BN.com Gift Guide

Satisfaction Guaranteed: The Making of the American Mass Market

Overview

This sweeping history provides the reader with a better understanding of America’s consumer society, obsession with shopping, and devotion to brands. Focusing on the advertising campaigns of Coca-Cola, Kellogg’s, Wrigley’s, Gillette, and Kodak, Strasser shows how companies created both national brands and national markets. These new brands eventually displaced generic manufacturers and created a new desire for brand-name goods. The book also details the rise and development of department stores such as Macy’s, ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (18) from $4.00   
  • New (6) from $11.68   
  • Used (12) from $4.00   
Sending request ...

Overview

This sweeping history provides the reader with a better understanding of America’s consumer society, obsession with shopping, and devotion to brands. Focusing on the advertising campaigns of Coca-Cola, Kellogg’s, Wrigley’s, Gillette, and Kodak, Strasser shows how companies created both national brands and national markets. These new brands eventually displaced generic manufacturers and created a new desire for brand-name goods. The book also details the rise and development of department stores such as Macy’s, grocery store chains such as A&P and Piggly Wiggly, and mail-order companies like Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Ward.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
“A meticulous, probing, and often colorful study of the origins and workings of the American mass market in its formative years.”—Los Angeles Times Book Review

Satisfaction Guaranteed brings the subject of mass-market society out of the clouds of theory and down to earth.”—Village Voice Literary Supplement

“Strasser shows how we have evolved into a consumer culture in which the creation of demand is central.”—Jonathan Yardley, Washington Post Book World
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
This well-researched and documented history of goods-and-customer interaction since the days of bartering is also a delightful overview of American shopping customs from 19th-century Main Street to today's malls. Early in the 20th century, Strasser shows, advertising of national brandsquotes unnec.?/unnec.gs launched products creating their own demand--safety razors, cameras, fountain pens (with attendant consumption of blades, film, etc.)--thus gradually displacing networks of generic manufacturers whose sales ``drummers'' fanned across America by rail and buggy. The development of department stores such as Macy's, mail-order giants like Sears Roebuck and Montgomery Ward, grocery chains foreshadowing supermarkets, ``aids'' like premiums, displays and trading stamps and the skyrocket successes of Coca-Cola and Wrigley's gum are only a fraction of the sweeping story, as the author of Never Done brings into focus major social and economic forces linked to our daily lives. (Nov.)
Library Journal
Strasser, who also has written a history of housework ( Never Done , LJ 5/1/81), explains how advertising techniques developed in the early years of this century, especially the brand-name concept, have shaped the modern American appetite for particular mass-produced goods. Beginning with Crisco in 1912, she describes various campaigns to sell new products, emphasizing how the goal from the outset has been ``to make people want things,'' which puts profits ahead of consumer needs. The legacy has been pernicious: ``a consumer culture that itself breeds constant discontent, depending always on individuals wanting more.'' Free enterprise advocates will take exception, but this thoughtful look at how Americans consume is worth anyone's time.-- Kenneth F. Kister, Poynter Inst. for Media Studies, St. Petersburg, Fla.
Booknews
A history of the marketing campaigns of such brands as Coca-Cola, Kellogg's, Wrigley's, and Kodak and an analysis of the creation of a market for mass-produced, trademarked goods. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781588341464
  • Publisher: Smithsonian Institution Press
  • Publication date: 10/28/2004
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 348
  • Product dimensions: 5.97 (w) x 8.98 (h) x 0.74 (d)

Meet the Author

Susan Strasser teaches history at the University of Delaware. Her books include Waste and Want: A Social History of Trash. She lives in Washington, DC.
Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 American pie 3
2 The name on the label 29
3 The chain of distribution 58
4 New products, new habits 89
5 Designing markets 124
6 Sales and promotions 163
7 The new retailing 203
8 The politics of packaged products 252
9 Epilogue 286
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)