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Saturn's Children

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Overview

Freya Nakamichi-47 is a femmebot, one of the last of her kind still functioning. With no humans left to pay for the pleasures she provides, she agrees to transport a mysterious package from Mercury to Mars-only to become hunted by some very powerful humanoids who will stop at nothing to possess the contents of the package.

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Saturn's Children

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Overview

Freya Nakamichi-47 is a femmebot, one of the last of her kind still functioning. With no humans left to pay for the pleasures she provides, she agrees to transport a mysterious package from Mercury to Mars-only to become hunted by some very powerful humanoids who will stop at nothing to possess the contents of the package.

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Editorial Reviews

New York Times
The act of creation seems to come easily to Charles Stross...He is peerless at dreaming up devices that could conceivably exist in 6, 60, or 600 years' time.
Gardner Dozois
Where Charles Stross goes today, the rest of science fiction will follow tomorrow. (Gardner Dozois, Editor, Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine)
Denver Post
Stross sizzles with ideas.
SF Revu
Charles Stross may be the science fiction field's most exciting writer.
Publishers Weekly

Sex oozes from every page of this erotic futuristic thriller. In a far-future class-driven android society, most of the populace are slave-chipped and owned by wealthy "aristos." When low-caste but unenslaved android Freya offends an aristo and needs to get off-world, she takes a courier position with the mysterious Jeeves Corporation, but the job turns out to have dangers of its own. Designed as a pleasure-module, Freya isn't quite as obsolete as she could be, as androids have sex with each other incessantly. Hugo-winner Stross (Halting State) has a deep message of how android slavery recapitulates humanity's past mistakes, but he struggles to make it heard over the moans and gunshots. Readers nostalgic for the SF of the '60s will find much that's familiar (including Freya's jumpsuit-clad form on the cover), but that doesn't quite compensate for the flaws. (July)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

After the extinction of the human race in the 23rd century, robots and androids continue to function, forming their own stratified society to carry out their creators' dreams of space colonization. Freya Nakamichi 47-a femmebot designed as a concubine for a race that no longer exists-occupies a place in society midway between the elite Aristos and the slave-chipped worker robots. Having to make her own way, she accepts a commission to deliver a small package from Mercury to Mars, unaware of the trouble that awaits her as humanoid factions vie for the contents of the package. The author of Singularity Sky and The Atrocity Archives always brings a fresh perspective to the genre, reinventing the future in bold new ways. Part space opera, part homage to late sf Grand Masters Robert Heinlein and Isaac Asimov, this tale of a very "human" android belongs in most sf collections.
—Jackie Cassada

The Barnes & Noble Review
When science fiction fans wax nostalgic for the novels of Robert A. Heinlein, they are more likely to have Stranger in a Strange Land, Starship Troopers, or his celebrated juveniles in mind than the solipsistic, arguably misogynistic books that appeared at the tail end of his career. Leave it to Charles Stross, author of Accelerando and Halting State, to find a fresh way to pay homage to late-period Heinlein in a space opera with decidedly 21st-century sensibilities. Saturn's Children uses Heinlein's 1982 novel Friday as its template, chronicling the solar system?spanning adventures of Freya Nakamichi 47, a femmebot designed for the carnal pleasures of her human masters. Unfortunately, humans died off two centuries ago, leaving Freya and her robotic siblings at extremely loose ends. On the run from aristocratic slaveowners with a grudge, the comely android takes a job as a courier, carrying a mysterious package in her abdomen from Mercury to Mars. En route, Freya finds herself imprinted with the memories of one of her missing sisters, falls in love with the wrong artificial person, and discovers unsettling secrets about the original model in her line. This overly complicated stand-alone novel never quite achieves the sublime lunacy or the mind-bending inventiveness of its author's best work. But rather like the book that inspired it, Saturn's Children offers more than its fair share of action, humor, artful extrapolation, and intriguing discourses on the nature of free will. --Michael Berry
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780441017317
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 6/30/2009
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 336
  • Sales rank: 201,340
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.60 (h) x 1.10 (d)

Meet the Author

Charles Stross was born in Leeds, England in 1964. He holds degrees in pharmacy and computer science, and has worked in a variety of jobs including pharmacist, technical author, software engineer, and freelance journalist. He is now a full-time writer.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 40 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(16)

3 Star

(7)

2 Star

(5)

1 Star

(3)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 40 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 9, 2008

    more from this reviewer

    Excellent science fiction thriller

    By the twenty-third century humanity was extinct leaving behind androids that were built to feel and think and even dream like mankind once did. The androids created a caste system. The Aristos are nobles who own slaves expected to obey them or else. There are also some free independent droids who are mostly impoverished manual laborers. --- Freya Nakamichi was made to be a sexbot, but thanks to her sibs is free. The mysterious Jeeves offers Freya a well paying job as a courier she accepts. Her first assignment is to go to Mercury to pick up a biological sample that she is to place in her uterus and bring it to a lab on Mars. The task seems simple and straightforward although she has no idea what the sample is and why suddenly people seem to be hunting her for her ¿package¿. She eludes killers, thieves and an assortment of other predators as she races to Mars. --- Imagine a world in which androids are the dominant species and act like humans in all respects except they cannot reproduce. Thus SATURN¿S CHILDREN is about a culture the androids have forged centered on a caste system although the slaves and the free strive for a better life. Freya is a bot Lara Craft, a strong willed skilled beauty who uses brain and some brawn to think her way out of danger. Charles Stross answers the Philip K. Dick philosophical question Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep? with this original look at a mirror humanoid culture. --- Harriet Klausner

    4 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 22, 2012

    An excellent read

    A smart, funny, and yes sometimes deep story with an entirely engaging main charachter. If Freya is an answer to Heinlein's Friday, all I have to say to Stross is 'Bravo, Sir!'.

    I'll save you the mini book report and just lest you know that the premise is a meaty one and handled very well by an accomplished writer with a firm grap of the Sci-Fi genre. Also a good interplanetary techno-thriller to boot.

    I'd not read this author before and sometimes felt that everthing good in Sci-Fi has already been written and that I had read it along with too much dreck.

    So pleased to have found a " new" author.

    Oh, yea. Freya Friday....

    I get it now!

    Sometimes I can be so dense!

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 15, 2013

    Hey this book rocks!

    Good job

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 15, 2011

    Ok

    It was a good book, but it would hav been better if she was human, or cared about real love. Other than that it was a bloody good read.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 8, 2013

    Interesting from another life form's point of view.

    Stross's writing style is a bit wearing much of the time, but the story itself merits attention.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    00 JHJGHFHDG

    00
    +-----+

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 2, 2010

    Dont know what the hype is

    I have a good collection of sci-fi, in fact I have every hugo award book from the very first one...and I dont get this book. Almost every review is favorable, but it took me 2 months to finish this book..I only did because I hate to not finish a book. Maybe this was too complicated a read for me...but I did not get the humor..I could not follow the plot or dialogue. This is one book that when I finally finished, I could say that I threw away. The sexual content was not humorous to me and could not wait until I was done..I do not recommend this book.

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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