones 1.127
The social poetics of Horatian libertas: since when is "enough" a "feast"?44
Hitting satire's finis: along for the ride in Sermones 1.551
Dogged by ambition: Sermones 1.6-1058
Book 2 and the totalitarian squeeze: new rules for a New Age71
Panegyric bluster and Ennius' Scipio in Horace, Sermones 2.182
Coming to terms with Scipio: the new look of post-Actian satire93
Big friends and bravado in Sermones 2.1100
Book 2 and the hissings of compliance108
Nasidienus' dinner-party: too much of not enough117
2Persius125
Of narrative and cosmogony: Persius and the invention of Nero125
The Prologue: top-down aesthetics and the making of oneself134
Faking it in Nero's orgasmatron: Persius 1 and the death of criticism151
The satirist-physician and his out-of-joint world173
Satire's lean feast: finding a lost "pile" in P. 2183
Teaching and tail-wagging, critique as crutch: P. 4189
Left for broke: satire as legacy in P. 6195
3Juvenal209
A lost voice found: Juvenal and the poetics of too much, too late209
Rememberred monsters: time warp and martyr tales in Trajan's Rome215
Ghost-assault in Juv. 1234
The poor man's Lucilius242
Life on the edge: from exaggeration to self-defeat248
Beating a dead fish: the emperor-satirist of Juv. 4258
Satires 3 and 5: the poor man's lunch of Umbricius and Trebius264
List of works cited278
General index285

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